The English Church, from the Accession of George I. to the End of the Eighteenth Century (1714-1800)

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Macmillan and Company, Limited, 1906 - Church and state - 374 pages

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Page 196 - A messenger of grace to guilty men. Behold the picture ! — Is it like ? — Like whom ? The things that mount the rostrum with a skip, And then skip down again : pronounce a text, Cry, hem ! and, reading -what they never wrote Just fifteen minutes, huddle up their work, And with a well-bred whisper close the scene.
Page 232 - And the same John had his raiment of camel's hair, and a leathern girdle about his loins ; and his meat was locusts and wild honey. Then went out to him Jerusalem, and all Judaea, and all the region round about Jordan, and were baptized of him in Jordan, confessing their sins.
Page 344 - Ireland ; and that the doctrine, worship, discipline, and government of the said united church shall be and shall remain in full force for ever, as the same are now by law established for the church of England ; and that the continuance and preservation of the said united church, as the established church of England and Ireland...
Page 3 - A GENERAL SURVEY OF THE HISTORY OF THE CANON OF THE NEW TESTAMENT DURING THE fIRST FOUR CENTURIES. Fourth Edition. With Preface on "Supernatural Religion.
Page 59 - ... intemperance, and fearlessness of committing crimes, in the lower, as must, if this torrent of impiety stop not, become absolutely fatal." He further asserts that " Christianity is ridiculed and railed at with very little reserve, and the teachers of it without any at all;" and this testimony was made but one year before that which is commemorated as the epoch of Methodism.
Page 313 - Indian scholars and missionaries ; where he most exorbitantly proposes a whole hundred pounds a year for himself, forty pounds for a fellow, and ten for a student. His heart will break if his deanery be not taken from him, and left to your Excellency's disposal. I discouraged him, by the coldness of Courts and Ministers, who will interpret all this as impossible, and a vision, but nothing will do...
Page 233 - York (Philadelphia, 1940) examines the efforts of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel and the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge...
Page 257 - I reduced the study of divinity into as narrow a compass as I could, for I determined to study nothing but my Bible, being much unconcerned about the opinions of councils, fathers, churches, bishops, and other men, as little inspired as myself.
Page 196 - Would I describe a preacher, such as Paul, Were he on Earth, would hear, approve, and own, Paul should himself direct me. I would trace His master-strokes, and draw from his design. I would express him simple, grave, sincere ; In doctrine uncorrupt; in language plain, And plain in manner; decent, solemn, chaste And natural in gesture ; much impress'd Himself, as conscious of his awful charge, And anxious mainly that the flock he feeds May feel it too...
Page 112 - It is come, I know not how, to be taken for granted, by many persons, that Christianity is not so much as a subject of inquiry ; but that it is, now at length, discovered to be fictitious.

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