The International Quarterly, Volume 5

Front Cover
Frederick Albert Richardson
Fox, Duffield, 1902 - Political science
 

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Page 130 - The patrimony of a poor man lies in the strength and dexterity of his hands ; and to hinder him from employing this strength and dexterity in what manner he thinks proper, without injury to his neighbor, is a plain violation of this most sacred property.
Page 210 - Come lift thine eyes to lofty rhymes, Of things with things, of times with times, Primal chimes of sun and shade, Of sound and echo, man and maid, The land reflected in the flood, Body with shadow still pursued. For Nature beats in perfect tune, And rounds with rhyme here every rune, Whether she work in land or sea, Or hide underground her alchemy.
Page 502 - It is of course too early to forecast the means of attaining this last result; but the policy of the Government of the United States is to seek a solution which may bring about permanent safety and peace to China, preserve Chinese territorial and administrative entity, protect all rights guaranteed to friendly powers by treaty and international law, and safeguard for the world the principle of equal and impartial trade with all parts of the Chinese Empire.
Page 453 - I've made her eyes all right and blue, Can't I take breath and try to add life's flash, And then add soul and heighten them three-fold ? Or say...
Page 221 - Nay, more ! in death's despite, The crippled skeleton learned to write. "Dear mother," at first, of course ; and then "Dear captain," inquiring about the men. Captain's answer : "Of eighty-and-five, Giffen and I are left alive.
Page 222 - My heart shall be thine." Do vou ask how I live in the Valley? I weep — and I dream — and I pray. But my tears are as sweet as the dewdrops That fall on the roses in May ; And my prayer like a perfume from Censers, Ascendeth to God night and day.
Page 221 - I WALK down the Valley of Silence — Down the dim, voiceless valley — alone! And I hear not the fall of a footstep Around me, save God's and my own; And the hush of my heart is as holy As hovers where angels have flown! Long ago was I weary of voices Whose music my heart could not win; Long ago was I weary of noises That fretted my soul with their din; Long ago was I weary of places Where I met but the human— and sin.
Page 257 - Should such an order come at this moment," he said, in a letter previously written to the admiralty, "it would be a case for some consideration, whether Minorca is to be risked, or the two kingdoms of Naples and Sicily: I rather think my decision would be to risk the former.
Page 221 - I'll write, if spared!" There was news of the fight: But none of Giffen — he did not write. I sometimes fancy that, were I king Of the princely knights of the Golden Ring, With the song of the minstrel in mine ear, And the tender legend that trembles here, I'd give the best, on his bended knee, The whitest soul of my chivalry, For Little Giffen of Tennessee.
Page 648 - I direct that in the election of a student to a scholarship regard shall be had to (i) his literary and scholastic attainments; (2) his fondness for and success in manly outdoor sports such as cricket, football and the like; (3) his qualities of manhood, truth, courage, devotion to duty, sympathy for and protection of the weak, kindliness, unselfishness and fellowship; and (4) his exhibition during school days of moral force of character and of instincts to lead and to take an interest in his schoolmates...

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