The Invention of Tradition

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Cambridge University Press, Jul 31, 1992 - History - 322 pages
28 Reviews
Many of the traditions which we think of as very ancient in their origins were not in fact sanctioned by long usage over the centuries, but were invented comparatively recently. This book explores examples of this process of invention - the creation of Welsh and Scottish 'national culture'; the elaboration of British royal rituals in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; the origins of imperial rituals in British India and Africa; and the attempts by radical movements to develop counter-traditions of their own. It addresses the complex interaction of past and present, bringing together historians and anthropologists in a fascinating study of ritual and symbolism which poses new questions for the understanding of our history.
 

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Review: The Invention of Tradition

User Review  - Goodreads

Interesting essays on the invention of tradition in, among others, Scotland and Wales, India and Africa. I'm a bit at a loss with Hobsbawm's own essay at the end of the collection. It lacks clarity i ... Read full review

Review: The Invention of Tradition

User Review  - Stefaan Van ryssen - Goodreads

Interesting essays on the invention of tradition in, among others, Scotland and Wales, India and Africa. I'm a bit at a loss with Hobsbawm's own essay at the end of the collection. It lacks clarity i ... Read full review

Contents

II
1
III
15
IV
43
V
101
VI
165
VII
211
VIII
263
IX
309
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About the author (1992)

Eric Hobsbawm is a neo-Marxist historian of the Industrial Revolution who pays particular attention to the inequities toward the lower classes, especially in law and politics.

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