History of the Colony and Ancient Dominion of Virginia

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Lippincott, 1860 - Virginia - 749 pages
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Contents

London Company George Sandys Treasurer Wyat
149
Dissolution of Charter of Virginia Company Earl of South
169
Royal Government established in Virginia Yeardley Gover
179
Maryland settled Contest between Clayborne and Lord Bal
187
Virginia during Harveys Administration He is recalled
193
Virginia during the Civil War of England Berkley Go vernor Kemp Governor
199
Virginia during the Commonwealth of England Bennet Governor
210
Maryland during the Protectorate
222
Virginia during the Protectorate Digges Governor Matthews Governor
233
Virginia under Richard Cromwell and during the Interreg num Berkley Governor
240
Loyalty of Virginia Miscellaneous Affairs Morrison Governor Berkley Governor
249
Scarburghs Report of his Proceedings in establishing the Boundary Line between Virginia and Maryland The Bear and the Cub an extract from the A...
259
Miscellaneous Affairs
263
Berkleys Statistics of Virginia
271
Threatened Revolt
274
Rev Morgan Godwyns Account of the Condition of the Church in Virginia
277
Indian Disturbances Disaffection of Colonists
280
Bacons Rebellion
283
Bacons Rebellion continued
293
Bacons Rebellion continued
308
Closing Scenes of the Rebellion
313
Punishment of the Rebels Berkleys death Succeeded by Jeffreys
319
Chicheley Governor Culpepper Governor
326
Statistics of Virginia
331
Effingham Governor Death of Beverley Effinghams Corruption and Tyranny
335
William and Mary proclaimed College chartered An dros Governor
343
Condition of Virginia Powers of Governor Courts and State Officers Revenue
349
Administration of Andros Nicholson again Governor
356
Assembly held in the College Ceremony of Opening Go vernors Speech
364

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Page 118 - You did promise Powhatan what was yours should be his, and he the like to you; you called him father being in his land a stranger, and by the same reason so must I do you...
Page 273 - I thank God there are no free schools, nor printing, and I hope we shall not have these hundred years ; for learning has brought disobedience and heresy and sects into the world, and printing has divulged them, and libels against the best government. God keep us from both...
Page 493 - The supplicating tears of the women and moving petitions of the men melt me into such deadly sorrow, that I solemnly declare, if I know my own mind, I could offer myself a willing sacrifice to the butchering enemy, provided that would contribute to the people's ease.
Page 316 - «welcome ; I am more glad to see you than any man in Virginia. Mr. Drummond you shall be hanged in half an hour.
Page 133 - I that was wont to behold her riding like Alexander, hunting like Diana, walking like Venus, the gentle wind blowing her fair hair about her pure cheeks, like a nymph; sometime sitting in the shade like a Goddess; sometime singing like an angel; sometime playing like Orpheus. Behold the sorrow of this world! Once amiss, hath bereaved me of all.
Page 338 - I can never forget the inexpressible luxury and profaneness, gaming and all dissoluteness, and, as it were, total forgetfulness of God (it being Sunday evening), which this• day seven-night I was witness of: the King sitting and toying with his concubines, Portsmouth, Cleveland, and Mazarine, etc.
Page 616 - That these Resolves be in full force and virtue until instructions from the Provincial Congress regulating the jurisprudence of the province shall provide otherwise, or the legislative body of Great Britain resign its unjust and arbitrary pretensions with respect to America.
Page 99 - I'd divide And burn in many places ; on the topmast, The yards, and bowsprit, would I flame distinctly, Then meet and join. Jove's lightnings, the precursors O...
Page 218 - That Virginia shall be free from all taxes, customs and impositions whatsoever, and none to be imposed on them without consent of the Grand assembly; and soe that neither fforts nor castle bee erected or garrisons maintained without their consent.
Page 293 - No, may it please your honor, we will not hurt a hair of your head, nor of any other man's; we are come for a commission to save our lives from the Indians, which you have so often promised, and now we will have it before we go.

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