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this scene.

so, mother! He was always a most long dark-blue traveling cloke, wearing a affectionate husband to me,' said the poor corresponding cap with a gold hand and lady, with tears. -'Ay, ay! he has tassel, black bushy hair with whiskers and brought himself and his family to a pretty mustachios of the same color, and treadpass, I think.' Mr. Keville walked ing heavily in a pair of brass-shot Wel

humbly and sadly toward the door, and lington boots. Mrs. Stanhope stood in do together with Lydia seemed glad to avoid breathless suspense: the person who had

entered continued silent for some mi. The circumstances of the patient's nutes, and at last burst into a hearty death are thus described.-"God have laugh, saying, 'Is it possible you don't mercy upon this unhappy sufferer!' know me?'-—Good Heaven,' said Mrs. prayed Mr. Keville, as they retired Stanhope, why have you come at such amidst the shrieks of their lamented an hour, and in such a dress ?'-—' It is friend, which rang in their ears as they not late-only nine o'clock—and as for proceeded down stairs, until the very my dress, excepting the whiskers and street-door was closed upon them. He mustachios, it is what I often travel in. continued more or less in this state for But what is the matter? Are you really two days, by which time he was unable offended ?'—'I am more than offended, to sit up; and on the third he fell into a Georgina; I am shocked, both because, stupor, which the physicians said was knowing my dislike to all trick, any likely to have a fatal termination. To practised upon me is an insult, and beward the evening of that day, however, cause I know not in what this coarse his eye cleared, he was propped a little unfeminine joke may have involved me. up, and seemed to busy himself silently Good God! at a moment when I feared in vain efforts to fold up one of his

being seen with an elderly clergyman, sleeves. “Sir,' said his man, observing you come to my house disguised like a his efforts, “I will help you.'— You hussar! O! Georgina, was this like a will help me!' he said, scornfully; 'no,

sister? My very servants 'I no, John! he continued, shaking his shall soon settle that,' said the undaunted head, and as if quite in his senses; ‘ you

Georgina ; and ringing, desired the sercannot help me, for in my case vain is

vant to assist her in unrobing; and apthe help of man! And immediately he plying her fingers to her face, restored it began to sing, in the clear and tasteful to its wonted smoothness, and then, with manner for which he was remarked when perfect composure, told the servant, that in good health, a suitable hymn, alluding in case of robbers she always disguised

our eternal home. Intent on this herself when traveling through a lonely idea

, he repeated that consolatory pas- country, such as that which she had passsage, his voice sinking into weakness, ed within the last two hours. and faltering with emotion. A few re. “ The girl looked astonished at the lieving tears trickled down his worn change which had taken place, but far cheeks. As he laid back his head, he had more so, when, unbuckling the leather just strength to raise his hand to his strap, and pulling off her cap and wig, head, and to cover his eyes with his long she displayed a head of glossy, luxuriant, thin fingers; the corners of his mouth dark brown or nearly black ringlets. dropped gradually down ; and the ser. Strange !' said the servant ; vant, after some time observing that he really a lady? I took you for a gentledid not alter his position, approached the man-soldier. bed-side, and found that his master was

« This remark increased the melandead !"

choly of Mrs. Stanhope, who did not even attempt to rally her spirits, or to give a welcome to her sister. This is a

cold reception, sister,' said Georgina. 'Is LIGHT READING, OR

it possible that a mere jest can give you MODE OF MANUFACTURING NOVELS;

such serious offence ?'--' It is not the from the Novel of Florence, or the jest, Georgina ; it is the levity it springs Aspirant.

from, and the serious mischief of which

it may be productive, that shock me. A LADY is supposed to be sitting in a But the deed is done, and I must bear melancholy mood, when she is startled the results, whatever they are ; and in by a knock at the door.—“The waiting the mean time I shall endeavour to think maid ushered in a person wrapped in a

no more of it.

