Shakespeare's Romance of the Word, Volume 10

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Bucknell University Press, 1990 - Literary Criticism - 183 pages
This work is a critical study of Pericles, Cymbeline, The Winter's Tale, and The Tempest, with a focus on Shakespeare's exploration of language in its destructive potentialities and its redemptive workings.

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Contents

Acknowledgments
9
Cymbeline
41
The Winters Tale
74
The Tempest
109
Conclusion
141
Bibliography
170
Copyright

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Page 138 - And mine shall. Hast thou, which art but air, a touch, a feeling Of their afflictions, and shall not myself, One of their kind, that relish all as sharply Passion as they, be kindlier mov'd than thou art ? Though with their high wrongs I am struck to the quick, Yet, with my nobler reason, 'gainst my fury Do I take part.
Page 131 - O, it is monstrous! monstrous! Methought, the billows spoke, and told me of it; The winds did sing it to me; and the thunder, That deep and dreadful organ-pipe, pronounc'd The name of Prosper; it did bass my trespass. Therefore my son i" the ooze is bedded ; and I'll seek him deeper than e'er plummet sounded, And with him there lie mudded.
Page 65 - tis Slander, Whose edge is sharper than the Sword, whose tongue Out-venoms all the Worms of Nile, whose breath Hides on the posting winds, and doth belie All corners of the World. Kings, Queens, and States, Maids, Matrons, nay the Secrets of the Grave This viperous slander enters.
Page 54 - Whilst summer lasts, and I live here, Fidele, I'll sweeten thy sad grave: Thou shalt not lack The flower, that's like thy face, pale primrose; nor The azur'd hare-bell, like thy veins; no, nor The leaf of eglantine, whom not to slander, Out-sweeten'd not thy breath...
Page 43 - It is incident to him to be now and then entangled with an unwieldy sentiment, which he cannot well express, and will not reject; he struggles with it a while, and if it continues stubborn, comprises it in words such as occur, and leaves it to be disentangled and evolved by those who have more leisure to bestow upon it.
Page 43 - ... it a while, and if it continues stubborn, comprises it in words such as occur and leaves it to be disentangled and evolved by those who have more leisure to bestow upon it. Not that always where the language is intricate the thought is subtle, or the image always great where the line is bulky ; the equality of words to things is very often neglected, and trivial sentiments and vulgar ideas disappoint the attention, to which they are recommended by sonorous epithets and swelling figures.
Page 19 - Fish. Why as men do a-land: the great ones eat up the little ones.

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