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The observations made on the second limb of the moon by Lieut. SHORTInnnn, shew the necessity of observing that limb as well and as frequently as the first, with the view of determining the exact longitude of a place.

The following is a List of the Occultations of Stars by the Moon, observed by Mr. Bounnnnson, at Sehairanpiir, latitude 29° 57' 79" N. longitude 5 h. 10. m. 54.1 E. with the longitudes as deduced by him.

Mean time of Resulting AR of Star. Dec. of Star. Phenomenon. Longitude.

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Mean, 5 10 54,1 Note.-The AR of these stars have been deduced from the Madras catalogue (by Mr. TAYLOR we suppose): and, with the exception of the emersion of H. Gemino

rum which may be in excess about 3", the mean times of the other phenomena are estimated to be correct Within one second.

Of the other stars whose occultations have been observed there is but one (63 Ceti) that can be traced in Piazz'i’s catalogue.

Jan. 1st, 1800 63 Ceti (78) AR=32° 44' 30"0, Annual motion +47",34
Dec. + 6“ 49’6',8 ,, 16,88

The observations made by_Mr. BOULDERSON and by Col. T. Omvna would have been published in a former No. of this Journal, but that we were in expectation of obtaining other corresponding observations from some of our scientific correspondents to incorporate with them: the longitudes of the places where these observations were made have been deduced for them, for each day, with reference to Greenwich, on the supposition that the apparent AR of the stars, and of the moon, as given in the Nautical Almanac, would accord with observations made on these objects at Greenwich.

A correspondent has brought to our notice that there is, generally, about 0,55‘. of difference between the apparent AR as given in former numbers of this Journal and in the Nautical Almanac for 1834. This we much regret ; and the more so, as it is out of our power, at present, to apply a remedy. ' ,

In a catalogue of 7 20 stars, recently published by the Astronomer Royal, andfrom which, doubtless, the places of those in the Almanac have been taken, there are but seven which accord in AR with the catalogue of the Astronomical Society, (Mem. As. Soc. iv. 258,) while there are,

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94 stars whose AE differs between 0,3 and 0,4
0,4 and 0,5
0,5 and 0,6
0,6 and0,7
0,7 and 0,S&c.

from which it will be seen that, that catalogue, which unfortunately we do not possess, we cannot apply a remedy to this evil.

VII.—Prooeedings of the Asiatic Society.
Wednesday Evening, the 2nd July, 1834.

The Right Rev. the Lord Bishop of Calcutta, Vice-President, in the chair.

Read the Proceedings of the last Meeting.

Read letter from Dr. A. HAMILTON, and Capt. WILLIAM Fonsv, acknow. lodging their election as members of the Society.

Read a letter from M. A. LANGL018, Professor of the University of France, acknowledging his election as an honorary Member of the Society.

Read extract of a letter from T. CLEMISHAW, Esq. stating that he regrets being obliged to withdraw from the Society from motives of economy. _

Read a letter from H. T. Pnmssr, Esq. Secretary to Government in the General Department, forwarding copy of a letter from Monsieur Conmnn, administrator of the French Possessions in Bengal, soliciting on behalf of a learned Society at Paris, a complete set of Meteorological Tables for this country, irom January, 1823, to June, 1834-.

Resolved, that such records as exist for the period in question shall be placed at the disposal of the French Society.

Library.

Read a letter from Enwaan T. Brzmvnrr, Esq. Secretary of the Zoological Society of London, forwarding the Journal of their proceedings, January to October, 1833, together with the first part of 1st volume of their Transactions, for presentation to the Society. '

The following books were also presented:

Memoirs of the Astronomical Society of London, 6th vol.-—by the Society.

Dr: LA Becnz’s Geological Manual, 3rd edition—by the Author.

Chrestomathie Chinoise, comprising six Chinese works, (including the Sanfeuh iny, or Vocabulary, in three characters,) lithographed at Paris under the charge of Monsr. KLAPROTH, at the expence of the French Asiatic Society—¢ly the Society.

Observation on Cholera Asphyxis, by J. Hvrcnmson, Esq.—by the Author.

