The English of Shakespeare: Illustrated in a Philological Commentary on His Julius Caesar

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Ginn and Heath, 1880 - 386 pages

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Page 97 - And Caesar's spirit, ranging for revenge, With Ate by his side come hot from hell, Shall in these confines with a monarch's voice Cry ' Havoc ! ' and let slip the dogs of war ; That this foul deed shall smell above the earth With carrion men, groaning for burial.
Page 65 - Why should that name be sounded more than yours? Write them together, yours is as fair a name; Sound them, it doth become the mouth as well; Weigh them, it is as heavy; conjure with 'em, Brutus will start a spirit as soon as Caesar.
Page 111 - There is no terror, Cassius, in your threats ; For I am armed so strong in honesty That they pass by me as the idle wind, Which I respect not.
Page 101 - tis his will. Let but the commons hear this testament (Which, pardon me, I do not mean to read). And they would go and kiss dead Caesar's wounds, And dip their napkins...
Page 100 - He hath brought many captives home to Rome. Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill : Did this in Caesar seem ambitious? When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept; Ambition should be made of sterner stuff: Yet Brutus says, he was ambitious; And Brutus is an honorable man.
Page 102 - If you have tears, prepare to shed them now. You all do know this mantle : I remember The first time ever Caesar put it on ; 'Twas on a summer's evening, in his tent That day he overcame the Nervii :l — Look ! in this place ran Cassius...
Page 110 - Julius bleed for justice' sake ? What villain touch'd his body, that did stab, And not for justice? What ! shall one of us, That struck the foremost man of all this world But for supporting robbers, shall we now Contaminate our fingers with base bribes, And sell the mighty space of our large...
Page 64 - We both have fed as well ; and we can both Endure the winter's cold as well as he. For once, upon a raw and gusty day, The troubled Tiber chafing with her shores, Caesar said to me, Dar'st thou, Cassius, now Leap in with me into' this angry flood. And swim to yonder point t Upon the word, Accoutred as I was, I plunged in, And bade him follow : so, indeed, he did.
Page 223 - And bring all Heaven before mine eyes. And may at last my weary age Find out the peaceful hermitage, The hairy gown and mossy cell, Where I may sit and rightly spell Of every star that heaven doth shew, And every herb that sips the dew, Till old experience do attain To something like prophetic strain.
Page 112 - Come, Antony, and young Octavius, come, Revenge yourselves alone on Cassius, For Cassius is aweary of the world ; Hated by one he loves...

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