The Continuation of Mr. Rapin's History of England: From the Revolution to the Present Times, Volume 7

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Page 550 - That in case the crown and imperial dignity of this realm shall hereafter come to any person not being a native of this kingdom of England this nation be not obliged to engage in any war for the defence of any dominions or territories which do not belong to the crown of England without the consent of Parliament.
Page 437 - It is very obvious, that nothing would more conduce to the obtaining so public a good, than to make the exportation of our own manufactures, and the importation of the commodities used in the manufacturing of them, as practicable and easy as may be...
Page 177 - ... allay, is cut into 62 shillings ; and, according to this rate, a pound weight of fine gold is worth 15 pounds weight 6 ounces 17 pennyweights and 5 grains of fine silver, reckoning a guinea at 1 Is. 6d. in silver money ; but silver, in bullion, exportable, is usually worth 2d.
Page 19 - ... that it may be declared and enacted, That all and singular the rights and liberties asserted and claimed in the said declaration, are the true, ancient, and indubitable rights and liberties of the people of this kingdom...
Page 125 - Stock belonging, or which hereafter shall or may belong to the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, called Bank Stock, or to the Governor and Company of Merchants of Great Britain trading to the South Seas and other parts of America...
Page 512 - Persons of foreign Nations being often employed in the Education and Tuition of Youth, both at home and in their Travels...
Page 169 - ... the ceremony was over, fpoke fome warm words to the duke, expreffing his refentment at what he had done. Upon report of thefe words to the king, his majefty thought fit to give a fudden mark of his difpleafure, by fending his commands to...
Page 451 - Obtained over the French and Bavarians, Near the Village of Blenheim, , On the Banks of the Danube, By JOHN Duke of MARLBOROUGH, The Hero not only of this Nation, but of this age; Whose Glory was equal in the Council and in the...
Page 477 - England, unobserved, from abroad, under the command of the late duke of Ormond, who was to have landed in the river with a great quantity of arms, provided in Spain for that...
Page 323 - The exordium of his speech is remarkable. " Among the Romans, the wisest people upon earth, the temple of fame was placed behind the temple of virtue, to denote that there was no coming to the temple of fame, but through that of virtue. But if this bill is passed into a law, one of the most powerful incentives to virtue would be taken away, since there would be no arriving at honor but through the winding-sheet of an old decrepit lord, or the grave of an extinct noble family...

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