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Books Books 1 - 8 of 8 on Scheme stands as follows : — A. Fortresses partly inaccessible by reason of precipices,....
" Scheme stands as follows : — A. Fortresses partly inaccessible by reason of precipices, cliffs, or water, defended in part only by artificial works. B. Fortresses on hill-tops with artificial defences, following the natural line of the hill. "
Proceedings - Page 83
by Somersetshire Archaeological and Natural History Society - 1904
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Archaeologia Cambrensis

Wales - 1904
...by reason of precipices, cliffs, or water, additionally defended by artificial banks or walls, в. Fortresses on hill-tops with artificial defences, following the natural line of the hill ; Or, though usually on high ground, less dependent on natural slopes for protection. c. Rectangular...
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Journal of the British Archaeological Association, Volume 10

Archaeology - 1904
...past, long anterior to his own era. Next in order in the Earthwork Committee's scheme we find : — " Fortresses on hill-tops, with artificial defences following the natural line of the hill." Such an one you have at WINCOBANK. Much time could be occupied in talking about this commanding...
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The Antiquary, Volume 40

Edward Walford, John Charles Cox, George Latimer Apperson - Archaeology - 1904
...inaccessible, by reason of precipices, cliffs, or water, additionally defended by artificial banks or walls. B. Fortresses on hill-tops with artificial defences, following the natural line of the hill ; or, though usually on high ground, less dependent on natural slopes for protection. c. Rectangular...
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Proceedings

Somersetshire Archaeological and Natural History Society - Archaeology - 1905
...which is the only accessible point, being connected with an outlying branch of the Mendip range. (See Photographs, Plate II.) Small Down comes under the...artificial defences following the natural line of the hill."2 The camp ( See Plan, Plate I ) takes the form of an irregular elongated oval, being broader...
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Proceedings

Somersetshire Archaeological and Natural History Society - Archaeology - 1906
...cliffs, or water, additionally defended by artificial works, usually known as promontory fortresses. B. Fortresses on hill-tops with artificial defences, following the natural line of the hill ; Or, though usually on high ground, less dependent on natural slopes for protection. c. Rectangular...
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Proceedings, Volume 53

Somersetshire Archaeological and Natural History Society - Archaeology - 1908
...Class B of the classification of Defensive Works drawn up by the Congress of Archaeological Societies, viz., " Fortresses on hill-tops with artificial defences following the natural line of the hill." Small Down Camp, near Evercreech,4 5^ miles to the SE of Maesbury, may be regarded as a finer...
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Ancient earthworks

James Charles Wall - Social Science - 1908 - 143 pages
...having an entrance ingeniously contrived at its southern extremity. FIG. 2o.-0kehampton. CLASS B(i). Fortresses on Hill-tops with Artificial Defences, following the natural line of the hill. All primitive peoples sought high ground for warlike contests, from which they could look down...
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The Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Magazine, Volume 33

Archaeology - 1904
...Dorchester, Oxfordshire. Cleeve Camp, Gloucestershire.* * See plans on following pages. CLASS B. '""/-, Fortresses on hill-tops with artificial defences, following the natural line of the hill, eg — Mam Tor, Derbyshire.* J1/^ Cadbury (near Wincanton), Somersetshire. Hambledon Hill, Dorsetshire....
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