The National Preceptor: Or, Selections in Prose and Poetry: Consisting of Narrative, Descriptive, Argumentative, Didactic, Pathetic, and Humorous Pieces; Together with Dialogues, Addresses, Orations, Speeches. &c. Calculated to Improve the Scholar in Reading and Speaking; and to Impress the Minds of Youth with Sentiments of Piety and Virtue. Designed for the Use of Schools and Academies

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Pratt, Woodford, Farmer, and Brace, 1854 - Readers - 324 pages

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Contents

The Two Bees Dodsiey
55
Heroism of a Peasant
56
Biographical Sketch of Major Andre
57
The Miraclea German Parable
60
The Compassionate Judge
61
The Prudent Judgean Eastern Tale Mass Magazine
62
The Fox and the Cat
64
Lion and Dog
66
The Gentleman and his Tenant
73
Dishonesty Punished Kanes Hints
74
Socrates and Demetrius
76
The Dead Horse Sierne
77
Biographical Anécdotes 44 The Revenge of a Great Soul
80
Death of Prince William
81
He never smiled again Mrs Hemans
82
Naval Action
86
Damon and Pythias
90
Test of Goodness
92
e Mysterious Stranger Jane Taylor
93
Earthquake in Calabria Goldsmith
98
The Wild Boy Charles W Thompson
99
The Starling Sterne
100
Alcander and Septimius Goldsmith
102
IngratitudeStory of Inkle and Yarico
104
The Battle of Blenheim Southey
106
Story of the Siege of Calais
112
Examples of Decision of Character John Foster
116
or the Vanity of Riches Dr Johnson
118
Schemes of Life often Illusory Dr Johnson
121
The Hill of Science Aikin
123
The Vision of Mirza Spectator
126
The Chameleon
130
The Progress of Untruth Byrom
136
The Voyage of Life Dr Johnson
137
The Journey of a Daya picture of human life Dr Johnson
140
The Mummy Smith
143
Destruction of Jerusalem
148
Destruction of Jerusalemconcluded
152
The Warriors Wreath
156
Address to the Sun Ossian
160
Formation of Character J Hawes D D
162
On Happiness of Temper Goldsmith
164
The Sleepers
167
A Good Scholar May
168
Select Sentences
170
Select Paragraphs
173
Happiness is founded in rectitude of conduct Harris
177
Virtue and Piety mans highest interest Harris
178
Importance of Virtue Price
179
The Folly of Inconsistent Expectations Aikin
180
On the Beauties of the Psalms Horne
182
The Three Warnings Mrs Thrale
211
The Dervis and the Two Merchants Lacon
214
On the Present and Future State Addison
215
My Mothers Picture
218
Casabianca Mrs Hemans
222
Sternc
226
Diversity in the Human Character Pope
247
On the Pursuits of Mankind Pope 219
249
The Road to Happiness open to all Men Pope
251
Providence Vindicated in the Present State of Man Pupe
252
The Hermit Beattit
256
The Marriners Dream Dimond
258
Alexander Selkirk Couper
259
The Hermit Parnell
261
70
267
Stanzas addressed to the Greeks
272
Song of the Greeks 1822 Campbell
273
Warrens Address to the American Soldiers Pierpont
275
On the Existence of a Deity Young
283
Tomorrow Cotton
284
Vanity of Power and Misery of Kings Shakspeare
285
Darkness Byron
286
Cassius instigating Brutus Tragedy of Julius Cesar
291
Antonys Speech over the Body of Cesar Shakspeare
294
Othellos Apology for his Marriage Tragedy of Othello
296
Soliloquy of Hamlet on Death 9 Tragedy of Hamlet
298
Catos Soliloquy on the Immortality of the Soul Trag of Cuto
299
Speech of Catiline before the Roman Senate Crolys Catiline
300
The Rich Man and the Poor Man Khemnitzer
301
Address to the Ocean Byron
302
Wisdom Pollok
304
The Inhumanity of Slavery Cowper
305
The Cuckoo Logan
306
The Star of Bethlehem J G Percival
307
The Last Man Campbell
308
Picture of a Good Man Young
310
Hymn on a Review of the Seasons Thomson 911
311
Questions and Answers Montgomery
313
On the death of Mrs Mason Mason
314
Ode from the 19th Psalm Addison
315
Rest in Heaven 316 168 The Star of Bethlehem H K While
316
Address to Time Lord Byron
317
Absalom Willis
319
22
322
On Time H K White
323
Jugurthain Prison Rev C Wolfe
325
Rienzis Address to the Romar Miss Mitford
328
Battle of Waterloo Lord Byron
330
Power of Eloquence
331
Death of Marco Bozzaris Halleck
333
Dream of Clarence Shakspeare
335

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Page 154 - Large was his bounty, and his soul sincere, Heaven did a recompense as largely send: He gave to Misery all he had, a tear, He gained from Heaven ('twas all he wished) a friend.
Page 181 - By the struggling moonbeam's misty light, And the lantern dimly burning. No useless coffin enclosed his breast, Not in sheet nor in shroud we wound him; But he lay like a warrior taking his rest, With his martial cloak around him. Few and short were the prayers we said, And we spoke not a word of sorrow; But we steadfastly gazed on the face of the dead, And we bitterly thought of the morrow.
Page 293 - The wide, the unbounded prospect, lies before me; But shadows, clouds, and darkness rest upon it. Here will I hold. If there's a power above us (And that there is, all nature cries aloud Through all her works) he must delight in virtue; And that which he delights in must be happy.
Page 291 - Took once a pliant hour, and found good means To draw from her a prayer of earnest heart That I would all my pilgrimage dilate, Whereof by parcels...
Page 296 - There is a pleasure in the pathless woods, There is a rapture on the lonely shore, There is society, where none intrudes, By the deep Sea, and music in its roar: I love not Man the less, but Nature more...
Page 309 - Earth, Repeats the story of her birth : Whilst all the stars that round her burn, And all the planets, in their turn, Confirm the tidings as they roll, And spread the truth from pole to pole.
Page 275 - Ask yourselves how this gracious reception of our petition comports with those warlike preparations which cover our waters and darken our land. Are fleets and armies necessary to a work of love and reconciliation? Have we shown ourselves so unwilling to be reconciled that force must be called in to win back our love ? Let us not deceive ourselves, sir.
Page 152 - The struggling pangs of conscious truth to hide, To quench the blushes of ingenuous shame, Or heap the shrine of luxury and pride With incense kindled at the Muse's flame.
Page 290 - I come not, friends, to steal away your hearts : I am no orator, as Brutus is ; But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man, That love my friend; and that they know full well That gave me public leave to speak of him. For I have neither wit, nor words, nor worth, Action, nor utterance, nor the power of speech, To stir men's blood : I only speak right on...
Page 279 - No matter where. Of comfort no man speak: Let's talk of graves, of worms, and epitaphs; Make dust our paper, and with rainy eyes Write sorrow on the bosom of the earth; Let's choose executors and talk of wills : And yet not so — for what can we bequeath Save our deposed bodies to the ground? Our lands, our lives, and all are Bolingbroke's, And nothing can we call our own but death, And that small model of the barren earth Which serves as paste and cover to our bones.

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