Florence, get tea or

to 6

are you

A SPECIMEN OF EASY

WRITING AND
THE GENERAL

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gave

coffee for your aunt, and then look after things to wear; but they give conse. her apartment.'-' Don't stir; I have quence, and their designs, and mottos, been at the inn for two hours, and drank and settings, afford conversation some. tea; I bate to spoil the pleasure of an times; besides, I like to create surprise, arrival by sending the mistress or young by hinting that I got this from a geneladies of the house to look after viands.' ral, that from an admiral, and another

Two hours ? I thought you said to from a duchess. I have a brooch and my servant that

you had traveled for the drops to match that little myrtle in molast two hours.' -' Lord, sister, are you saic which the duchess of Dstill so literal ? Who, to look at you, me.'-The duchess of D -!' said would expect such old-fashioned no Mrs. Stanhope ; I remember your tions? I said so, just to do away my buying it the last time I was in London.' whiskers and mustachios to your servant; "To be sure it is the same; I am merely but I put them on for a mere frolic.' letting you hear a little puff

, just to give “Mrs. Stanhope rose in disgust, and one an air of importance.' was about to leave the room, when her “Mrs. Stanhope took up the candle

, sister threw her arms round her neck, and left the room without uttering a assuring her that, notwithstanding her single word; Florence, who had been follies, she had a true and a kind heart.

examining the rings, threw them froin "Come, my dear Susan,' said she, let us her in disgust; and Georgina indulged be friends; I have come a great many herself in a flood of tears, probably more miles to see you, and, with all my giddi- angry than repentant." ness, I can perceive, and I do so with deep regret, that you are annoyed by some new trouble, or else your old ones

TRAITS OF TRAVEL, stirred up again.

Don't let this joke shake your confidence in my regard, by the Author of High-ways and Bye-ways. whatever else I may lose.'- This is MR. Grattan is, in our opinion, an beyond a joke, Georgina; but we shall agreeable and entertaining writer. He say no more of it. Tell me when you reflects on whatever he observes in his left London'- A week ago.'-'A week circumspective progress, and his remarks, to travel two hundred miles !'~'Yes, I if not always profound, are generally juam never so happy as on a journey, and I dicious.—To him (says a critic) "every prolong the pleasure of it as much as mile in a journey affords room for a possible.I need not ask if you came sketch or a reflection of some value; he in a public vehicle, unless your taste is profits largely by all new peculiarities

, much changed.'-Not in the least: I social and personal, that arise on his still like the changes and chances of a path; and he permits no feature of intermail-coach; if the company be vulgar or est, either in the country or the people, not amusing, it is easy to stop at the to escape unnoticed. Unlike those trafirst stage ; and no disparagement to velers, who judge of communities by your hospitality-I am never so entirely individuals, and classify whole masses happy as in an inn; for there every body by the indications thrown out in insustrives to serve you, and nobody finds lated atoms, he rarely ascribes to the nafault.'-'Where is your luggage??—“At tion that which belongs to the man, and the hotel; it comes in the morning. I wisely hesitates in his summary of the hate the bustle of trunks and bandboxes, general character, until he has obtained when one should be embracing and an authentic body of general evidence. indulging in all the — I don't If he be not a very deep thinker, he know what you sentimentalists would lacks none of the advantages of good call it.'

sense; if not very profound in his ana“Mrs. Stanhope could not help smi. lyses, he is cautious and correct; if not · ling at the oddness of a person so well philosophical, he is at all events rational understanding all the practical part of and acute; if he develope no statistical what she could not have defined in research in his works, he exhibits a grawords; and endeavoured to forget her phic power that atones by popular depeccadillos in the recollection of her real scription for the absence of more laboworth. She then laughed at the load of rious and, perhaps, less useful details. rings which adorned her sister's some It is well for his readers that he failed in what large but very handsome fingers. the drama, since his incapacity in that 0! yes,' said she, they are horrid style has thrown him back upon another,

