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The Origin and History of the Three Great Divisions of the Medical Profession now existing in

England and Wales.

FIRST GREAT CORRUPTION, AND CONSEQUENT DIVISION.

6th and 7th Centuries ......... The Invasion of Medicine by Priests and Monks : 7th to 16th Century ............ The Alliance of Medicine with Priests and Monks : ........... PRIEST-PHYSICIAN. 1518 ...

..... The Emancipation of Medicine from Priests and Monks ...... PURE PHYSICIAN.

SECOND GREAT CORRUPTION AND CONSEQUENT DIVISION.

12th and 13th Centuries ...... The Invasion of Medicine by Barbers, &c. : 13th to 18th Centuries ......... The Alliance of Medicine with Barbers, &c. .......... 1745

... The Emancipation of Medicine from Barbers, &c. ..............

BARBER-SURGEON. PURE SURGEON.

THIRD GREAT CORRUPTION AND CONSEQUENT DIVISION.
17th and 18th Centuries ...... The Invasion of Medicine by Apothecaries :
18th and 19th Centuries ...... The Alliance of Medicine with Apothecaries...

APOTHECARY-PHYSICIAN.
Query ............

... The Emancipation of Medicine from Apothecaries ............... PURITY and UNITY COMBINED ?

THE

UNITY OF MEDICINE:

ITS

CORRUPTIONS AND DIVISIONS.

THEIR CAUSES.

“ Interest tandem scire qui qualesque viri medicinam coluerint, mutaverint, auxerint.”-J. C. G. ACKERMANN, Inst. Hist. Med.

NUMEROUS are the schools for obtaining a sound education in the medical profession in this the nineteenth century ; many and eminent the individuals emanating from these various sources ; earnest and incessant their efforts to cultivate and advance one or more branches of that tree of knowledge all would fain adorn; yet, as a community-as a profession—the truth cannot be hidden, we are a disunited querulous body, split into factions warring against each other, and have hence become in many respects a degenerate hybrid race.

In no given space of time have so great advances been made in every department of medicine as

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during the last forty years; yet has there been no corresponding union and elevation of medical practitioners, but rather the reverse. Whence then arises this anomaly? what are its causes, its effects, and its remedy? This, although a bold and, some may deem, a rash inquiry, is one I would confidently trust, in some measure at least, to answer; and whilst year after year, bills are advanced from different sections and authorities of the profession, having for their chief and general object the production of a uniformity in medical education and qualification, I would urge the necessity of some other very necessary reform, ere the members of that one profession can assume a just position as regards the public or each other.

Many years of careful observation and reflection have given ample proof that, although this uniformity of education and qualification is good and essential, and though the proposal I would make will doubtless, by the invasion of existing interests, meet an opposition proportioned to the interests invaded, yet is it with a deep and increasing conviction I assert, that a radical change must also be effected in the MODE OF PRACTICE AND REMUNERATION ere the desired aim of unity and elevation can ever be attained. Here is the true barrier to our advancement. Such dangers and difficulties surround the consideration of this question from within and from without from the profession and the public

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