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TABLE Shewing average Dew-points at Calcutta, for the first and last quarters

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- Shewing quantity of Rain fallen near London, from Sept. 1819, to Sept. 1822

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1. 2.68 in. rain, Sept. 25-2. 4.60 do. Sept. 26-3. 2.14110. Aug. 2-4. 3.32 0. only months of 1823, of which the Registers are to be found)-7. 4.06 in. rain, May 9-13. 2.06 July 13-14. 4.48 June 15-15. 2.36 Aug. 4-16. 3.66 Sept. 20-17. 4.40 5.40 Sept. 20-23. 1.08 Jan. 6-24.2.20 Oct. 14-25 3.04 Oct. 16-26. April 26, 1.4 wind—30. 6.29 June 28-31 2.25 July 5-32. 2.05 Aug. 16-33. 4.60 Sept. 29-29. 4.22 and do. May 26—32.'2.80 May 15-40. 2.15 June 19-38. 2.90 June 25-41. 2.20 288 June 13-47. 305 June 14-48. 285 June 1849. 2-00 June 20-95. 252 July 8-48 and Nov. 1-54. 1.65 Feb. 11-55. 1.18 March 26-56. 1.32 March 27-57 2.63. Aug. 7-60. 165 and do. Oct. s—61. 146 Nov. 1-6.200 May 15-63 May 21, 2.90 and hen13-67. 2.34 Dec. 21. Note—Where two numbers have been used in the same place

No. 3.
at sun-rise, on every day of the Moon’s age.
. After New Moon.
0 1 21314 516 7 8\9 10111211314

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770 75?
No. 4. .
of the Year, with distance from New Moon (taken at sun-rise).

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Aug. l6.—5. 2.56 do. Aug. 17-6. 3.00 do. Aug. 18; (Note. Aug. and Sept. are the 28-8. 2.03 May 29-9. 2.16 June 30-10. 2.4 June 1-11. 2.26 Jul)’ 1-12. 254 July June 29-11. 3.72 June 30-19. 4.45 Aug. 3-20. 202 Aug. 13--21. 3.58 Sept. 6-22. and strong wind 27. 2.18 June 2- 28. hurricane and 3.55 June 13-29. 27, violent 3.30 Oct. 22-35. 2.50 April 20-36. 2.00 April 28-37. 3.00 and storm May 25-38. July 8-42 3.90 July 26-43. 2-03 Sept. 7-14. 2.20 April 18-45. 2.00 June 9-36,

2.10 Aug. 16-50. 3.12 Sept. 20-51. 2.35 Oct 11--52. 53. storm and rain, Oct..31

8-—58. 3.00 Aug. 9-59 2.97 Aug. 23-57. 1.71 and storm Oct. 6—58. 354 and do. Oct. vy storm, 64 May 22 5.34 and do.—65July 17. 2.14 6.3 2.0 Aug. 17-66. 2.28 Oct.' the last 1s referred to with a dot over it, thus 49.

VII.—On the Measurement of the Ilahy Guz, of the Emperor Akber. By W. Cmcnorr, Esq.

[In a letter to the Editor.] In the determination of the Ilahy guz, given in your useful tables

‘with the June number of the Journal, I observe that Colonel Hoocson

has deduced a length of 33.58 inches from the average measure of the marble slabs of the pavement of the Taj at Agra, and that other lengths which he has deduced from that building, vary from 32.54, to 35.8, a difference of 3.26 inches, or nearly one-tenth of the whole measure. Government having fixed 33 inches as an arbitrary value of the Ilahy guz, it is no longer an object of importance in point of practice to seek further for its original length ; it may still however be a matter of curiosity, and as that deduced from my own measures of the marble slabs of the Taj, and other parts of the bdilding, (made at the Colonel’s request in 1826,) differs from his very much, I send you the detail of my measurement, which you can publish whenever more interesting matter be not at hand. I made use of a surveyor’s measuring tape, the error of which I_ ascertained by marking off lengths of a well executed 2-feet brass scale, by WATKINS, on the terrace of a verandah, with a fine black-lead pencil, carefully covering the pencil marks at each division by the assistance of a magnifying lens, and obtained the following, taken off with hair compasses and measured on the diagonal

scale.

feet. error of tape. ft. error. ft. error. At 56 0.93 58 1.00 . 60 1 00 5 7 0.95 5 9 .95 65 '

All my longest measures, from 44 to 49 slabs, being within these numbers of feet, the error has been assumed at one inch in 60 feet, or 1.720 part of the whole, and is additive, the tape being too long, and

giving the lengths less than they really were.

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Measures on the east side of the Taj, South side of the Taj Direction North and South. Direction East and West.

Slabs. feet. inches. Slabs. feet. inches.

1 45 60 2.5 10 49 65 4.8

2 45 60 1.5 11 49 64 1.8

3 46 61 3.5 12 49 65 0,5

4 44 58 7.3 13 49 65 0.2 5 46 61 3.5 Direction N. and S.

Direction E. and W. 14 45 60 1.7

6 48 63 6.8 15 45 60 1.2

7 48 63 8.2 16 45 60 2.0

8 48 63 8.6 17 45 60 3.1

9 49 65 2.9 18 45 60 "‘ 1.2

In other parts of the pavements.

