Views of ports and harbours [etc.] engr. by W. and E. Finden [ed. by W.A. Chatto].

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1838 - 40 pages
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Page 150 - Her home is on the deep. With thunders from her native oak She quells the floods below, — As they roar on the shore, When the stormy tempests blow — When the battle rages loud and long, And the stormy winds do blow.
Page 150 - O ! let not virtue seek Remuneration for the thing it was ; For beauty, wit, High birth, vigour of bone, desert in service, Love, friendship, charity, are subjects all To envious and calumniating time. One touch of nature makes the whole world kin...
Page 150 - O'errun and trampled on: then what they do in present Though less than yours in past, must o'ertop yours; For time is like a fashionable host, That slightly shakes his parting guest by the hand, And with his arms outstretch'd, as he would fly, Grasps in the comer: welcome ever smiles, And farewell goes out sighing.
Page 153 - tis, to cast one's eyes so low! The crows and choughs, that wing the midway air, Show scarce so gross as beetles : Half way down Hangs one that gathers samphire; dreadful trade! Methinks, he seems no bigger than his head: The fishermen, that walk upon the beach, Appear like mice; and yon...
Page 40 - Rather had I a Jew be hated thus, Than pitied in a Christian poverty...
Page 153 - tis to cast one's eyes so low ! The crows, and choughs, that wing the midway air, Show scarce so gross as beetles. Half way down Hangs one that gathers samphire ; dreadful trade ! Methinks he seems no bigger than his head. The fishermen, that walk upon the beach, Appear like mice ; and yon' tall, anchoring bark, Diminished to her cock ; her cock, a buoy Almost too small for sight.
Page 45 - Oft as sea-breezes blow. The sun and clouds alone possess The joy of all that loveliness ; And sweetly to each other smile The live-long day — sun, cloud, and isle. How silent lies each sheltered bay ! No other visitors have they To their shores of silvery sand, Than the waves that, murmuring in their glee, All hurrying in a joyful band Come dancing from the sea.
Page 153 - Come on, sir; here's the place ; — stand still, — How fearful And dizzy 'tis, to cast one's eyes so low ! The crows, and choughs, that wing the midway air.
Page 100 - He is unworthy of the name of a gentleman, or soldier, in my opinion, that is afraid to sacrifice his life for the honour of God, his King, and Country. JOHN FELTON...
Page 30 - Marley, to the Scottish army, under the Earl of Leven ; and in 1782, it was advertised to be let, by the lessee under the crown, John Crichloe Turner, Esq., as a place most suitable for a wind-mill. As it contained a good spring of water, the hydraulic capabilities of the property were not overlooked by the advertiser. " There is a good spring of water within the castle," saith he, " which renders it a very eligible situation for a brewery, or any manufactory that requires a constant supply of water.

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