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creasing taste for religious poetry which is now prevalent, and from the conviction that the work will be useful in the private and family reading of the Psalms, and other Scriptures, of Sermons, and other religious works. Such private and family use, whether by reading or singing, will at once be edifying in itself, and preparatory to the intelli. gent use of these Psalms and Hymns in public worship. The annexed Indexes will render some assistance in adapt. ing the contents to these various purposes, by means of which several yearly courses may be selected; but a familiar acquaintance with the book will be found the best guide.

The Spirit of the whole book of Psalms is here exhibited, in a form suited for congregational singing; a second version being sometimes added, either as having been long in use among us, or as suited to many choice tunes, which are, or may be, introduced in congregations, where sacred music is more carefully cultivated. The prophetical and historical Psalms are adapted to our use, in these latter days, in connection with the successive Evangelical Festi. vals, and the Proper Lessons. Short explanatory prefaces are prefixed, and Scripture references given, especially where the Old Testament is quoted in the New.

Scripture Hymns will be found a prominent feature of this Selection. Those excepted which are read or chaunted in our Liturgy, most of the Songs of Scripture have been introduced; and Hymns on the Types, and Prophecies, and on other doctrinal and devotional passages, similar to the book of Psalms, in as large a measure as utility seemed to require, and comprehension allowed. The Apostolical prayers and doxologies will be found nearly complete. The adaptation of these has been an especial object to the Compiler; inasmuch as they, together with the other Scripture Hymns, appeared to him the most appropriate Supplement to the book of Psalms. But as very many of them were not discovered by him at all, in the religious poetry hitherto extant, and others not in a form sufficiently suited to this purpose, he has attempted to supply the deficiency by ori. ginal compositions. They aim only at utility, and pretend to no poetical elegance: but, such as they are, they are quite at the service of the Christian public. In other in. stances, and indeed throughout the work, he has been induced to use such freedom in abridging and altering the compositions of others, in order to adapt them to the principles upon which the Selection was projected, that he can scarcely do less than make himself responsible for all the defects which may be discovered. He wishes it to be view. ed as an original work, and to be judged of according to it. own merits, in the form in which it appears, by the sole test of congregational utility. It is, however, greatly in. debted to almost all the writers of religious poetry; and many even of those Psalms and Hymns, which might other. wise be called original, are indebted for all the value and beauty they possess to some stanza, line, or expression, either of deceased, or living writers.

The Compiler would have rejoiced to think he had realized more successfully the idea of a Scripture Hymn Book, which, as Mr. Montgomery justly observed to him, might be useful“ in every sanctuary under heaven.” But the materials which the Bible affords for Scripture Hymns, are very abundant. He trusts he has selected the most useful; and has endeavoured to exhibit faithfully, by whatever expressions he could find or devise, the exact senti. ment of the passage; and to present it in a form suited for congregational singing. The remaining Hymns, though not exactly Scripture Hymns, are at least Scriptural ; and will be found perhaps to make the Collection sufficiently comprehensive; although very many well known and valuable Hymns have been unavoidably omitted, in order to approximate to a completion of every part of the original plan. The Editor continually endeavoured to comprise each portion in three or four verses ; but the selection of a more quickly-moving tune, so that it be also suitable to the subject, will enable a congregation to sing five or even six verses with equal brevity and propriety. Sometimes a portion only of such longer Hymns will be found suitable to particular subjects and occasions. (See H. 62.)

In the hope and prayer that the work, as now prepared, may contribute to christian edification and devotion, and that the principles upon which it has been compiled may, if approved, be more happily applied by some more competent person, the Compiler commends the volume to the blessing of God. Truly animating, and much more edifying, would be the worship in our Churches, if our congrégations more generally complied with the request, to join “ with a pure heart and humble voice” in the united and responsive parts of our Liturgy;-in chaunting the Psalms and Hymns after the Lessons, the simplest and easiest mode of music;—and in that, which is not much more difficult of attainment, the full unison and harmony of “ Psalms, Hymns, and spiritual Songs,” sung to suitable congregational tunes.

J. C. FRANKS. Vicarage, Huddersfield,

Sep. 16, 1833.

