The Opinions of Sir Robert Peel: Expressed in Parliament and in Public

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Whittaker & Company, 1843 - Great Britain - 480 pages
 

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Page 223 - I can neither forget nor express the strong emotions which agitated my mind as I first approached, and entered the eternal city. After a sleepless night, I trod, with a lofty step, the ruins of the Forum ; each memorable spot where Romulus stood, or Tully spoke, or Caesar fell, was at once present to my eye ; and several days of intoxication were lost or enjoyed before I could descend to a cool and minute investigation.
Page 152 - Come the eleventh plague, rather than this should be; Come sink us rather in the sea. Come rather pestilence, and reap us down ; Come God's sword rather than our own. Let rather Roman come again, Or Saxon, Norman, or the Dane : In all the bonds we ever bore, We griev'd, we sigh'd, we wept ; we never blush'd before.
Page 222 - He that wrestles with us strengthens our nerves and sharpens our skill. Our antagonist is our helper. This amicable conflict with difficulty obliges us to an intimate acquaintance with our object, and compels us to consider it in all its relations. It will not suffer us to be superficial.
Page 129 - I saw her just above the horizon, decorating and cheering the elevated sphere she just began to move in— glittering like the morning star, full of life, and splendour, and joy.
Page 226 - I took as much delight in reading as you do ; it would be the means of alleviating many tedious hours in my present retirement. But, to my misfortune, I derive no pleasure from such pursuits.
Page 219 - I do not know what I may appear to the world, but to myself I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the sea-shore, and diverting myself in now and then finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than ordinary, whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.
Page 222 - DIFFICULTY is a severe instructor, set over us by the Supreme ordinance of a parental guardian and legislator, who knows us better than we know ourselves, as he loves us better, too. Pater ipse colendi, haud facilem esse viam voluit. He that wrestles with us, strengthens our nerves and sharpens our skill ; our antagonist is our helper.
Page 12 - I have said enough with respect to general principles and their practical application to public measures, to indicate the spirit in which the King's Government is prepared to act. Our object will be the maintenance of peace, the scrupulous and honourable fulfilment, without reference to their original policy, of all existing engagements with Foreign Powers, the support of public credit, the enforcement of strict economy, and the just and impartial consideration of what is due to all interests, agricultural,...
Page 73 - I am well aware that the fate of this measure cannot now be altered ; — if it succeed, the credit will belong to others ; if it fail, the responsibility will devolve upon me, and upon those with whom I have acted.
Page 195 - The enemies of this expedient argued, that should the silver coin be called in, it would be impossible to maintain the war abroad, or prosecute foreign trade, inasmuch as the merchant could not pay his bills of exchange, nor the soldier receive his subsistence : that a stop would be put to all mutual payment ; and this would produce universal confusion and despair. Such a reformation could not be...

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