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BELONGING TO

THE LOGANIAN LIBRARY:

TO WHICH IS PREFIXED

A SHORT ACCOUNT OF THE INSTITUTION,

WITH THE

LAW FOR ANNEXING THE SAID LIBRARY

TO THAT BELONGING TO

“ THE LIBRARY COMPANY OF PHILADELPHIA,"

AND THE

RULES REGULATING THE MANNER OF CONDUCTING THE SAME.

PHILADELPHIA:

C. SHERMAN AND CO., PRINTERS, 19 ST. JAMES STREET.

1837.

THE LOGANIAN LIBRARY.

This collection of rare and valuable books, principally in the learned and existing languages of the continent of Europe, owes its origin to the Honourable James Logan, the confidential friend and counsellor of William Penn, and, for some time, president of the council of the province of Pennsylvania. Its foundation consists of a portion of his own private library; which, having collected at considerable expense, he was anxious should descend to posterity, and continue usefully to extend to others the means of prosecuting those pursuits he had himself so successfully cultivated. With this view, he erected a suitable building in Sixth street near Walnut, for the reception of a library, and, by deed, vested it (with the books and certain rents, for the purpose of increasing their number, and paying a librarian,) in trustees, for the use of the public, for ever.

This deed he afterwards cancelled, and prepared, but did not live to execute, another, in which some alteration was made in the funds and regulations. After his death, his children* and residuary legatees, with commendable liberality, carried into effect the intentions of Mr. Logan, and conveyed the building, books, and rents charge to trustees, who caused the library, consisting of more than two thousand volumes, to be arranged, and a catalogue to be printed.

It should therefore be distinctly noted, that it is to the children of James Logan, that the public is indebted for having thus appropriated the books and rents, agreeably to the original design. They were William and James Logan, John Smith and Hannah his wife, she being the surviving daughter.

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