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for which he possesses high and unde- which irresistibly seised every bystander. niable qualifications. There are few Every one made way for him, and he narrative authors who display more flu- entered the barrack; and, seemingly alency, variety, and ease; his language is lured by the savory fragrance of the well selected, his sentences are never dinner, be advanced into one of the harsh or monotonous, and the pleasantry inner rooms; but, as it seemed to me, in that threads like a bright vein the body of momentary consciousness of his forbidhis fictions seems natural and necessary ding and forlorn appearance, he shrank to their construction. It is true that the back from the fire-place, and couched conversational tone in which he fre- low upon a little three-legged stool, in quently writes has subjected him to the the most distant corner. He was immecharge of feebleness; for people gene- diately surrounded by the kind-hearted rally consider that what is familiarly ex

soldiers and their kinder wives, who, pressed cannot be powerful or compre one and all, got over their disgust and hensive in its kind; but we think that a fright, and vied with each other in attendre-perusal of his former volumes willing to their miserable guest. Large porcorrect an opinion that is justified by the tions of soup, bread, and meat, were manner of the author rather than by his placed before him, and voraciously de. matter;" and many parts of the present voured, while a murmured utterance of work, we may add, tend still more to thanks and blessings broke from him at counteract that charge.

intervals. When his hunger was sati. We

gave a specimen of this work on a ated, I said to him, “Now, my poor felformer occasion; and we now quote, low, come warm and dry yourself-get from the reminiscence of a scene in Ire near the fire.'-—'Oh, no, no, groaned he, land, entitled “No Fire!" a passage in a hollow and shuddering groan-- no which exhibits strong marks of feeling. fire-no fire!' and, starting up from his -"A figure rushed from the wood, sitting posture, he rushed to another frightful at first sight and shocking on corner of the room, into which he hudexamination. It was that of a man, tall, dled himself, putting his face close to the gaunt, and middle-aged. Fever was on wall, and shivering in the violent impulse his lip and madness in his eye. His of some horrible recollection. This emohollowed cheeks, bushy ard, and mat tion excited in about equal ratios the pity ted hair, spoke disease, neglect, and of the men and the terror of the women, misery, and the wild glance which rolled thus stamping its alliance with the first backwards as he tottered toward me, and finest elements of that deep tragic gave evidence of maniac imbecility and feeling from which it sprang. Perceivexhaustion. His right-hand grasped a ing that the coarse sympathy of the group staff, which was useless either for sup- around him only worried the poor sufport or offence, while he feebly waved ferer, I strove with a little more address his arm above his head. His body was to soothe bis irritation. My efforts sucwrapped in a coarse blanket, girded ceeded; for after a few minutes he looked round his middle by a rope of straw; gratefully up to me, and exclaimed, in a his emaciated limbs were all bare, with tone of deep and savage pathos, 'God the exception of his left arm, which was bless you, and keep you and your's from enveloped in the rude covering that form- fire and flame !- Look here, continued ed his only shelter against wet and he abruptly, where it scorched and wind.

withered me;' and, with gesture and “While the soldiers stood steadily action suiting the words, he drew from prepared, not merely for the approach of beneath his blanket thé shrunken and this apparition, but for whatever might excoriated remnant of his once sinewy follow its movements, the poor wretch

The marks of the fierce element fearlessly, or rather unconsciously, moved were fresh on it; it was scathed and forwards and redoubled his pace, as about scorched from the shoulder to the wristhalf a dozen ragged village boys, who a blasted branch of the decayed stem it pursued him with loud shouts, emerged hung to. •Good God! How did this from the lane. Flying from their perse. happen, poor creature?' burst from a cution to the shelter of the barrack, he dozen voices. •Whist, whist, and I'll implored protection with an air so pite- tell you,' hoarsely whispered the maniac, ously helpless, that even the fears of putting his finger to his lips ; “but say O Toole and Mrs. Merryweather died nothing--don't waken them-Norah and away before the compassionate wonder the childer are sleeping still—whist!

arm.

coffee for your aunt, and then look after things to wear; but they give conse. her apartment.'--' Don't stir; I have quence, and their designs, and mottos, been at the inn for two hours, and drank and settings, afford conversation some. tea; I hate to spoil the pleasure of an times ; besides, I like to create surprise, arrival by sending the mistress or young by hinting that I got this from a geneladies of the house to look after viands.' ral, that from an admiral, and another - Two hours ? I thought you said to from a duchess. I have a brooch and my servant that you had traveled for the drops to match that little myrtle in molast two hours.'

