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these several sorts of gentlemen what it is they wish for, you will find they have several ends in view : some of them are men that have, by their extravagance, spent their fortunes, lost their credit, and therefore are in a violent haste for a 'war, in hopes, by plurder,"to replenish their pockets, Jike vultures who keep hovering over a dead carcase. They speak aloud just as they would have it, that all things are Tanning to confusion. Oihers, like crows, love the fruits of the earth, but hate the smell of gunpowder; and these affirm as positively, though not so loudly, that we shall be inevitably ruined unless there is a change of the ministry. A third sort of this disaffected party, are a set of men like moles, that are always digging under ground, and no kind of soil can escape their talons.

Besides these there is another party, whose designs are extremely foreign to any of the rest, and yet they are equally pernicious. There are several select companies of drunkards, who, instead of minding their own business, assemble at different alehouses to settle the state of the nation, over a tankard of porter, or a bowl of punch. These may properly be called,

A panipered people, and debauch'd with ease,

“ No king can govern, and no God can please." The above gentry are a real nuisance to human society, as they raise groundless fears in the minds of peaceable people, who think it high time to feel their grievances when they really happen.

No man can be more a friend, and even an advocate for the liberties of his country, than myself; and a patriotic king will, at all tiines, aitend to the voice of his people, and, as a common father, love to be put in mind of his duty. But when I find no fault committed by administra. tion, except such as is inseparably connected with human nature, I consider the abettors as real incendiaries, who want to create dissensions amongst a brave united people, and make their beloved sovereigo conceive an antipathy against his loyal subjects.

For myown part, when I consider the present distracted state of affairs, and compare it with my duty as an individual, I am ready to cry out with the Psalmist, “ May peace be within her walls, and prosperity within her palaces!” May they prosper who wish her well, and seek her peace continually! and in this wish I doubt not but you will join heartily with

Your friend.

CARDS OF COMPLIMENT.

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YARDS of compliment should be short, easy, and con.

sistent with politeness. They must begin with the title or style of the writer-and care must be taken immediately after to mention, in a respectful manner, the style or title of those to whom they are addressed ; they must contain but one subject, and that should be expressed with elegance and perspicuity.

MISS SPRIGHTLY's respectful compliments to Lady Tissue, entreals the honour of her company this afternoon to a disk of tea.

Monday Morn.

LADY TISSUE's compliments to Miss Sprightly, is happy to accept her agreeable invitation.

Monday Noon.

MRS. FLEMING's compliments to Miss Dyson, hopes she got safe home, and is in health, after the fatigue of sitting up so late.

Friday Morn,

MISS DYSON's compliments to Mrs. Fleming, got home perfectly safe, and is extremely well; returns respect ful thanks for her obliging inquiries.

Friday 2 o'Clock.

LORD SPANGLE's compliments to Sir James Brilliant, should esteem it as a favour to be obliged with his company to take an airing 10 Kew--the chariot to be at the door at three.

Thursday Noon.

SIR JAMES BRILLIANT's respectful compliments to Lord Spangle-will be happy to attend his lordship punctually at the time.

Thursday 2 o'clock.

MISS GUITAR's compliments, should be glad of Miss Spinnet's company to pick a bit of dinner with her.

Wednesday so'elock,

MISS SPINNET's compliments, will not fail to wait upon Miss Guitar.

Wednesday 10 o'clock.

MRS. SHADWELL's compliments to Miss Cloudy, should be glad of her agreeable company to pass the afternoon.

10 v'clock Morn.

MISS CLOUDY’s compliments to Mrs. Shadwell, cannot have the pleasure of accepting her agreeable invitation, being engaged in a party to Cox's Museum.

il o'clock Morn.

LORD HAIRBRAIN's compliments to Mr. Sparrow, should be glad of his company in the evening to Vauxhall.

Thursday 4 o'clock.

MR. SPARROW's respectful compliments to Lord Hairbrain, must deny himself the pleasure of attending his Lordship, being already engaged in a party to Ranelagh.

