The Yale Literary Magazine, Volume 18, Issue 4

Front Cover
Herrick & Noyes, 1853

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 126 - Arches on arches ! as it were that Rome, Collecting the chief trophies of her line, Would build up all her triumphs in one dome, Her Coliseum stands ; the moonbeams shine As 'twere its natural torches, for divine Should be the light which streams here, to illume This long-explored but still exhaustless mine Of contemplation ; and the azure gloom Of an Italian night, where the deep skies assume Hues which have words, and speak to ye of heaven, Floats o'er this vast and wondrous monument, And shadows...
Page 150 - A dungeon horrible, on all sides round, As one great furnace, flamed; yet from those flames No light; but rather darkness visible Served only to discover sights of woe, Regions of sorrow, doleful shades, where peace And rest can never dwell ; hope never comes That comes to all ; but torture without end Still urges, and a fiery deluge, fed With ever-burning sulphur unconsumed.
Page 150 - Here we may reign secure, and in my choice To reign is worth ambition, though in Hell: Better to reign in Hell, than serve in Heaven.
Page 147 - Hast thou a charm to stay the morning-star In his steep course? So long he seems to pause On thy bald awful head, O sovran BLANC, The Arve and Arveiron at thy base Rave ceaselessly; but thou, most awful Form! Risest from forth thy silent sea of pines, How silently! Around thee and above Deep is the air and dark, substantial, black, An ebon mass: methinks thou piercest it, As with a wedge! But when...
Page 125 - While stands the Coliseum, Rome shall stand; 'When falls the Coliseum, Rome shall fall; 'And when Rome falls — the World.
Page 148 - The day is done ; and slowly from the scene The stooping sun upgathers his spent shafts, And puts them back into his golden quiver...
Page 154 - Segnius irritant animos demissa per aurem Quam quae sunt oculis subjecta fidelibus et quae Ipse sibi tradit spectator.
Page 128 - rapt fancy deemeth it A metaphor of peace ;— all form a scene Where musing Solitude might love to lift Her soul above this sphere of earthliness ; Where silence undisturbed might watch alone, So cold, so bright, so still...
Page 140 - There must be nothing like it in the heavens above nor in the earth beneath nor in the waters under the earth ; and in many cases there is not.
Page 159 - Every Freshman is obliged to do any proper Errand or Message, required of him by any one in an upper class, which if he shall refuse to do, he shall be punished.

Bibliographic information