The Substance of a Course of Lectures on British Colonial Slavery: Delivered at Bradford, York and Scarborough

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J. Hatcharrd, 1830 - Antislavery movements - 171 pages
 

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Page 65 - The whole commerce between master and slave is a perpetual exercise of the most boisterous passions, the most unremitting despotism on the one part, and degrading submissions on the other.
Page 23 - That through a determined and persevering, but, at the same time, judicious and temperate enforcement of such measures, this House looks forward to a progressive improvement in the character of the slave population, such as may prepare them for a participation in those civil rights and privileges which are enjoyed by other classes of his majesty's subjects.
Page 95 - Now I say, That the heir, as long as he is a child, differeth nothing from a servant, though he be lord of all ; but is under tutors and governors, until the time appointed of the father.
Page 117 - He that stealeth a man and selleth him, or if he be found in his hands, he shall surely be put to death...
Page 121 - ... precept. These are the eternal, immutable laws of good and evil, to which the Creator himself, in all his dispensations, conforms ; and which he has enabled human reason to discover, so far as they are necessary for the conduct of human actions. Such among others are these principles : that we should live honestly, should hurt nobody, and should render to every one his due ; to which three general precepts Justinian has reduced the whole doctrine of law.
Page 89 - The absolute rights of man, considered as a free agent, endowed with discernment to know good from evil, and with power of choosing those measures which appear to him to be most desirable, are usually summed up in one general appellation, and denominated the natural liberty of mankind.
Page 89 - This natural liberty consists properly in a power of acting as one thinks fit, without any restraint or control, unless by the law of nature ; being a right inherent in us by birth, and one of the gifts of God to man at his creation, when he endued him with the faculty of free-will.
Page 24 - That this House is anxious for the accomplishment of this purpose, at the earliest period that shall be compatible with the wellbeing of the slaves themselves, with the safety of the colonies, and with a fair and equitable consideration of the interests of private property.
Page 91 - That the laws made by them for the purposes aforesaid shall not be repugnant, but, as near as may be, agreeable to the laws of England, and shall be transmitted to the King in Council for approbation, as soon as may be after their passing; and if not disapproved within three years after presentation, to remain in force.
Page 107 - History, expressed her concern lest any of the Africans should be carried off without their free consent, declaring, " that it would be detestable and call down the vengeance of Heaven upon the undertakers.

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