Page images
PDF
EPUB

Discursu vaga saltitans tenello, Metitur spatia invidæ caverna. Sic in se pia mens reposta, secum Altè tuta sedet, nec ardet extrà, Aut ullo solet æstuare fato: Quamvis cuncta tumultuentur, atra Sortis turbine non movetur illa: Fortuna furias onus triste Non tergo minus accipit quieto, Quàm vectrix Veneris columba blando Admittit juga delicata collo. Torvæ si quid inhorruit procellæ, Si quid sæviat & minetur, illa Spernit, nescit, & obviis furorem Fallit blanditiis, amatg & ambit Ipsum, quo male vulneratur, ictum. Curas murmure non fatetur ullo; Non lambit lacrymas dolor, nec atræ Mentis nubila frons iniqua prodit. Quod si lacryma pervicax rebelli Erumpit tamen evolat gutta, Invitis lacrymis, negante luctu, Ludunt perspicui per ora risus.

DEO NOSTRO,

TE DECET HYMNUS SACRED POEMS,

COLLECTED,

CORRECTED,
AUGMENTED,

Most humbly Presented.

MY LADY

THE COUNTSSE OF DENBIGH

BY

Her most devoted Servant.
R. C.

IN hea[r]ty acknowledgment of his immortall
obligation to her Goodnes & Charity.

AT PARIS,

By PETER TARGA, Printer to the Arch-
bishope [o]f Paris, in S. Victors streete at
the golden sunne.

M. DC. LII.

CRASHAW E,

THE

ANAGRAMME.

HE WAS CAR.

W

AS CAR then Crashawe; or WAS Crashawe CAR, Since both within one name combined are? Yes, Car's Crashawe, he Car; t'is love alone Which melts two harts, of both composing one. So Crashawe's still the same: so much desired By strongest witts; so honor'd so admired CAR WAS but HE that enter'd as afriend

With whom he shar'd his thoughtes, and did commend (While yet he liv'd) this worke; they lov'd each other: Sweete Crashawe was his friend; he Crashawes brother. So Car hath Title then; t'was his intent

That what his riches pen'd, poore Car should print.
Nor feares he checke praysing that happie one
Who was belov'd by all; dispraysed by none.
To witt, being pleas'd with all things, he pleas'd all.
Nor would he give, nor take offence; befall
What might; he would possesse himselfe and live
As deade (devoyde of interest) t'all might give
Desease t'his well composed mynd; forestal'd
With heavenly riches: which had wholy call'd
His thoughtes from earth, to live above in'th aire
A very bird of paradice. No care

Had he of earthly trashe. What might suffice
To fitt his soule to heavenly exercise.
Sufficed him and may we guesse his hart
By what his lipps brings forth, his onely part
Is God and godly thoughtes. Leaves doubt to none
But that to whom one God is all; all's one.

What he might eate or weare he tooke no thought.
His needfull foode he rather found then sought.
He seekes no downes, no sheetes, his bed's still made
If he can find, a chaire or stoole, he's layd,
When day peepes in, he quitts his restlesse rest.
And still, poore soule, before he's up he's dres't.
Thus dying did he live, yet lived to dye
In th-virgines lappe, to whom he did applye
His virgine thoughtes and words, and thence was styld
By foes, the chaplaine of the virgine myld
While yet he lived without: His modestie
Imparted this to some, and they to me.
Live happie then, deare soule; injoy the rest
Eternally by paynes thou purchacedest,
While Car must live in care, who was thy friend
Nor cares he how he live, so in the end,
He may injoy his dearest Lord and thee;
And sitt and singe more skilfull songs eternally.

« PreviousContinue »