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AVERAGE PRICES of CORN, from July 1, 1791, to July 30. 1791.

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r’OLITICAL

MAGAZINE,

For 7 U L 2, 1791.

Particulars of the King of France's Flight.

N the fitting of the National Assembly of Wednesday last, M. Mouquet, from several committees, made the following report. “For a considerable time the Sieur Bouillé had been soliciting the King to quit Paris, where he fancied that imaginary dangers surrounded him, with terror and disquiet, and he promised him in the departments where he commanded a public force, a peace and liberty of which he affected to believe he was deprived in the capital. The King resisted long : at length he yielded–and from that moment preparations were made for his departure. “On the 11th of June, the King, accompanied by the Queen alone, went at five o’clock to the house of Madame Rochereuil, one of the ladies in her service, whose apartment communicated to a corrodor by a itaircase, and by a staircase also to the apartment of M. de Villequier. The Queen, after examining this apartment, and its communication with others, told Madame de Rochereuil, that she meant to employ her as one of the ladies of her bedchamber. “The King then desired to be conducted to the apartment of M. de Villequier, the door of which opened to the Prince’s Court. He called for the key of this door. Madame de Rochèreuil answered, that fince the departure of M. Villequier the door

was always open, and the door at the bottom of the staircase, leading to the anti-chamber, only was shut. “On the 13th the King ordered the Sieur Renard, Inspector of the Buildings, to cause the key of the door of M. de Villequier’s anti-chamber, and the key of the door of the little staircase leading from the apartments of Madame de Rochereuil, to be brought to him ; which was done. “On the 17th the Sieur Dumoutier, formerly of the Body Guard, walking in the #." of the Thuilleries, was accosted by a person unknown, who defired him to follow him to receive the King's orders. He followed this person, who introduced him to the King’s chamber. The King ordered him to tell the Sieurs Maldan and Vallory, two of his former companions, to provide themselves with courier's dresses of a yellow colour. The King then directed him to walk on the Key of the Pont-Royal, and that there a person would make himself known to him and communicate his further orders. The Sieur Dumoutier, after speaking to his two companions of the King's orders, did with them as he was directed, by a person also unknown. “ On the 20th the Sicur Vallory went on horseback to Bondy, to bespeak post-horses for the King. The Sieur Dumoutier went the Éme day to the gate of St. Martin, where B. z. there

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there was a berlin with four horses. The Sieur de Maldan repaired to the Court of the Palace, at eleven at night, on the 20th, and was condućted into a closet, where he was shut up till midnight. A 'carriage with two hors s drew up at eleven o'clock, in the Prince’s Court. A chaise from the hotel of Count Fersen, Colonel of the Royal Swedish Regiment, one of the principal agents in this enterprize, waited on the quay of Voltaire, at the extremity of the Pont-Royal. No change was made in the economy of the Royal Household, the usual orders were given, and all retired to bed at the usual hour. “At half an hour past eleven, the Queen went into her daughter's chamber, and ordered the Lady of her Bedchamber to dress Madame Royale and condućt her to the Dauphin's apartment. Madame de Tourzel, who had received orders fiom the King in the course of the day, at the same time told Madame de Neuville, Lady of the Bedchamber to the Dauphin, to dress him, and Madame Royale being come wentwith her, the Dauphin, Madame Brugnier, and Madome de Neuville to an apartment where they found the King, the Queen, Madame Elizabeth, and two persons unknown. Gne of these persons was directed to condućt Madame Brugnier, and Madame de Neuville to the carriage at Pont-Royal, whence thoy repaired to Clayes, according to their orders. The other conducted Madame de Tourzel, with the Dauphin, and Madame Royale, by the little staircase to the Prince’s Court, where a carriage was waiting for them. The carriage stopped at the end of the Carousel, to wait for the rest of the Royal Family. Madame Elizabeth and the queen arrived alone, and on foot, and were put into the carriage by the driver. The King followed, attended by the Sieur Maldan, who got up behind the carriage, which then took the road to Londy.

“At the gate of St. Martin the

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