-Lord, sister, are you saic which the duchess of D gave still so literal? Who, to look at you, me.'-'The duchess of D --!' said would expect such old-fashioned no Mrs. Stanhope ; I remember your tions? I said so, just to do away my buying it the last time I was in London.' whiskers and mustachios to your servant; "To be sure it is the same; I am merely but I put them on for a mere frolic.' letting you hear a little puff, just to give

“Mrs. Stanhope rose in disgust, and one an air of importance.' was about to leave the room, when her “Mrs. Stanhope took up the candle, sister threw her arms round her neck, and left the room without uttering a assuring her that, notwithstanding her single word; Florence, who had been follies, she had a true and a kind heart. examining the rings, threw them from Come, my dear Susan,' said she, 'let us her in disgust; and Georgina indulged be friends; I have come a great many herself in a flood of tears, probably more miles to see you, and, with all my giddi- angry than repentant.” ness, I can perceive, and I do so with deep regret, that you are annoyed by some new trouble, or else your old ones

TRAITS OF TRAVEL, stirred up again. Don't let this joke shake your confidence in my regard, by the Author of High-ways and Bye-ways. whatever else I

may

lose.'— This is MR. GRattan is, in our opinion, an beyond a joke, Georgina ; but we shall agreeable and entertaining writer. He say no more of it. Tell me when you reflects on whatever he observes in his left London.'—' A week ago.'-'A week circumspective progress, and his remarks, to travel two hundred miles !'_“Yes, I if not always profound, are generally juam never so happy as on a journey, and I dicious.—To him (says a critic) "every prolong the pleasure of it as much as mile in a journey affords room for a possible? I need not ask if you came sketch or a reflection of some value ; he in a public vehicle, unless your taste is profits largely by all new peculiarities, much changed.'— Not in the least: I social and personal, that arise on his still like the changes and chances of a path; and he permits no feature of intermail-coach; if the company be vulgar or est, either in the country or the people, not amusing, it is easy to stop at the to escape unnoticed. Unlike those trafirst stage; and-no disparagement to velers, who judge of communities by your hospitality-I am never so entirely individuals, and classify whole masses happy as in an inn; for there every body by the indications thrown out in insustrives to serve you, and nobody finds lated atoms, he rarely ascribes to the nafault.'- Where is your luggage??—“At tion that which belongs to the man, and the hotel; it comes in the morning. I wisely hesitates in his summary of the hate the bustle of trunks and band boxes, general character, until he has obtained when one should be embracing and an authentic body of general evidence. indulging in all the

I don't If he be not a very deep thinker, he know what you sentimentalists would lacks none of the advantages of good call it.'

sense; if not very profound in his ana“ Mrs. Stanhope could not help smi lyses, he is cautious and correct; if not ling at the oddness of a person so well philosophical, he is at all events rational understanding all the practical part of and acute; if he develope no statistical what she could not have defined in research in his works, he exhibits a grawords; and endeavoured to forget her phic power that atones by popular de peccadillos in the recollection of her real scription for the absence of more laboworth. She then laughed at the load of rious and, perhaps, less useful details

, rings which adorned her sister's some It is well for his readers that he failed in what large but very handsome fingers. the drama, since his incapacity in that "O! yes,' said she, “they are horrid style has thrown him back upon another,

