Ancient and Modern Scottish Songs, Heroic Ballads, Etc, Volume 2

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Kerr & Richardson, 1869 - Ballads, English
 

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Page 196 - I look'd for Jamie back; But the wind it blew high, and the ship it was a wrack His ship it was a wrack — why didna Jamie dee ? Or...
Page 77 - I'll part wi' my wife by my fae, Or I part wi' my land. Your tocher it fall be good, There's nane fall ha'e its maik, The lafs bound in her fnood, And Crummie wha kens her flake : With an auld bedden o' claiths, Was left me by my mither, They're jet black o'er wi' flaes, Ye may cuddle in them the gither.
Page 49 - Tullochgorum ? May choicest blessings still attend Each honest open-hearted friend, And calm and quiet be his end, And a' that's good watch o'er him ! May peace and plenty be his lot, Peace and plenty, peace and plenty, May peace and plenty be his lot, And dainties a great store o...
Page 23 - They only saw the cloud of night, They only heard the roar of Yarrow ! No longer from thy window look, Thou hast no son, thou tender mother ! No longer walk, thou lovely maid ! Alas, thou hast no more a brother ! No longer seek him east or west...
Page 42 - Be sure ye dinna quat the grip Of ilka joy when ye are young, Before auld age your vitals nip, And lay ye twafald o'er a rung. Sweet youth's a...
Page 62 - Tis I, my love, and no one near; Step gently down, you've nought to fear, With Jockey to the fair.' Step gently down, &c. 'My dad and mam are fast asleep, My brother's up, and with the sheep; And will you still your promise keep, Which I have heard you swear? And will you ever constant prove?' 'I will, by all the powers above, And ne'er deceive my charming dove; Dispel these doubts, and haste, my love, With Jockey to the fair.
Page 191 - Say often what they never mean, Ne'er mind their pretty lying tongue, But tent the language of their een: If these agree, and she persist To answer all your love with hate. Seek elsewhere to be better blest, And let her sigh when 'tis too late. ROGER Kind Patie, now fair fa' your honest heart, — Ye 're ay sae cadgy, and have sic an art To hearten ane!
Page 108 - Jeany's face May caufe mae men to rue, And that may gar me fay, alas ! But what's that to you ? Conceal thy beauties if thou can, Hide that fweet face of thine, That I may only be the man Enjoys thefe looks divine. O do not proftitute, my dear, Wonders to common view, And I with faithful heart fhall fwear, For ever to be true.
Page 23 - His mother from the window look'd, With all the longing of a mother; His little sister weeping walk'd The greenwood path to meet her brother : They sought him east, they sought him west, They sought him all the Forest thorough; They only saw the cloud of night, They only heard the roar of Yarrow.
Page 7 - Amend thy life and follies past; For but thou amend thee of thy life, That rope must be thy end at last.

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