INDEX OF SUBJECTS.

The figures refer to the Pages.

GOD.

THE natural attributes of the one, only, true, and living
God, 86, 91, 108, eternal and unchangeable, 96, 111, 177,
239, invisible, spiritual, and incomprehensible (i. e. omni-
present) 156, 214, 217, 338, 377; infinite in knowledge,
wisdom, and power, 62, 217, 365; omniscient and irre-
sistible, 9, 100, 156, 217, 221; the only object of worship,
238, vanity of idols, 105, 129, 237, 229.

God's glory and power in heaven, 381; in Creation, 16,
22, 32, 94, 115, 178, 279, 280; in the Elements, 27, 115;
Ocean, 122; Seasons, 65, 115, 165, 166; Providence, 32,
36, 57, 65, 79, 247, 346, 352; Government of the world,
45, 62, 63, 65, 66, 80, 87, 356—358; Providence and Grace,
98, 150, 151, 280.

The Name of the Lord, 194, 238, 279 ; His moral attri-
butes compared with man's character, 36; harmoniously
displayed by the Gospel, 90. 278—280; Holiness, 191, 229;
Justice and mercy, 7, 31, 63, 278; forbearance and righte-
ous judgments, 6, 9, 63, 215, 247; power, majesty, and
condescension, 6, 7, 68, 128, 155, 243, 279; goodness, 31,
33, 113, 114, 162; mercy, 157, 251, 293; grace, 282; redeem-
ing love, 108, 255.

God of patience, comfort, aud hope, 365; all creatures
dependent on him, 78, 116, 156, 164, 214, 223, 225, 236;
all-suificient, 4, 62; our refuge, 56, 61, 98, 140, 159, 164;
mighty to save, 240; hears our prayers, 64, 163, 221; re-
members and pities our frailty, 113, 236.

Blessedness of the knowledge of God, 220, 224, 227, 289;
seeking God, 26, 117, 211, 221, 243; evil of forsaking
God, 8, 12, 86, 95, 143, 246; glorying in God, 245.

God's peculiar care of his Church, 26, 73, 127, 165, 166,
231, 239, of his people, 112, 130, 158, 163, 240, 243, 304.

The God of Abrabam, 117, 185; God and Father of our
Lord Jesus Christ, 366-380.

Prayer to God, in general, 5, 10, 13, 17, 18, 24, 29, 56,
61, 64, 73, 78, 85, 91, 119, 141, 158, 159; Prayer of Jacob
at Bethel, 189; of Jabez, 213; of Solomon, 213, 214; of
Agur, 225.

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Praise to God, in general, 7, 15, 27, 58, 103, 117, 119,
124, 126, 131, 150, 16l, 167. Songs of Moses, 192, 203,
204; of Deborah, 207; of Hannah, 208; of David, 210, 211;
of Hezekiah, 235; of Seraphim, 229; of the redeemed, 230,
231, 234; of Angels at Christ's birth, 266, 268; of Angels,
and the Church triumphant, 381–388.
Universal praise to God, 113, 131, 167–171, 321.

MAN.
Created, and to be renewed, in the image of God, 178,
277, 280, 281, 290_293, 305, 316_319; fearfully and won-
derfully made, 157.

Man's fall, condemnation, and sinfulness, 9, 53, 59,
180—183, 214, 217, 226, 228, 246, 250, 251, 255, 281, 285,
293.

His misery without God, 218, 220, 236, 245; man's help
vain, 50, 62, 164; his present state unsatisfying and un-
certain, 40, 50, 51, 97, 218, 227, 236, 245, 246; his
mortality, 40, 41, 96, 181, 218, 236, 348; his immorta-
lity, 13, 219, 282, 308311; man by nature, grace, and
glory, 182, 282.

Character and blessedness of the faithful servants of God,
3, 4, 11, 22, 38, 39, 106, 113, 127, 250; and misery of the
ungodly, 1, 36, 216.

Řighteous and wicked compared, 1, 8, 9, 34.

Sin, fatal, 246; its deceitfulness, 181, 210; secret and
presumptuous, 17; excludes from heaven, 324, 375.

