History of the Romans Under the Empire, Volume 8

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Longman, Green, Longman, Roberts, & Green, 1865 - Rome - 453 pages
 

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Page 293 - Jus autem civile vel gentium ita dividitur : omnes populi, qui legibus et moribus reguntur, partim sUO proprio, partim communi omnium hominum jure utuntur : nam quod quisque populus ipse sibi jus constituit, id ipsius proprium civitatis est vocaturque jus civile, quasi jus proprium ipsius civitatis : quod vero naturalis ratio inter omnes homines constituit, id apud omnes populos perseque custoditur vocaturque jus gentium, quasi quo jure omnes gentes utuntur.
Page 147 - Adfirmabant autem hanc fuisse summam vel culpae suae vel erroris, quod essent soliti stato die ante lucem convenire carmenque Christo quasi deo dicere secum invicem seque sacramento non in scelus aliquod obstringere, sed ne furta, ne latrocinia, ne adulteria committerent, ne fidem fallerent, ne depositum appellati abnegarent.
Page 118 - You might have managed,' he said, ' not to lose these hours.' In fact, he thought all time lost which was not given to study. It was by this intense application that he completed so great a number of books, and left me, besides, a hundred and sixty volumes of extracts, written on both sides of the leaf, and in the minutest hand.
Page 209 - Per ea tempora et alias frequenter in plurimis locis, in quibus barbari non fluminibus sed limitibus dividuntur, stipitibus magnis in modum muralis saepis funditus iactis atque conexis barbaros separavit.
Page 109 - Had his body been as strong as his mind, this wish he would have effected with his own hand. God granted it, however ; and when he felt that he should die a free man, he burst through all the lesser ties which bound him to life. The malady which he had tried so long to relieve by temperance still increased. At last his firmness gave way. Two, three, four days passed, and he had refused all food. His wife, Hispulla. sent our friend Geminius to me, with the melancholy news that her husband had resolved...
Page 116 - ... for this is the discipline with which he struggles against old age. After the bath he takes his place at table, but puts off eating for a time, listening in the meanwhile to a little light and pleasant reading. All this time his friends are free to do as he does, or anything else they please. Dinner is then served, elegant and moderate, on plain but ancient silver. He uses Corinthian bronzes, too, and admires without being foolishly addicted to them. Players are often introduced between the courses,...
Page 293 - Quod vero naturalis ratio inter omnes homines constituit, id apud omnes populos peraeque custoditur, vocaturque j,us gentium, quasi quo jure omnes gentes utuntur (5).
Page 352 - ... developed in the third, but we have at least no evidence of them in the second. We may reasonably suppose, indeed, that there was a gradual, though slow, diminution in the amount of gold and silver in circulation. 'The result would be felt first in the provinces, and latest in the cities and Rome itself, but assuredly it was already in progress. Two texts of Pliny assert the constant drain of specie to the East; and the assertion is confirmed by the circumstances of the case ; for the Indians,...
Page 257 - But the merit of Hadrian is above all conspicuous in the decision with which, the first of Roman statesmen, he conceived the idea of governing the world as one homogeneous Empire.
Page 109 - ... increased. At last his firmness gave way. Two, three, four days passed, and he had refused all food. His wife, Hispulla, sent our friend Geminius to me, with the melancholy news that her husband had resolved to die, and would not be dissuaded by her prayers or her daughter's ; I alone could prevail upon him. I flew to him. I had almost reached the spot, when Atticus met me from Hispulla to say that even I could not now prevail, so fixed had become his determination. To his physician, indeed,...

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