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Inflexo cornu. The Phrygian flute or flageolet consisted of two straight tubes, of unequal length and unequal diameter, to the ends of which was attached a crooked metallic appendage, called kødwv, resembling the extremity of a French horn. Hence the epithet 'curvus. Compare Catull. 63. 22

• Tibicen ubi canit Phryx curvo grave calamo,' and Virg. Ae. 9. 617.

O vere Phrygiae, neque enim Phryges! ite per alta

Dindyma, ubi assuetis biforem at tibia cantum,' on which Servius, 'Tibiae autem Serranae dicuntur, quae sunt pares, et aequales habent cavernas; aut Phrygiae, quae et impares sunt, et inaequales habent cavernas.'

5. Semimares, &c., the mutilated priests—the 'Galli' or ‘Corybantes.' See introduction. Inania, i. e. 'hollow.'

7. Molli, 'effeminate.'

9. Scena, the theatrical exhibitions; ludi, the games of the circus. See introduction.

12. Lotos. This Lotos or Faba Graeca, described by Pliny, H. N. 16. 30, and 24. 2, is a tree which must be carefully distinguished from the lotos of the Lotophagi, the lotos or water-lily of Egypt, and the cloverlotos of Virgil. Compare Pliny H. N. 16. 36

Nunc sacrificae (sc. tibiae) Tuscorum e buxo, ludicrae vero loto ossibusque asininis et argento fiunt;' also Silius II. 432

• Vt strepit assidue Phrygiam ad Nilotica loton

Memphis'.. and Mart. 8. 51, 14

* Palladius tenero lotos ab ore sonat,' where remark the difference of gender.

13. Doctas...neptes, i.e. the Muses. Cybele being identified with Rhea, and Rhea being the mother of Zeus, the Muses, who were the daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne, would be the granddaughters of Cybele.

17. Erato, derived from ēpws, 'love. The island of Cythera (Cerigo) being a chosen resort of Aphrodite (Venus), she was thence called Cythereia, and the month Aprilis being, according to one derivation, named after Aphrodite, is here termed. Mensis Cythereius.'

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Inflexo cornu. The Phrygian flute or flageolet consisted of two straight tubes, of unequal length and unequal diameter, to the ends of which was attached a crooked metallic appendage, called kódov, resembling the extremity of a French horn. Hence the epithet 'curvus. Compare Catull. 63. 22

Tibicen ubi canit Phryx curvo grave calamo,' and Virg. Ae. 9. 617

O vere Phrygiae, neque enim Phryges! ite per alta

Dindyma, ubi assuetis biforem dat tibia cantum,' on which Servius, 'Tibiae autem Serranae dicuntur, quae sunt pares, et aequales habent cavernas; aut Phrygiae, quae et impares sunt, et inaequales habent cavernas.'

5. Semimares, &c., the mutilated priests—the ‘Galli' or 'Corybantes.' See introduction. Inania, i.e. 'hollow.'

7. Molli, 'effeminate.'

9. Scena, the theatrical exhibitions; ludi, the games of the circus. See introduction.

12. Lotos. This Lotos or Faba Graeca, described by Pliny, H. N. 16. 30, and 24. 2, is a tree which must be carefully distinguished from the lotos of the Lotophagi, the lotos or water-lily of Egypt, and the clover lotos of Virgil. Compare Pliny H. N. 16. 36

· Nunc sacrificae (sc. tibiae) Tuscorum e buxo, ludicrae vero loto ossibusque asininis et argento fiunt;' also Silius 11, 432

Vt strepit assidue Phrygiam ad Nilotica loton

Memphis'. and Mart. 8. 51, 14

Palladius tenero lotos ab ore sonat,' where remark the difference of gender.

13. Doctas...neptes, i.e. the Muses. Cybele being iden'itied with Rhea, and Rhea being the mother of Zeus, the

who were the daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne,
the granddaughters of Cybele.
in derived from épws, 'love.' The island of Cythera

g a chosen resort of Aphrodite (Venus), she
alled Cythereia, and the month Aprilis being,
one derivation, named after Aphrodite, is here
is Cythereius.