Folly, fruits, and consequences of Atheism and Infidel-
ity, 11, 55.

Wisdom's call and promises, 211, 220, 222-224, 243,
276, 281.

The world, and the flesh, 13, 51, 139, 287, 288, 289, 328,
353, 368, 379.
The Devil, or Satan, 15, 160, 161, 307, 378, 385.

SCRIPTURE.
Value and properties of the word of God, 16, 135—139,
257-259, 383, 365.

Necessity of attending to it, 86, 367, 373, 375.
Law and Gospel, 193, 194, 195—199, 254.
Gospel, 95, 199, 235 240, 261, 276, 281, 303, 322, 367, 376.
Word of God faithful and eternal, 10, 15, 31, 136, 236.

Evidences of its truth, (See prophecies, and types) Mira-
cles, 66, 72, 79, 82, 129, 233; use and necessity of revela-
tion, 254–260, 270—274, 276_-282, 366; Gifts of the
Spirit, and character of Apostles, 316, 372. Character of the
primitive Churches, 45, 333, 374; internal evidence, 16, 90,
135, 136, 375.

Prophecies of Scripture; First promise, 182, Covenant
and promise to Noah, 184; to Abraham, 77, 189; Jacob's
prophecy, 190; Balaam's, 201; of the prophet like Moses,
202; of the Son of David, 210, 256, 268; Job's, 220; of
Christ born of a Virgin, 229; and his glorious titles, 230;
of his birth at Bethlehem, 250; of his miracles, 233; of his
forerunner, 205, 247; of his prophetic character, 237; of
the stone smiting the Kingdoms, 248; of Christ having the
key of David, 231 ; other prophecies by Daniel, Haggai,
Zechariah, and Malachi, 256, 268; Rejection of the Jews,
72, 105, 125, 256, 299. Call of the Gentiles, 67, 92, 128,
131, 189, 190, 227, 237, 240.

Prophetical Psalms, 2, 6, 12, 15, 19, 20, 29, 34, 41, 42,
45, 46, 48, 67, 69–73, 75, 85, 90, 93, 100-108, 124, 126,
132, 147.

Types of Christ; Melchizedec, 186, 126; Ram in place of
Isaac, 188; Passover, 191; Manna, &c. 192, 205; legal sa-
crifices, 195; the lamb of the daily sacrifice, 196, 261;
High-priest on the great day of atonement, 197; the priest-
ly vestments, 196; Aaron, 107; Moses, 202; Joshua, 205;
Brazen Serpent, 200; David, 209, 247.

Other Scripture types; The fire on the altar, 198; Jubi.
lee, 199, 244; Fire and cloud, 204, 205; the way to Ca-
naan, 192; Jordan, 204, 206; David, 209; the temple, 107,
198, 217.

Characters, and events of Scripture, Creation, 178; Fall,
180; deluge, 183; Covenant with Noah, and Abraham's
call, 184; Covenant with Abraham, 117, 186; Sodom, 187;
Isaac, 188; Joseph, 118; last plague, and Passover, 191;
Departure from Egypt, 118; Egyptians drowned, 192;
Israelites delivered, 81, 129; Rebellions at the Red Sea,
120; Giving of the law at Sinai, 129, 193, 332; Calf in
Horeb, and refusal to go to Canaan, 83, 120; lusting for
flesh, 82; Balaam, 200; Israel led to Canaan, 81, 129,
203-207; Apostacies in Canaan, 84; Deborah, 207; Han-
nab, 208; Samuel, 209; David, 209, 54, 55; ark brought to
Zion, 22, 48, 68, 147; David's grievous sin, &c. 210, 52; ex.
pulsion by Absalom, 43, 56, 63; plague at Jerusalem, 28;
David's last words, 210; Solomon, 2114-214; Sennacher-
ib's army destroyed, 80; Hezekiah's sickness, 235; first
temple destroyed, and captivity, 79, 84, 85, 153; return
from it, 143.

JESUS CHRIST.
His divinity, 2, 46, 224, 230, 235, 250, 254, 266, 268, 315,
380,

His humiliation and incarnation, 7, 42, 254—256, 295;
his birth, 265–268; his circumcision, 275; visited by the

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