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OPINIONS OF THE PRESS.

FIRST EDITION.

“The remedies proposed by the author are the union of the different branches of the profession into one body; the separation of Pharmacy from the practice of Medicine, including Surgery and Midwifery; and the education and compulsory examination of Pharmaceutists. All these points are worked out with great care and perspicuity, and we direct attention to the whole work, as one abounding in accurate knowledge, lofty purpose, and soundness of judgment.”—Medical Times and Gazette.

A Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons treats learnedly of the corruptions and divisions of medicine in England and Wales, investigating their causes and effects, and seeking their remedy. He regards the existing division of the medical profession into physicians, surgeons, and apothecaries, as arising from three great periods of corruption in medicine.

The first great period of corruption began with the invasion of medicine by priests and monks, during the sixth and seventh centuries. From the seventh to the sixteenth century, medicine was allied with priests and monks—the period of priestphysicians. In 1518, medicine was emancipated from priests and monks, and the pure physician appeared. The second great period of corruption began with the invasion of medicine by barbers, during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. From the thirteenth to the eighteenth century, medicine was allied with barbers—the period of the barber-surgeon. In 1745, medicine was emancipated from barbers, and the pure surgeon appeared. The third great period of corruption began with the invasion of medicine by apothecaries in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. From the eighteenth century to the present time medicine has been allied with apothecaries—the period of the apothecary-physician. Purity and unity of Medicine is sought for, and to obtain this medicine must be emancipated from apothecaries, and united with surgery under one common denomination. This course, according to our author, is the only remedial measure for the present corruptions and divisions in medicine.”Ranking's Half-yearly Abstract.

“A well-written and interesting work to which we shall again recur.”-Medico-Chirurgical Review.

“ We thank the author for this erudite contribution to our literature.”—Medical Circular.

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“Le livre n'a rien du pamphlet, mais il est d'une lecture attachante; il fourmille de citations curieuses, de textes des vielles chartes, d'anecdotes, de réflexions d'humoriste, et en apprend plus que ne feraient tous les traités dogmatiques sur l'état présent de la medecine dans le Royaume-Uni.

Nous suivons avec trop d'intérêt l'evolution des idées qui touchent aux principes professionnels, et nous sommes trop convaincus qu'on a toujours à profiter d'un mouvement auquel même on semble demeurer étranger pour nous en tenir à un si court énoncé et pour ne pas tirer d'autre parti de ces précieux matériaux.”--Archives Gen. de Med.

“Great learning and research are displayed in this valuble contribution to the controversy now proceeding, and we recommend its perusal by all interested in the question at issue. To Members of Parliament we especially recommend the reading of this volume. It will give them a mass of valuable information on a subject upon which they are now legislating with, we fear, very imperfect knowledge. They will not find it dull or tedious. On the contrary, it is extremely amusing, and will pleasantly employ two or three leisure hours. They will learn more from it than from many more ponderous and prosy volumes, which too often throw darkness rather than light upon the topics they treat.” – Critic.

PRINTED BY J. E. ADLARD, BARTHOLOMEW CLOSE.

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“It would be unjust to conclude this notice without saying a few words in favour of Mr. Churchill, from whom the profession is receiving, it may be truly said, the most beautiful series of Illustrated Medical Works which has ever been published.”—Lancet.

All the publications of Mr. Churchill are prepared with so much taste and neatness, that it is superfluous to speak of them in terms of commendation.” — - Edinburgh Medical and Surgical Journal.

“No one is more distinguished for the elegance and recherché style of his publica. tions than Mr. Churchill." - Provincial Medical Journal.

The name of Churchill has long been a guarantee for the excellence of illustrated works, and it would be superfluous to repeat the admiration that we have several times expressed in this respect, of the spirit with which this firm engages in these costly but valuable series.”—Medical Press and Circular.

The typography, illustrations, and getting up are, in all Mr. Churchill's publi. cations, most beautiful.”—Monthly Journal of Medical Science.

“Mr. Churchill's illustrated works are among the best that emanate from the Medical Press.”-Medical Times.

“We have before called the attention of both students and practitioners to the great advantage which Mr. Churchill has conferred on the profession, in the issue, at such moderate cost, of works so highly creditable in point of artistic execution and scientific merit.”Dublin Quarterly Journal.

century to the present time medicine has been allied with apothecaries--the period of the apothecary-physician. Purity and unity of Medicine is sought for, and to obtain this medicine must be emancipated from apothecaries, and united with surgery under one common denomination. This course, according to our author, is the only remedial measure for the present corruptions and divisions in medicine.”Ranking's Half-yearly Abstract.

“A well-written and interesting work to which we shall again recur.”—Medico-Chirurgical Review.

“ We thank the author for this erudite contribution to our literature.”—Medical Circular.

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“Le livre n'a rien du pamphlet, mais il est d'une lecture attachante; il fourmille de citations curieuses, de textes des vielles chartes, d'anecdotes, de réflexions d'humoriste, et en apprend plus que ne feraient tous les traités dogmatiques sur l'état présent de la medecine dans le Royaume-Uni.

Nous suivons avec trop d'intérêt l'evolution des idées qui touchent aux principes professionnels, et nous sommes trop convaincus qu'on a toujours à profiter d'un mouvement auquel même on semble demeurer étranger pour nous en tenir à un si court énoncé et pour ne pas tirer d'autre parti de ces précieux matériaux.”—Archives Gen. de Med.

“Great learning and research are displayed in this valuble con. tribution to the controversy now proceeding, and we recommend its perusal by all interested in the question at issue. To Members of Parliament we especially recommend the reading of this volume. It will give them a mass of valuable information on a subject upon which they are now legislating with, we fear, very imperfect knowledge. They will not find it dull or tedious. On the contrary, it is extremely amusing, and will pleasantly employ two or three leisure hours. They will learn more from it than from many more ponderous and prosy volumes, which too often throw darkness rather than light upon the topics they treat.”—Critic.

PRINTED BY J. E. ADLARD, BARTHOLOMEW CLOSE.

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MESSRS. CHURCHILL & SONS’

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“It would be unjust to conclude this notice without saying a few words in favour of Mr. Churchill, from whom the profession is receiving, it may be truly said, the most beautiful series of Illustrated Medical Works which has ever been published.”—Lancet.

All the publications of Mr. Churchill are prepared with so much taste and neatness, that it is superfluous to speak of them in terms of commendation.” —

- Edinburgh Medical and Surgical Journal.

“No one is more distinguished for the elegance and recherché style of his publica. tions than Mr. Churchill." - Provincial Medical Journal.

“The name of Churchill has long been a guarantee for the excellence of illustrated works, and it would be superfluous to repeat the admiration that we have several times expressed in this respect, of the spirit with which this firm engages in these costly but valuable series.”—Medical Press and Circular.

The typography, illustrations, and getting up are, in all Mr. Churchill's publi. cations, most beautiful.”—Monthly Journal of Medical Science.

“Mr. Churchill's illustrated works are among the best that emanate from the Medical Press.”—Medical Times.

“We have before called the attention of both students and practitioners to the great advantage which Mr. Churchill has conferred on the profession, in the issue, at such moderate cost, of works so highly creditable in point of artistic execution and scientific merit."-Dublin Quarterly Journal.

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