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Rights of M. - French Revolution.

Man : being an Answer to Mr. Burke's Attack on the

By Thomas Paine,

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tion, and Quesnay and Turgot by their moral maxims and systems of oeconomy, readers of every class met with something to their taste, and a spirit of political enquiry began to diffuse itself through the nation at the time the dispute between England and the then colonies of America broke out. In the war which France afterwards engaged in, it is very well known that the nation appeared to be before-hand with the French ministry. Each of them had its view : but those views were directed to different obječts; the one fought liberty, and the other re. taliation on England. The French officers and soldiers who after this went to Ameriga, were eventually placed in the school of Freedom, and learned the practice as well as the Principles of it by heart, As it was impossible to separate the military events which took place in America from the principles of the American revolution, the publication of those events in France necessarily connected themselves with the principles which produced them. Many of the facts were in themselves principles; such as the declaration of American independence, and the treaty of alliance between France and America, which recognised the natural right of man, and justified resistance to oppresfion. The then Minister of France, Count Vergennes, was not the friend of America; and it is both justice and gratitude to say, that it was the Queen of France who gave the cause of America a fashion at the French Court. Count Vergennes was the personal and social friend of Dr. Franklia; and the Počior had obtained

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