Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" But let the frame of things disjoint, both the worlds suffer, Ere we will eat our meal in fear, and sleep In the affliction of these terrible dreams, That shake us nightly : better be with the dead, Whom we, to gain our peace, have sent to peace, Than... "
The Book of Familiar Quotations: Being a Collection of Popular Extracts and ... - Page 40
1866 - 268 pages
Full view - About this book

Anglia, Volumes 65-68

Comparative linguistics - 1941 - 1098 pages
[ Sorry, this page's content is restricted ]
Snippet view - About this book

Macbeth, from the text of S. Johnson and G. Steevens, revised

William Shakespeare - 1784 - 116 pages
...whilst our poor Remains in danger of her former tooth. *But let the frame of things disjoint, both the w suffer, Ere we will eat our meal in fear, and sleep...nightly : better be with the dead, Whom we, to gain our place, have sent to peace*, Than on the torture of the mind to lie *In restless ecstacy. — Duncan...
Full view - About this book

Macbeth. King John

William Shakespeare - 1788 - 480 pages
...She'll close, and be herself ; whilst our poor malice Remains in danger of her former tooth. 171 Bu^ let the frame of things disjoint, both the worlds...Ere we will eat our meal in fear, and sleep In the affliftion of these terrible dreams, That shake us nightly : better be with the dead, Whom we, to gain...
Full view - About this book

The Plays of William Shakespeare, Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1803 - 558 pages
...malice Remains in clanger of her former tooth. But let The frame of things disjoint, both the Avorlds suffer, Ere we will eat our meal in fear, and sleep...nightly: Better be with the dead, Whom we, to gain our place, have sent to peace, Than on the torture of the mind to lie In restless ecstacy. Duncan is in...
Full view - About this book

The Plays of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from the Text ..., Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1803 - 412 pages
...former tooth. But let The frame of things disjoint, both the worlds suffer, * Most melancholy. B 2 Ere we will eat our meal in fear, and sleep In the...nightly : Better be with the dead, Whom we, to gain our place, have sent to peace, Than on the torture of the mind to lie In restless ecstacy.4 Duncan is in...
Full view - About this book

The plays of William Shakspeare, pr. from the text of the ..., Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1805 - 454 pages
...kill'd it; She'll close, and be herself; whilst our poor malice Remains in danger of her former tooth. But let The frame of things disjoint, both the worlds...nightly : Better be with the dead, Whom we, to gain our place, have sent to peace. Than on the torture of the mind to lie In restless ecstacy.2 Duncan is in...
Full view - About this book

The Plays of William Shakespeare : Accurately Printed from the ..., Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1805 - 442 pages
...kill'd it; She'll close, and be herself; whilst our poor malice Remains in danger of her former tooth. But let The frame of things disjoint, both the worlds...nightly : Better be with the dead, Whom we, to gain our place, have sent to peace, Than on the torture of the mind to lie In restless ecstacy.2 Duncan is in...
Full view - About this book

Remarks, Critical, Conjectural, and Explanatory, Upon the Plays of ...

E. H. Seymour - 1805 - 500 pages
...stoutness." Dr. Johnson's explanation is right, and has support in a kindred sentiment in Macbeth : " Let the frame of things disjoint, both the worlds suffer, " Ere we will eat our meal in fear," &c. 155. " Well, mildly be it then, mildly." This is defective : perhaps we might add, " Well mildly...
Full view - About this book

Notes Upon Some of the Obscure Passages in Shakespeare's Plays: With Remarks ...

John Howe Baron Chedworth - 1805 - 392 pages
...words I still doubt. P. 558.— 36l.— 464. Macb. Better be with the dead, Whom we, to gain our place, have sent to peace, Than on the torture of the mind to lie In restless ecstacy. Steevens is right. Sir W. Davenant has, In restless agony. P. 559.— 362. — *65. Macb. O, full of...
Full view - About this book

The Plays of William Shakespeare: With the Corrections and ..., Volume 7

William Shakespeare - 1806 - 434 pages
...Coriolanus, Act IV, sc. v: " i he scotched him and notch'd him like a carhonado." Steeiiem, * But let Ere we will eat our meal in fear, and sleep In the affliction of these terrihle dreams, That shake us nightly : Better he with the dead, Whom we, to gain our place, have...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF