Industrializing Additive Manufacturing - Proceedings of Additive Manufacturing in Products and Applications - AMPA2017

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Mirko Meboldt, Christoph Klahn
Springer, Sep 5, 2017 - Technology & Engineering - 362 pages
These proceedings exchange ideas and knowledge among engineers, designers and managers on how to support real-world value chains by developing additive manufactured series products. The papers from the conference show a holistic, multidisciplinary view.

 

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Contents

Evolution of Design Guidelines for Additive Manufacturing Highlighting Achievements and Open Issues by Revisiting an Early SLM Aircraft Bracket
3
A Design Method for SLMParts Using Internal Structures in an Extended Design Space
14
Exploring the Impact of Shape Complexity on Build Time for Material Extrusion and Material Jetting
24
Novel Optimised Structural Aluminium CrossSections Towards 3D Printing
34
Manufacturing Process Chain
47
Finite Element Modeling of Ceramic Deposition by LBMSLM Additive Manufacturing
49
Analysis of the Influence of Shielding and Carrier Gases on the DED Powder Deposition Efficiency for a New Deposition Nozzle Design Solution
59
Propeller Use Case
70
Development and Optimization of an Innovative Double Chamber Nozzle for Highly Efficient DMD
191
In Situ and RealTime Monitoring of PowderBed AM by Combining Acoustic Emission and Artificial Intelligence
200
Quality Related Effects of the Preheating Temperature on Laser Melted High Carbon Content Steels
210
Business Cases
220
Additive Manufacturing in Automotive Spare Parts Supply Chains A Conceptual Scenario Analysis of Possible Effects
223
An Industrial Case Study
238
Process Setup for Manufacturing of a Pump Impeller by Selective Laser Melting
252
Hybrid Integration Case Study with Sun Sensor for Cube Satellites
264

Macroscopic Finite Element Thermal Modelling of Selective Laser Melting for IN718 Real Part Geometries
82
Additive Manufacturing of Piezoelectric 33 Composite Structures
93
Additive Manufacturing of Semiconductor Silicon on Silicon Using Direct Laser Melting
104
Additive Manufacturing of Complex Ceramic Architectures
117
Process Chain Integration
124
An Advanced STEPNC Platform for Additive Manufacturing
127
Additive Manufacturing on 3D Surfaces
137
Integrated Platform for Multiresolution Additive Manufacturing
145
Enhanced Toolpath Generation for Direct Metal Deposition by Using Distinctive CAD Data
152
Performance Simulation and Verification of Vat Photopolymerization Based Additively Manufactured Injection Molding Inserts with MicroFeatures
162
Case Study of Transverse Loading of Aluminum Beams
169
Quality Assurance
178
Controlled Porosity Structures in Aluminum and Titanium Alloys by Selective Laser Melting
181
Temperature Monitoring of an SLM Part with Embedded Sensor
273
Unique Customer Benefits
285
Integration of FiberReinforced Polymers in a Life Cycle Assessment of Injection Molding Process Chains with Additive Manufacturing
286
Advantages in Additive Manufacturing for a Medium Format Metrology Camera
296
Patient Specific Implants from a 3D Printer An Innovative Manufacturing Process for Custom PEEK Implants in CranioMaxillofacial Surgery
308
Teaching and Training
316
WorkProcess Orientated and Competence Based Professional Training for Skilled Workers in Laser Additive Manufacturing
317
Why Education and Training in the Field of Additive Manufacturing is a Necessity
329
The Experience Transfer Model for New Technologies Application on Design for Additive Manufacturing
337
DecisionMaking in Additive Manufacturing Survey on AM Experience and Expertise of Designers
347
Author Index
361
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About the author (2017)

Mirko Meboldt completed his doctorial studies at the Institute of Product Engineering Karlsruhe (IPEK), Germany. In 2012 he was appointed as a full professor of product development and engineering design at ETH Zurich. His main research focuses on the development of new products in the field of mechanical engineering industries, biomedical applications and associated technologies. He currently works in the field of engineering design and product development, specialising in user-oriented product innovations, new production technologies and challenging applications.

Christoph Klahn has a PhD in laser additive-manufactured, gas-permeable materials for industrial applications from Hamburg University of Technology, Germany. He is the Head of Design for the Additive Manufacturing group at ETH Product Development Group pd|z and at Inspire AG since 2013. The goal of his work is to transfer knowledge of these new manufacturing processes to the Swiss industry.

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