An Historical Syntax of the English Language

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Brill Archive, 2002 - Architecture - 31 pages
The aim of this study is to provide an outline of the development, from the earliest times to the present day, of all the English syntatical constructions with a verbal form as their nucleus. Professor Visser's description is based on a very extensive collection of documentary material covering every kind of writing in prose and poetry in the Old, Middle and Modern periods, drawing on quotations illustrating syntactical phenomena in Bosworth & Toller, O.E.D., M.M.E.D., E.D.D., and D.O.S.T., but also making reference to obsolete usages not found in any grammar, and to the views of English and American grammarians of the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries on the various syntactical constructions. The volumes of this work originally appeared in the early sixties and seventies and were well received by readers and reviewers. Volumes 1 and 2 underwent correction in the light of these early reactions. We should like to think that this work will continue to be available to the scholarly world without great increases in the price. We are however only reprinting the individual volumes in small numbers, and so we have decided that in order to guarantee a consistent reprint and pricing policy for the future, the work should be available henceforth only as a set of four volumes.
 

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Contents

Buchanan C R Syntax of Alfrics tr of the Vulgate Genesis Unpubl Diss Texas
xxiv
THE PRESENT TENSE FORM
661
B TIMESPHERE THE FUTURE
669
Futural Present 71722
678
Type Folke called vpon hym you fall you fallV 732
684
Futural can must may will and ought 736
692
In adverbial clauses not opening with conjunction 751
700
have done it versus before I shall have done it 754
702
Type She made as if to hide him 966
1019
Type This is a fouler thefte than for to breke a chirche 970
1026
After after at be for from into instead of of uponpurh till tofor without 976
1035
An adverb of time or place between to and its infinitive 980
1041
Type He find pleasure in doing good No my dear 985
1048
Type Swedish Foreign Minister To Quit 991 i54
1054
Type Be ye redy To al my lust And never ye to gruch it 993
1056
CHAPTER NINE
1065

Present tense in narratives as a variant of the Preterite 76079 705
726
Type Plato sailh the wordes mote be cosyn to the dede 7813
732
Type With noiseless steps she moved about the room lest she awake him 752 700
752
Type sume cwaedon he is crist 8212
770
Type Seiden that thes man hath not don ony thing worthi deeth 8268
779
CHAPTER SEVEN
786
Type bis ilk bok es translated in to Inglis 794 740
794
Type Si Gode lof 841
795
He arrived this evening versus he has arrived this evening 800 746
800
Type Ne ondrede du versus Ne ondred u 842
801
T never heard such at hing versus T have never heard such a thing 807 755
807
Type paet baette unlaerede ne dyrren underfon lareowdom 8502
810
Type 0 that I had wings 8123
814
Subject Clauses 8638
819
Object Clauses 86973
827
Attributive Clauses 876
859
Adverbial Clauses 87795
861
CHAPTER EIGHT
942
THE INFINITIVE AS SUBJECT
948
Type She wepte that pity was to here 902
954
Type It is nat good for to take the breed of sonys 909
960
Type It was semely to Pe for to folowe swych a rowte 913
967
Type All we can do is wish each other a Happy New Year 918
972
Type A figure of thynges to come 927
980
Type Fame did me the favour as to publish it presently 933
986
Type He was an easy man to yeve penaunce 941
993
Type He bore his sword to the cutlers to grinde 947
999
Type T have broke your hest to say so 953
1005
Type Would you not suppose Your bondage happy to be made a Queene? 956
1007
Type He was not man enough to confess the tuth 962
1013
Development of the various endings 101931
1079
THE FORM IN ING AS SUBJECT
1098
Type Brennende fyre soukynge childryn 1043
1105
Type Fallyng evil walking stick 1047
1112
THE FORM IN ING AS A PREDICATIVE ADJUNCT
1118
Type Tf she had the looking after me 1055
1125
Type The king hearing this was stupefact 1062
1132
Type They runnen to the apostle hus and carpand o that grisli crak 1071
1139
Type And knocking at the gate twas opend wide 1072
1140
THE ABSOLUTE ING ADJUNCT
1147
Type His hat being blown off hi s head chanced to fall into the court 1085
1160
Type Its a curious thing your saying that 10924
1168
Type T hope its all right me coming in 1102
1182
Type Restrayne yow of vengence taking 110814
1190
Type His lovemaking struck us as unconvincing 1117
1196
Type Wenches sitt in the shade singing of ballads 1121
1203
The reading the book versus the reading of the book 1124
1210
Type Pending the result I want you to remain 1125
1217
CHAPTER
1223
Past participle equivalent to form in ing 1130
1231
Type The wishedfor day had arrived 1136
1237
Type A mirour polisshed bright 1141
1244
Type He was worried a little 1145
1250
Type Thus repulsed our final hope is that despair 1149
1258
Middle English 11523
1264
Preceded by preposition 1156
1278
Type Us wanted nowper baken ne roste 1160
1284
Adverbial use of ago 1165
1290
THE PAST PARTICIPLE USED INDEPENDENTLY
1296
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