Thursday 5 o'clock.

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Having presented our readers with letters on the most

important concerns of life, and forms for writing complimentary cards, in order to make the work as complete as possible, we have here added several useful forms in law, such as a mortgage, a letter of licence, bonds, indentures, &c. together with a great variety of petitions, from people in lower, or middling states of life, to those in higher stations. A COMMON MORTGAGE ON AN ESTATE. HIS Indenture made between A. B. of &c. of the one

part, and C. D. of &c. of the other part, witnesseth, that the said A. B. for and in consideration of the sum of one hundred pounds of lawful money of Great-Britain, to him in hand paid by the said C. D. the receipt whereof the said A. B. doth hereby confess and acknowledge; he the said A. B. hath granted, bargained, and sold, and by these presents doth grant, &c. unto the said C. D. all that messuage or fenement, &c. and all those lands, &c, situate, &c. and also the reversion and reversions, remainder and semainders, rents and services of and singular the said premises abovementioned, and of every part and parcel thereof, with the appurtenances, to have and to hold the said messuage or tenement, lands and premises above-mentioned, and of every part and parcel thereof, with the appurtenances, unto the said C. D. his executors, administrators, and assigns, for and during the term of five hundred years, next and immediately ensuing and following, and fully to be complete and ended : yielding and paying therefore yearly, during the said term, one pepper-corn, in and upon the feast of Si. Michael, the Archangel, if demanded. Provided always, and

condition, ihat if the said A. B. his heirs or assigns, do, and shall well and truly pay, or cause to be paid, unto the said C. D. his executors, administrators, and assigns, the full sum of one hundred and five pounds of lawful British money, in and upon the day, &c. without any deduction or abatement for taxes, assessments, or any other impositions whatsoever, either ordinary or extraordinary; that then and from henceforth these presents, and everything herein contained, shall cease, determine, and be void; any thing berein contained to the contrary notwithstanding and the said A. B. for himself, his heirs, and assigns, doth covenant and grant to, and with the said C. D. his executors, administrators, and assigns, and that the said. A. B. his heirs or assigns, shall and will well and truly pay, or cause to be paid, unto the said, C. D. his exe. cutors, administrators, or assigns, the said tuli sum of one hundred and five pounds, in and upon the said day, &c. which will be in the said year, &c. without any deduction as aforesaid, according to the true intent and meaning of these presents. And also, that he the said C. D. his executors, administrators, and assigos, shall and may at all times, after default shall be made in performance of the proviso or condition herein contained, peaceably and quietly enter into, have, hold, occupy, possess, and enjoy all and singuIar the said messuage or ienement, lands, and premises above-mentioned, and every part and parcel thereof, with the appurtenances, for and during the residue and remainder of the said term of five hundred years hereby granted, which shall be then to come and unexpired, with. out the let, trouble, hinderance, molestation, interruption, and denial of him the said A. B. his heirs and assigns, and of all and every other person or persons, and his and their heirs, and things having or claiming in the said messuage or tenement, and premises above-mentioned, or any part thereof, shall and will, at any time or times, after default shall be made in performance of the proviso or condition herein contained, make, do, or execute, or cause or procure to be made, done, or executed, all and every such further and other lawful and reasonable grants, acts, and assurances in the law whatsoever, for the further, better, and more persect granting and assuring of all and singular the said premises above-mentioned, with the appurtenances, unto the said C. D. to hold to him the said C. D. his executors, administrators, and assigns, for and during all the rest and residue of the said term of five hundred years above granted which shall be then to come and unexpired, as by the sail C. D. his executors, administrators, or assigns, or his or their counsel learned in the law shall be reasonably.devised, or advised and required. And lastly, it is covenanıtd, granted, concluded, and agreed upon, by. and between the said parties to these presents; and the true meaning here. of also is; and it is hereby so declareit, that. unildietault shall be made in performance of the proviso or condition, herein contained, he the said A. B. his heirs and assigos, shall and may hold and enjoy all and singular the said pre

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