A Tour on the Prairies, Issue 1

Front Cover
Account of Washington Irving's expedition in Oct. and Nov. 1832 through a part of the unorganized Indian country now the state of Oklahoma.
 

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User Review  - MrsLee - LibraryThing

Washington Irving used the notes from his 1832 tour on the Arkansas and Oklahoma prairie to write this account. As with any good story, he may have stretched the truth here, changed the timing of ... Read full review

Contents

I
1
III
10
IV
17
VI
24
VII
28
IX
37
X
43
XI
57
XXIV
161
XXV
169
XXVI
182
XXVII
189
XXVIII
205
XXIX
213
XXXI
220
XXXII
229

XII
61
XIII
69
XIV
79
XV
91
XVI
97
XVII
111
XIX
123
XX
134
XXI
144
XXIII
153
XXXIII
237
XXXIV
254
XXXV
263
XXXVI
279
XXXVII
286
XXXVIII
295
XXXIX
301
XL
315
XLI
325

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Page 225 - Jack-o'-lantern little Frenchman to deal with. Instead of keeping quietly up the right side of the valley, to get above the horses, the moment he saw them move toward the river, he broke out of the covert of woods, and dashed furiously across the plain in pursuit of them, being mounted on one of the led horses belonging to the Count.
Page 67 - It is difficult to describe the bewilderment and confusion of the bees of the bankrupt hive who had been absent at the time of the catastrophe, and who arrived from time to time, with full cargoes from abroad. At first they wheeled about in the air, in the place where the fallen tree had once reared its head, astonished at finding it all a vacuum.
Page 170 - We had been disappointed this day in our hopes of meeting with buffalo, but the sight of the wild horse had been a great novelty, and gave a turn to the conversation of the camp for the evening. There were several anecdotes told of a famous...
Page 221 - A beautiful meadow, about half a mile wide, enameled with yellow, autumnal flowers, stretched for two or three miles along the foot of the hills, bordered on the opposite side by the river, whose banks were fringed with cotton-wood trees, the bright foliage of which refreshed and delighted the eye, after being wearied by the contemplation of monotonous wastes of brown forest.
Page 299 - At length, some who resided on the opposite side of the village, taking courage from the continued stillness, would steal forth, and hurry off to a distant hole, the residence possibly...
Page 296 - While in the height of their playfulness and clamor, however, should there be the least alarm, they all vanish into their cells in an instant, and the village remains blank and silent. In case they are hard pressed by their pursuers, without any hope of escape, they will assume a pugnacious air, and a most whimsical look of impotent wrath and defiance. " The prairie dogs are not permitted to remain sole and undisturbed inhabitants of their own homes.
Page 5 - Mr. L., an Englishman by birth, but descended from a foreign stock ; and who had all the buoyancy and accommodating spirit of a native of the Continent. Having rambled over many countries, he had become, to a certain degree, a citizen of the world, easily adapting himself to any change. He was a man of a thousand occupations...
Page 65 - One of the hunters immediately ran up with a wisp of lighted hay, as a defence against the bees. The latter, however, made no attack, and sought no revenge ; they seemed stupefied by the catastrophe, and unsuspicious of its cause, and remained crawling and buzzing about the ruins, without offering us any molestation. Every one of the party now fell to, with spoon and hunting-knife, to scoop out the flakes of honeycomb with which the hollow trunk was stored.
Page 278 - ... heart, for the animal gave one convulsive throe and expired. While I stood meditating and moralizing over the wreck I had so wantonly produced, with my horse grazing near me, I was rejoined by my fellowsportsman, the Virtuoso; who, being a man of universal adroitness, and withal, more experienced and hardened in the gentle art of "venerie...
Page 223 - Wherever they approach the bounds of the ring, however, a huntsman presents himself and turns them from their course. In this way they are checked and driven back at every point, and kept galloping round and round this magic RINGING THE WILD HORSE.

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