The Popular History of England, Volume 1

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Page 602 - And he knew it, and said, It is my son's coat; an evil beast hath devoured him; Joseph is without doubt rent in pieces.
Page 523 - Because a great part of the people, and especially of workmen and servants, late died of the pestilence, many seeing the necessity of masters, and great scarcity of servants, will not serve unless they may receive excessive wages...
Page 72 - The barbarians drive us to the sea; the sea throws us back on the barbarians; thus two modes of death await us; we are either slain or drowned.
Page 388 - And a villein shall be amerced after the same manner, saving to him his wainage, if he falls under our mercy ; and none of the aforesaid amerciaments shall be assessed but by the oath of honest men in the neighbourhood.
Page 285 - By its own weight made steadfast and immovable. Looking tranquillity! It strikes an awe And terror on my aching sight; the tombs And monumental caves of death look cold, And shoot a chillness to my trembling heart.
Page 435 - Sir, this is a novel idea. At the time when these measures were before Congress in 1850, when the questions involved in them were discussed from day to day, from week to week, and from month to month...
Page 240 - Conqueror, built the Tower of London; to wit, the great white and square tower there, about the year of Christ 1078, appointing Gundulph, then Bishop of Rochester, to be principal surveyor and overseer of that work, who was for that time lodged in the house of Edmere, a burgess of London...
Page 236 - Then after we had staid there three hours, or thereabouts, we might perceive the deer appear on the hills round about us (their heads making a show like a wood), which being followed close by the...
Page 585 - ... years, governed them very badly and very rigorously, and in so much that they are not well contented therewith. But if it please our Lord, I will help you to govern them better than they have been governed in time past." King Richard then answered him, "Fair cousin, since it pleaseth you, it pleaseth us well.
Page 106 - I labour much. I go out at day-break, urging the oxen to the field, and I yoke them to the plough (the pyl). It is not yet so stark winter that I dare keep close at home, for fear of my lord...

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