Women Writing in India: 600 B.C. to the early twentieth century

Front Cover
Susie J. Tharu, Ke Lalita
Feminist Press at CUNY, 1991 - Literary Collections - 576 pages
4 Reviews
These ground-breaking collections offer 200 texts from eleven languages, never before available in English or as a collection, along with a new reading of cultural history that draws on contemporary scholarship on women and India. This extraordinary body of literature and important documentary resource illuminates the lives of Indian women through 2,600 years of change and extends the historical understanding of literature, feminism, and the making of modern India. The biographical, critical, and bibliographical headnotes in both volumes, supported by an introduction which Anita Desai describes as "intellectually rigorous, challenging, and analytical," place the writers and their selections within the context of Indian culture and history.

Volume I: 600 B.C. to the Early Twentieth Century includes songs by Buddhist nuns, testimonies of medieval rebel poets and court historians, and the voices of more than sixty other writers of the eighteenth- and nineteenth-centuries. Among the diverse selections are a rare early essay by an untouchable woman; an account by the first feminist historian; and a selection from the first novel written in English by an Indian woman.
 

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Women Writing in India: 600 B.C. to the Present, V: 600 B.C. to the Early Twentieth Century

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This volume is an enlightened and lengthy project--locating, identifying, and translating Indian women's writings produced over 2500 years. The research is painstaking and the selections of almost ... Read full review

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it is a wonderful research book on feminism
having a sea of knowledge

Contents

V
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VI
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VII
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VIII
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IX
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X
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XI
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XIII
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CXIV
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CXV
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CXIX
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CXXI
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LXXXI
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CLXXIX
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CLXXX
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CLXXXIII
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CLXXXIV
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CLXXXV
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CLXXXVI
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CLXXXIX
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CXC
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CXCV
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CXCVI
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CXCVII
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CXCVIII
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CXCIX
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CC
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CCI
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CCII
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Page 24 - Britain ; to that literature the brightest, the purest, the most durable of all the glories of our country ; to that literature so rich in precious truth and precious fiction ; to that literature which boasts of the prince of all poets and of the prince of all philosophers ; to that literature which has exercised an influence wider than that of our commerce, and mightier than that of our arms...
Page 17 - Thus each generation of women writers has found itself, in a sense, without a history, forced to rediscover the past anew, forging again and again the consciousness of their sex.
Page 15 - Books by women are treated as though they themselves were women, and criticism embarks, at its happiest, upon an intellectual measuring of busts and hips.
Page 19 - Sandra Gilbert and Susan Gubar, The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1979). Margaret Homans, Bearing the Word: Language and Female Experience in Nineteenth-Century Women's Writing (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1986). Nancy Armstrong, Desire and Domestic Fiction. (Ferris notes the 'gap' constituted by Scott in Armstrong's account: see p.

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