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THE JUNIOR WARDEN'S SONG.

[Bro. J. E. CARPENTER, P.M.]
The junior warden calls
The Masons from their labour,

And each is free

To join with me,
And drink unto his neighbour.

Fill the glass,
Let it

pass,
Beaming with a temperate glow,

Till the clocks

And the knocks
Tell us it is time to go!
The

sun in heaven's high arch
Beams somewhere or another,

For, though 'tis night,
We know

his light
Sets never on a brother.

Fill the glass, &c.
And though we work by rule,
All work would be but folly.

A time for play

Comes every day,
And we may now be jolly!

Fill the glass, &c.
We know no civil broils
To mar our social greetings,

The mason kicks

All politics
Away from all his meetings.

Fill the glass, &c.
And ere we part to night,
No Mason here afraid is

To drink the toast

He loves the most,
So, here's unto the ladies !

Fill the glass, &c.

Should any fair one ask
Our secrets, her we'll bow to,

A Mason's zeal

Her lips will seal,
The best way he knows how to.

Fill the glass, &c.

And if she's wiser then,
This fact her mind will dwell in,

A Mason proves

To her he loves
There is no “ kiss and telling."

Fill the glass, &c.

Then here's a health to all
Who're in this circle seated;

May all meet here

For many a year,
To hear this song repeated.

Fill the glass, &c.

INSTALLATION SONG.

[Bro. J. E. CARPENTER, P.M.]
Our lodge it is squared,

And our master is chair’d,
Let us hail him once more in his station;

Now the banquet is stored,

And the wine it is pour'd, To do honour to his installation.

An apprentice at first

In the craft he was nursed, And taught in morality's college,

That the best way to rise,

Was to, early, be wise, And that truth was the right road to knowledge.

As fellow craft, too,

Soon his wages he drew, By experience put a good face on;

His progress was praised,

And thus he got raised,
And turn'd out a good master Mason.

Your warden he's been

Where he ever was seen,
At home in the west every meeting;

The level display'd,

How well he obey'd
Every sign, every summons and greeting.

And now the reward

That past labours afford, Ile has gain'd, -and how few gain it faster !

Thus all brothers who please,

May get on-by degrees,
And in time may become a past master.

May he long live to grace

His position and place, Doing honour to his exaltation ;

And we'll ne'er rue the day

That we vow'd to obey And to celebrate his installation.

THE TRUTHS OF MASONRY.

[Bro. J. E. CARPENTER, P.M.]
When first I hail'd the sacred craft,

I knew no cheering ray,
To guide me through life's mazy path

Or warn me on my way;
A pilgrim through the realm of gloom

With careless steps I pass'd,
And little cared I for my doom,
Till light was o'er me cast.

N

266

THE BOOK OF POPULAR SONGS.

I stood alone and friendless there,

And helpless as a child,
A wanderer on an alien shore,

Forsaken and reviled.
A lonely lot I often knew,

But lonelier felt I then,
Till found I Masons, brothers too,

And found those brothers—men!

The mystic veil was drawn aside,

And to my view display'd
The symbols that true Masons guide,

That precepts wise pervade.
And never since that blessed dawn

Of sacred light to me,
Did e'er I seek to slight or scorn

The truths of Masonry.

INDEX.

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PATRIOTIC SONGS.

PAGE
Dear old mother England

59
Fill a goblet, merry folk

215
Hail to thee, England !- blest isle of the ocean

176
Here's a health to old honest John Bull

161
I love my little native isle

104
Land of the loyal and isle of the free
My ancestors were Englishmen, and Englishman am I 111
Rouse, ye lovers of peace and of order
The sailor boasts his stately ship...

54
The peasantry of England

84
There's a good time coming, boys

135
The merry bells of England, how I love to hear them sound 148
Where is the Briton's home ?

170
When Vulcan forged the bolts of Jove
When mighty roast beef was the Englishman's food

NAVAL AND MILITARY.
A life on the ocean wave

168
Blow high, blow low, let tempests tear

6
Cheer, boys, cheer ! no more of idle sorrow

141
Come, cheer up, my lads ! 'tis to glory we steer

201
Fill
up,
fill
up your mystic fires

109
far upon the sea

143
He comes from wars, from the red field of fight

243
How gallantly, how merrily...

41
Jack Steadfast and I were both messmates at sea... 240
Loud roar'd the dreadful thunder

13
List ! list to the storm ! see the dark frowning sky

125
March to the battle-field

191
No fish stir in our evening net

251
On Linden, when the sun was low
Peaceful slumb'ring on the ocean

249
Soldier, wake-the day is peeping

246
Stand to your guns, my hearts of oak

153
See you beneath yon cloud so dark

12
The moonbeams cast a holy light

133

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