19-35. The legend of Kronus (Saturnus) devouring his children, the stratagem of Rhea, by which Zeus (Jupiter) escaped, and the subsequent expulsion of Kronus from the throne of heaven, have been already fully detailed in the note, p. 242, the first part of which must be read carefully, in order to enable the student to comprehend these lines.

20. Excutiere. The idea is that of a person jolted out of a seat, as in Met. 15. 524 'Excutior curru....

26. Fidem. Belief arising from confidence in the truth of what we have heard.

27. Saxum. This stone, we are told, was called Baitulos, or Abbadir. See Stephan. Thesaur. and Priscian. p. 647.

Gutture. Although 'viscere' is found in only one MS., it is probably the true reading, since 'gutture sedit' would imply that the stone stuck in the throat of Kronus. If we adopt 'gurgite,' the expression will be analogous to 'altique voragine ventris' in Met. 8. 843.

29. Ide in Crete is here indicated, since that island was generally accounted the birthplace of Zeus, although both Arcadia and Phrygia claimed him as their own. See Excursus of Heyne on Ae. 3. 111.

32. Curetes...Corybantes. As far as we can venture to pronounce an opinion upon a subject, with regard to which the testimonies of ancient writers are of the most confused and contradictory description, it seems scarcely doubtful that the ‘Curetes' and 'Corybantes' were originally completely distinct from each other.

The ‘Curetes' were Cretan priests, who, clad in armour, performed the stately and graceful Pyrrhic dance, in honour of Zeus, to the music of drums and Autes, while the ‘Corybantes' were the mutilated ministers of Phrygian Cybele, who with shouts, and shrieks, and howls, and frantic gestures, attended the processions of the goddess. The original Curetes' were said to have watched the cradle, and by clashing their weapons, to have drowned the cries of the infant god, who thus escaped the jaws of his jealous sire, and hence they are represented by several ancient writers as divinities, and are classed along with the Nymphs and Satyrs who nursed the youthful Bacchus.

We have before remarked, that when the worship of Cybele was introduced into Greece, the Phrygian goddess

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was, from some resemblance in her attributes, identified with Rhea, and that the double Ida in Crete and Phrygia served to render the confusion more complete. Hence the Phrygians claimed Zeus as their countryman, and many of the Greeks called the attendants of Cybele ‘Curetes' and 'Corybantes' indifferently. The Roman writers make no distinction whatever between them, as may be seen by referring to the passages indicated at the bottom of the page !, and from the lines from Lucretius, 2. 628 sqq. which immediately follow those already referred to in the introduction, and are particularly valuable, from the minute and lively picture they present.

In addition to the original ‘Curetes,' the divine attendants of Zeus on Mount Ida, and the later Curetes,' who in Crete performed a martial dance on certain festivals, there were Curetes' in Aetolia and Acarnania who belong to history, being a tribe who dwelt near Pleuron. We hear of Curetes' in Euboea also, who, from the manner in which they are spoken of, seem to occupy the debateable land between mythology and history.

Our great authority among the ancients for all that concerns the 'Curetes' and 'Corybantes’ is Strabo, who has fully detailed the various legends and the theories founded upon them, while in modern times the whole subject has been analysed in a most masterly manner by Lobeck in his Aglaophamus.

45. Cybele is here given as the name of a Phrygian mountain, and so in Fast. 4. 363 'Inter, ait, viridem Cybelen altasque Celaenas,

Amnis it insana, nomine Gallus, aqua,' but it is seldom mentioned by geographers.

52. Edomito...orbe. There is a little anticipation here. The event described happened, as we have seen, 205 B. C., at a period when the Romans had not yet terminated the second Punic War, which was to them a struggle for existence.

53. Carminis Euboici. The prediction of the Cumaean Sibyl. Cumae was founded by a colony from Chalcis in

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? Ov. Fast. 4. 210, Martial. 9. 16, Silius 17. 20, Senec. Herc. Oet. 1872, Val. Max. 2. 4. Germanicus in his translation of Aratus renders Δικταίους Κουρήτας by Dictaeos Corybantes'

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