19 46 61 6.5 . 22 49 65 1.5

20 49 65 0.6 23 49 65 2.0

21 49 65 1.4 24 45 60 2.5

which give 1127 slabs, equal to feet 1501 00.8 in. of the tape, or adding its error. to 18036.8 inches, and the Ilahy guz, 32.012 inches.

To this length, however, it appears to me that a correction for the mortar should be applied, as it is more probable that the marble slabs were cut to half a guz, than laid down by that measure; and from_ various observations, I assume this quantity at 0.03 inch between each slab, or 0.06 inch. for the guz, leaving 31.952 inches for the deduced length. I am the more satisfied that this correction is necessary, from having observedin several places, larger slabs of marble laid down, with. grooves cut in them to match the junctions of the small slabs, and at’, the end of all of which a space had been left and filled up with mortar, equivalent to the accumulated excess of length caused by the mortar‘ between the slabs of half a guz, and proportional to their numbers. I measured some of the larger slabs, and found their lengths as follows :

guz deduced from each stone

in. m.
A stone of four guz, . . . . .. . .. .. . .. 128.4 32.2
A stone of two guz, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64.0 32.0
A square stone of 1 guz, . . . . . . . . . . 31.8 31.8
Another, .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .- .. 31.8 31.8

the average of the whole giving exactly 32.0 in the Ilahy guz. Assuming then 32 inches to be a very near approximation to the

real Ilahy guz, it is worthy of observation that almost every principal apartment, or part of the building, has been planned in an integral number of guz : thus each face of the inside of the principal octagon under the central dome is 24 feet = 288 inches, which is exactly equal to nine guz of 32 inches, and the north-east boorj on the river terrace is 16 feet in diameter = 192 inches = six guz of 32 inches. I am therefore of opinion, that the average length of the Ilahy guz was, at the time of the building of the Taj, as nearly as can be now ascertained, a. minute fraction below 32 English inches.

The two first data, chosen by Mr. HALHED, viz. the measure‘-of an average of barley-corns, or of Musoori pice, appear to me less liable than most others to error, and the mean of these is 31.93 inches. It is probable that the length 2460 barley corns, or 400 pice, divided by l0, would give a still nearer approximation.

[We think the argument deduced from the measurement of the apartments being integrals of the guz to be conclusive, for it is the native mode of laying down the ground plan of a building always to divide the paper off into squares of some unit of length:—See_ the plan of the Visvesvur Shiwala in Pnnssnfls Illustrations of Benares, first series. In that building the unit was also one guz, but it was the maimdree guz, of about 26 inches, still commonly employed in the town. From similar measurements of other ancient buildings, Muhammedan and Hindu, might thus be obtained with tolerable accuracy thevalue of linear.-me» sures of different periods.—En.]

Vlll.-Proceedings of the Asiatic Society.
Wuinecday Evening, the 6th August, 1834.
The Reverend W. H. MILL, D. D. Vice-President, in the chair.

Monsieur Fnnnmann Rnmwnn, proposed at the last Meeting, was elected

a member of the Society. Mr. M. LARRULETA, at his own request was allowed to withdraw from

the Society.

Read a letter from H. T. Pnnvssr, Esq. General Secretary to Government, returning thank for the Meteorological Registers furnished in par. suance of the resolution of last Meeting.

. Dr. J. TYTLER addressed the meeting in explanation of the delay which had occurred in the reply of the local committee of the Oriental Translation

Fund to the reference of last April, regarding the publication of Mr.

_Yxrns’s Nalodaya. But two members of the original committee now remain in India, and the funds

were lost by the failure of Messrs. Macxmrosn and Co. It was out of their

power therefore, to patronize the work to the extent that would be required for its publication in India: and the committee did not feel authorized to pledge the

fund at _home to adopt the work as one of its own series if printed in India, al.

though such might probably be the event. Mr. J. Pamsnr moved, seconded by the Vice-President, that the Asiatic So

(Eiety should subscribe for fifty copies at 12 rupees, as suggested by the author. Baboo RAM Comm. SEN, seconded by Mr. Pnmser, moved as an amendment

that twenty-five copies would be suflicient for the purposes of distribution to those

Societies entitled to receive a copy of the Society’s works. The amendment was

carried by a majority of 2. Library.

Read a letter from EDWARD T. BENNETT, Esq. Vice Secretary of the Zoological Society of London, forwarding a copy of their proceedings,

Apri1—December, 1832.
Read a letter from Raja Knmxrssnn, forwarding on behalf of Nawab

IQBAL-00D Downun Bonanoon, a copy of his work, called “Iqbal-e_furung, or British Prosperity,” accompanied by a literal translation into the English.

Read a letter from Nnsnrvrn Monnnason, Esq. W. S. presenting a copy of his work entitled “ Hints on the Trisection of an Angle and the Dupli_

cation of the Cube in Elementary Geometry.” The second part of the Christa Sangita, by the Rev. 1V. H. MILL, D. D.,

published at the Bishop’s College Press, was presented—by the Author.

Meteorological Register for June, 1834, by the Surveyor General.
Madras Journal of Literature and Science, No. 4‘, by the llladras

Literary Society.
The Calcutta Medical Journal for J uly—-by the Editors.

Museum. . An image of Buddha in fine preservation, dug up in the neighbourhood

‘of Kabul, was presented in the name of Dr. J. G. GERARD, through the

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