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for which he possesses high and unde- which irresistibly seised every bystander. niable qualifications. There are few Every one made way for him, and he narrative authors who display more flu- entered the barrack; and, seemingly alency, variety, and ease; his language is lured by the savory fragrance of the well selected, his sentences are never dinner, be advanced into one of the harsh or monotonous, and the pleasantry inner rooms; but, as it seemed to me, in that threads like a bright vein the body of momentary consciousness of his forbid. his fictions seems natural and necessary ding and forlorn appearance, he shrank to their construction. It is true that the back from the fire-place, and couched conversational tone in which he fre- low upon a little three-legged stool, in quently writes has subjected him to the the most distant corner. He was immecharge of feebleness; for people gene- diately surrounded by the kind-hearted rally consider that what is familiarly ex soldiers and their kinder wives, who, pressed cannot be powerful or compre one and all, got over their disgust and hensive in its kind; but we think that a fright, and vied with each other in attendre-perusal of his former volumes willing to their miserable guest. Large porcorrect an opinion that is justified by the tions of soup, bread, and meat, were manner of the author rather than by his placed before him, and voraciously de. matter;" and many parts of the present voured, while a murmured utterance of work, we may add, tend still more to thanks and blessings broke from him at counteract that charge.

intervals. When his hunger was sati. We gave a specimen of this work on a ated, I said to him, “Now, my poor felformer occasion; and we now quote, low, come warm and dry yourself-get from the reminiscence of a scene in Ire near the fire.'—'Oh, no, no, groaned he, land, entitled “No Fire !" a passage in a hollow and shuddering groan—no which exhibits strong marks of feeling. fire—no fire !' and, starting up from his -"A figure rushed from the wood, sitting posture, he rushed to another frightful at first sight and shocking on corner of the room, into which he hudexamination. It was that of a man, tall, dled himself, putting his face close to the gaunt, and middle-aged. Fever was on wall, and shivering in the violent impulse his lip and madness in his eye. His of some horrible recollection. This emohollowed cheeks, bushy beard, and mat- tion excited in about equal ratios the pity ted hair, spoke disease, neglect, and of the men and the terror of the women, misery, and the wild glance which rolled thus stamping its alliance with the first backwards as he tottered toward me, and finest elements of that deep tragic gave evidence of maniac imbecility and feeling from which it sprang. Perceivexhaustion. His right-hand grasped a ing that the coarse sympathy of the group staff, which was useless either for sup- around him only worried the poor sufport or offence, while he feebly waved ferer, I strove with a little more address his arm above his head. His body was to soothe bis irritation. My efforts sucwrapped in a coarse blanket, girded ceeded; for after a few minutes he looked round his middle by a rope of straw; gratefully up to me, and exclaimed, in a his emaciated limbs were all bare, with tone of deep and savage pathos, God the exception of his left arm, which was bless you, and keep you and your's from enveloped in the rude covering that form fire and flame !'-Look here,' continued ed his only shelter against wet and he abruptly, where it scorched and wind.

withered" me;' and, with gesture and “ While the soldiers stood steadily action suiting the words, he drew from prepared, not merely for the approach of beneath his blanket thé shrunken and this apparition, but for whatever might excoriated remnant of his once sinewy follow its movements, the poor wretch arm. The marks of the fierce element fearlessly, or rather unconsciously, moved were fresh on it; it was scathed and forwards and redoubled his pace, as about scorched from the shoulder to the wrist half a dozen ragged village boys, who a blasted branch of the decayed stem it pursued him with loud shouts, emerged hung to. Good God! How did this from the lane. Flying from their perse. happen, poor creature?' burst from a cution to the shelter of the barrack, he dozen voices. Whist, whist, and I'll implored protection with an air so pite- tell you,' hoarsely whispered the maniac, ously helpless, that even the fears of putting his finger to his lips; 'but say O'Toole and Mrs. Merryweather died nothing—don't waken them-Norah and away before the compassionate wonder the childer are sleeping still—whist!

!

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