The Odyssey, with the hymns, epigrams, and Battle of the frogs and mice, tr. with notes by T.A. Buckley. [Preceded by] The life of Homer, attr. to Herodotus

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Page 124 - His spear, — to equal which, the tallest pine Hewn on Norwegian hills, to be the mast Of some great ammiral, were but a wand...
Page 144 - Whose waves of torrent fire inflame with rage. Far off from these, a slow and silent stream, Lethe, the river of oblivion, rolls Her watery labyrinth, whereof who drinks, Forthwith his former state and being forgets — Forgets both joy and grief, pleasure and pain.
Page 161 - Thus I spoke ; but he answered me not at all, but went to Erebus amongst the other souls of the deceased dead. There however, although angry, he would have spoken to me, or I to him, but my mind in my breast wished to behold the souls of the other dead. There then I beheld Minos, the illustrious son of Jove, having a golden sceptre, giving laws to the dead, sitting down ; but the others around him, the king, pleaded their causes, sitting and standing through the wide-gated house of Pluto. After him...
Page 158 - O Jove-born son of Laertes, much-contriving Ulysses, wretched one, why dost thou meditate a still greater work in thy mind ? how didst thou dare to descend to Orcus, where dwell the witless dead, the images of deceased mortals...
Page 376 - An ox-stealer should be both tall and strong, And I am but a little newborn thing, Who, yet at least, can think of nothing wrong: My business is to suck, and sleep, and fling The cradle-clothes about me all day long, Or, half asleep, hear my sweet mother sing, And to be washed in water clean and warm, And hushed and kissed and kept secure from harm.
Page 101 - And Tiresias and Phineus, prophets old: Then feed on thoughts, that voluntary move Harmonious numbers ; as the wakeful bird Sings darkling, and in shadiest covert hid Tunes her nocturnal note. Thus with the year...
Page 160 - Cetean companions were slain around him, on account of gifts to a woman : him certainly I beheld as the most beautiful, after divine Memnon. But when we, the chieftains of the Grecians, ascended into the horse which Epeus made, and all things were committed to me, both to open the thick ambush and to shut it, there the other leaders and rulers of the Greeks both wiped away their tears, and the limbs of each trembled under them ; but him I never saw at all with my eyes, either turning pale as to his...
Page 68 - ... the web, wove with a golden shuttle. But a flourishing wood sprung up around her grot, alder and poplar, and sweet-smelling cypress. There also birds with spreading wings slept, owls and hawks, and widetongued crows of the ocean, to which maritime employments are a care. There a vine in its prime was spread about the hollow grot, and it flourished with clusters. But four fountains flowed in succession with white water, turned near one another, each in different ways; but around there flourished...
Page 147 - ... turns back again from heaven to earth ; but pernicious night is spread over hapless mortals. Having come there, we drew up our ship ; and we took out the sheep ; and we ourselves went again to the stream of the ocean, until we came to the place which Circe mentioned. There Perimedes and...
Page 157 - ... having contrived death and Fate for me, slew me, conspiring with my pernicious wife, having invited me to his house, entertaining me at a feast, as any one has slain an ox at the stall. Thus I died by a most piteous death ; and my other companions were cruelly slain around me, as swine with white tusks, which are slain either at the marriage, or collation, or splendid banquet of a wealthy, very powerful man.

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