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To the same, for a tide-waiter's place in the custom-house. To the Right Honourable the First Lord Commissioner of

the Treasury.

The humble petition of A. B.
Showeth,

HAT your petitioner had the misfortune to be brought

up in a trade, which hands are employed in it, and even those can scarce procure a subsistence. That your petitioner has sought for every opportunity to obtain employment in vain, and at present is left in a very distressed condition. That your petitioner being desirous to apply bimself to some useful employment, and finding that some tide-waiters are al present wanting on the river, has, with the greatest humility, presumed to beg of your lordship to be employed as one. He is ready to produce proofs of his ability to discharge the duty of that station, and if so happy as to seem worthy of your lordship’s notice, he shall, on all occasions, observethe strictest fidelity, and make it appear to the world that he has not been unworthy of your favour.

And, as in duty bound, shall ever pray.

To the same, for a place in the excise. To the Right Honourable the First Lord Commissioner of

the Treasury.

The humble petition of A: B. Showeth, "HAT your petitioner had the misfortune not to be

brought up to any other employment than that of a gentleman's servant, in which station he continued till last year, when he married, and was discharged from his place. That your petitioner being out of all manner of employment, and having learned the whole art and mystery of gauging, he has presumed to address himself to your lorda ship, for one of the present vacant places of a common exciseman, in any part of the kingdom where your lordship shall think proper to order. His conduct has always been

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blameless, and bis character will bear the strictest inquiry, and on all occasions he will make it his principal'study 10 discharge every part of his duty with the utmost fidelity.

And, as in duty bound, shall ever pray.

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From a decayed tradesman, to the president and governors

of Christ's hospital, for the admission of a boy on that foundation,

The humble petition of A. B. Showeth, HAT your petitioner has lived many years in credit,

but through long sickness, and many losses in trade, is unable to bestow upon his youngest son an education suitable to qualify him for an honest employment by which he might become useful in society. That your petitioner is a freeman of the city of London, and while in prosperity served all the offices in his parish. That his other children are so far grown up, as to be already bound apprentices to different trades, without ever having any assistance either from public or private charities. That your petitioner would not have made this request, had not he been impelled by the greatest necessity. That your petitioner has nothing more to subsist on, but what he earns by his daily labour, andwhich is scarcelysufficient to procure him the necessaries of life. In consideration of which he humbly begs your honours will be pleased to take the premises into consider. ation, and admit a friendless boy on your foundation.

And your petitioner, as in duty bound, shall ever pray.

From a young man, late usher to an academy, to be ad.

mitted a clerk in the bank.

To the Governors and Directors of the Bank of England.

The humble petition of A. B.
Showeth,
THAT your petitioner was formerly usher and accompt.

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married, was discharged from his office, as none but single | men are permitted to reside in those seminaries. That your petitioner being willing to do every thing in his power for support as an honest man, and being properly qualified to discharge all the cuties incumbent on a clerk of the bank, he has presumed to take this method of applying to the ho. nourable directors. His character will bear the strictest inquiry, and several gentlemen will give sufficient security for any trust reposed in him. He has the greater reason to hope for success, as he is not capable of following any other employment saving only that of the pen; and if so happy as to obtain his request, it shall be his constant study to discharge with fidelity every duty of that station.

And your petitioner, as in duty bound, shall ever pray. From a disabled porter, to the postmaster-general, to be

admitted as a letter-carrier.
To the Right Honourable the Postmaster-General.

The humble petition of A. B.
Showeth,
THAT your petitioner was brought up to the business of

a porter, and by extreme hard labour procured a subsistence for himself, together with a wife and four children. That your petitioner had the misfortune one day to fall down under a load, by which two of his ribs were broken, and orherwise so much hurt, as to be unable to carry loads for the future: That your petitioner was six months in St. Thomas's hospital, during which time his wife and family were in a starving condition, being obliged to pawn their clothes for the common necessaries of life. That when your petitioner was discharged from the hospital, he considered it as his duty to look for some employment suitable to the weak state in which his misfortunc had left him. That having heard that one of your messengers was dead, and being well acquainted with every part of the town, he thought himself properly qualified to act as a letter-carrier, and ior that purpose has presumed to present this petition to your lordship. That your petitioner's characier wil bear the strictest inquiry, and if so happy as to succeed, will give security (if demanded) and in all things act with the greatest fidelity.

And your petitioner, as in duty bound, shall eyer pray.

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From a young man, to be admitted as a puršer in the East

India service. To the Chairman and Directors of the Honourable United

East-India Company.

The humble petition of A. B. Showeth, CHAT your petitioner served an apprenticeship to a silk

mercer, and was discharged with a proper certificate of his upright behaviour. That not having money to set up as a master, and being but little acquainted with ihe world, he was obliged to look out for some other employment; and having an earnest desire to visit foreign countries, he has presumed to address himself to the Directors of the EastIndia Company, in hopes of obtaining the place of one of their pursers. Certificates will be given of his ability for that office, security deposited for whatever trust is lodged with him, and his duty discharged with the strictest fidelity. That your petitioner is at present out of all manner of employment, and would willingly spend his youth in being useful to himself and constituents ; nor does he desire any further encouragement than his merit shall apparently entitle him to, and if so happy as to succeed, shall

, As in duty bound, ever pray.

To the same, from a young gentleman, to be surgeon's male. To the Chairman and Directors of the Honourable United

East India Company.

The humble petition of A. B.
Showeth,

HAT your petitioner served an apprenticeship to an

eminent surgeon in the country, and afterwards attended the practice of the different hospitals in London; that having been examined at the Company's hall, he was discharged with a certificate of his abilities to exercise the profession of a surgeon, either at home or abroad. That your petitioner being young, would willingly spend some

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part of his time in visiting different nations, particularly the East Indies, in order to make himself acquainted with the disorders pecaliar those climates; that not having it in his power to go at his own expense, he has presumed to solicit the honourable Directors to be admitted as surgeon, or surgeon's male, on board of one of their outward-bound ships; and as he presumes that his abilities will be found sufficient for the discharge of his duty, so likewise it shall be his principal study to trat every one of the patients commiited to his care with the greatest humanity. That your petitioner "shall, in all things, conform to the rules prescribed for his conduct, and if so happy as to succeed,

As in duty bound, shull ever pray.

To the same, from a labourer, desiring to be admitted a

porter. To the Chairman and Directors of the Honourable United

East India Company.

The humble petition of A. B. Showeth,

HAT your petitioner has served sixteen years as a

Jabourer in the tea-warehouse belonging to the honourable Company, and that during the above time he has constantly attended his duty, and his conduct has been always approved of by his superiors. That your petitioner is now the oldest labourer in the house, nor has he had any thing to subsist on during the whole time of his servitude, besides his stated wages. That he has brought up a large family of children, anel has at present a sickly wife, far advanced in years. Thal the elder porter of that department to which I belong being lately deceased, and there being several candidates to succeed hiin, I have laid hold of the same opportunity with them; and although I have not any fault to find in the conduct of my opponents, yet it is pos. sible the following circumstances may plead in my 'favour, viz. My long servitude,--my advanced years,-aad my i wife's infirmities; and if in compassion to my distress you will be pleased to grant my request, it shall be the business of my future life, to act with the same conscientious fide. lity in a more elevated station, as I always have done in that of a more inferior.

And your petitioner, as in duty bound, shall ever prav.

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