Transactions of the Medical and Physical Society, vol. vii. Pt. l—by the Society.

The Indian Journal of Medical Science, Nos. 5, 6, and 7-by Messrs. J. Gnarrr and J. T. Puanson, Editors.

The Bytul Pachisee, and the second edition of the “ Vidvun Mada Tarauginee," translated into English, by RAJA KALrxIsa1tN—-presented by the Author.

Meteorological Register for May, l834—hy the Surveyor General.

Ditto, kept at Cawnporc, for October, November, and December, 1832, and March, April, and May, 1833—by Lieut. Col. Ponocx, C. B.

Read extracts from a letter addressed to the Secretary by Professor H. H. Wnson, announcing the receipt of the Mooacnosr Manuscripts sent home under charge of Lieut. Buumas, and stating that an arrangement was under negociation to print them free of expence to the Society.

“ Part of the journals, digested and corrected as I propose, have been already placed in the publisher’s (MURBAY’S) hands. I sought for Tnnnr.cx's map, at the India House for some time in vain, but at last found it had been incorporated with other cis-Himalayan maps, by Mr. WALKER in his atlas. He is willing to prepare it in as much detail as Tnanncx’s field books will allow." (We have reason to know that the matter incorporated in W.u.1crm‘s atlas was taken from a copy traced on thin paper from the original map in this country by a gentleman who visited England on furlough, in 1824, and we are not sure that copies were ever sent home oficially to Leadenhall street, but rather suppose they may be still found in the archives of the Political Secretary's Otfice.)

Mr. Wnsou alludes also to the Indo-Scythic coin brought to light by Lieut. Bmmns, and attributed to Kanishca, The Greek scholars of Oxford all read the inscription KANHPKO1‘. No doubt the discoveries since made in Bactrian numismatics will excite great interest among the antiquarians of the University.

Antiquities.

Read a letter from W. Srumunn, Esq. forwarding twelve pieces of metal supposed to be ancient coins, which were dug up on clearing an estate in the Sunderbuns (lot. xliv. of Capt. T. Pnnvsne's Sunderbun map.)

These coins are of silver and copper, square or circular, without any proper die impression, but bearing merely small chhdps or shriif marks of various kinds. The silver pieces have an average weight of 52 grains, and have been adjusted by cutting off the corners.

Read a letter from Major L. R. Srsov, bringing to the notice of the Society two coins of his cabinet, having the symbol observed in the Behat coins of Capt. CAUTLEY, united to a Greek inscription. Connected with this subject, the Secretary also exhibited to the meeting, and read a note on, a silver coin of the same type just received from Lieut. A. Cosonnv, bearing a most clear and unequivocal inscription in the illegible character, No. I. of the Allahabad column.

(We shall hasten to lay drawings of these two curious coins before our

readers.) Asecond letter from Major Smcv drew the Society's attention to a

small copper coin found in Malwa, having the image of a sphinx on the obverse. Read a letter from Captain G1-:0. BURNEY on the subject of the Peili inscription at Gaya. .. The impressions of the inscriptions were it seems taken off by Captain BUBNEY himself in Feb. 1833, with very great trouble ; and there was no Pandit in the

. envoy’s suite; one copy was given to the Governor General, with a translation,

and the other to the Burmese Ambassador. The remaining copy with the trans. lator’s observations was intended for the Asiatic Society. We regret that our ignorance of these circumstances should have caused a premature publication of the inscription, but Capt. B.’s observations will still be of equal value.

Copies of an inscription in Nag-ri, Marhatta, and Tamul characters, from a stone dug up in building a new ghat at Benares, were communicat. ed in a Persian letter from Mfmshi Pal Singh, at Benares.

The stone was 29 feet long and 9 feet in girth, it seems to have belonged to a temple of no great antiquity. The inscriptions are too imperfect to be deciphered, but the example of making such discoveries known is deserving of every encouragement. They bear the date Samvat 1655.

Physical.

Specimens of the fossilshells found in the lime quarries ' on the banks of

the Derwent river, 12 or 13 miles from Hobart Town, in Van Dieman's

Land, were presented by H. T. Pnmsnr, Esq.

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