The Lives of Celebrated Travellers, Volume 2

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H. Colburn and R. Bently, 1831 - Travelers
 

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Page 44 - A fire devoureth before them; and behind them a flame burneth: the land is as the garden of Eden before them, and behind them a desolate wilderness; yea, and nothing shall escape them.
Page 92 - I was so struck with admiration, that I could not for some time speak to her, being wholly taken up in gazing. That surprising harmony of features! that charming result of the whole! that exact proportion of body ! that lovely bloom of complexion unsullied by art! the unutterable enchantment of her smile! But her eyes ! large and black, with all the soft languishment of the blue ! every turn of her face discovering some new grace.
Page 304 - Though a mere private Briton, I triumphed here, in my own mind, over kings and their armies; and every comparison was leading nearer and nearer to presumption, when the place itself where I stood, the object of my vain-glory, suggested what depressed my short-lived triumphs.
Page 89 - The great ladies seldom let their gallants know who they are ; and 'tis so difficult to find it out, that they can very seldom guess at her name, whom they have corresponded with for above half a year together. You may easily imagine...
Page 88 - ... their fancies ; some putting flowers, others a plume of heron's feathers, and, in short, what they please; but the most general fashion is a large bouquet of jewels, made like natural flowers; that is, the buds, of pearl; the roses, of different coloured rubies; the jessamines, of diamonds; the jonquils, of topazes, etc., so well set and enamelled, 'tis hard to imagine any thing of that kind so beautiful. The hair hangs at its full length behind, divided into tresses braided with pearl or ribbon,...
Page 288 - I saw, with the utmost astonishment, two pieces, thicker and longer than our ordinary beefsteaks, cut out of the higher part of the buttock of the beast. How it was done I cannot positively say, because, judging the cow was to be killed from the moment I saw the knife drawn, I was not anxious to view that catastrophe, which was by no means an object of curiosity. Whatever way it was done, it surely was adroitly, and the two pieces were spread upon the outside of one of their shields.
Page 100 - THE playful smiles around the dimpled mouth, That happy air of majesty and truth, So would I draw : but oh ! 'tis vain to try ; My narrow genius does the power deny. The equal lustre of the heavenly mind, Where every grace with every virtue's...
Page 44 - ... they heaped up therein heath, stubble, and such like combustible matter, which were severally set on fire upon the approach of the locusts. But this was all to no purpose ; for the trenches were quickly filled up, and the fires extinguished -by infinite swarms succeeding one another ; whilst the front was regardless of danger, and the rear pressed on so close, that a retreat was altogether impossible.
Page 87 - The first part of my dress is a pair of drawers, very full, that reach to my shoes, and conceal the legs more modestly than your petticoats.
Page 132 - The huntsmen proceed to a large plain, or rather desert, near the sea-side : they have hawks and greyhounds ; the former carried in the usual manner, on the hand of the huntsman ; the latter led in a leash by a horseman, generally the same who carries the hawk. When the antelope is seen, they endeavour to get as near as possible ; but the animal, the moment it observes them, goes off at a rate that seems swifter than the wind ; the horsemen are instantly at full speed, having slipped the dogs.

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