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From a decayed tradesman, to have his son admitted into

Merchant Tailors' school.

To the Masters and Wardens of the Worshipful Company

of Merchant Tailors.

The humble petition of A. B. Showeth,

HAT your petitioner has long carried on trade in numerous family, he is obliged to solicit ihe favour of the Company to have his youngest son admitted as a scholar on your foundation; and if so happy as to succeed in this his first request, he shall,

As in duty bound, ever pray.

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For a watchman's place at the bank. To the Honourable the Chairman, and Directors of the

Bank of England.

The humble petition of A. B. Showeth, TH THAT your petitioner was brought up to the trade of a

watch.gilder, but at present there is little or no employment for hands in that branch of business. That your petitioner has a wife and children, and at present nothing to support them with; that a certificate of his honesty and industry is ready to be produced, signed by three reputable housekeepers; and if you will, in consideration of his distress, appoint him one of your watchmen, he will discharge his duty with the utmost fidelity.

And, as in duty bound, shall ever pray.

From a widow to the lord almoner, for a share of the

king's bounty,
To the Right Rev. the Lord High Almoner.

The humble petition of A. B.

Showeth, THAT your lordship’s petitioner is the widow of an afflictions, reduced to the lowest state of poverty; that your petitioner has no relief froin any parish, but has been sometimes charitably assisted by the benovolence of some tender-hearted Christians. That at present she is in very great distress, and therefore humbly prays your lordship for what share of his inajesty's royal bounty you shall

think proper.

And, as in duty bound, shall ever pray.

From a poor widow to the dean of Westminster, for the

weekly allowance of bread and meat at the Abbey.

To the Reverend the Dean of Westminster.

The humble petition of A. B. Showeth,

HAT your petitioner has lived soberly and honestly that at present she is greatly distressed in her circum-stances, although she labours very hard for her living : that there being now a vacancy in the number of poor widows who receive the weekly bounty, she humbly begs to be admitted as one.

And, as in duty bound, shall ever pray.

From a poor citizen, to be admitted into Bancroft's alms

houses.

To the Worshipful the Trustees of Bancroft's Alms Houses.

The humble petition of A. B.

Showeth,
THAT your petitioner is a native of London, where he

served his apprenticeship, and afterwards carried on business for himself; but by a variety of losses is now reduced, in his old age, to solicit the relief of some public charity: that hearing there is at present a vacancy in your alms houses, he humbly begs to be admitted as one of your pensioners, being well convinced your worships will find him a proper object of charity.

And your petitioner, as in duty bound, shall ever pray.

From a vintner's widow, to be admitted into the Company's

alms houses.

The humble petition of A. B.

Showeth, THAT your petitioner's late husband lived in great cre

dit in Cheapside, and was free of yoor Company many years; that he died in very low circumstances, and left your petitioner, in her old age, wholly unprovided for; that your petitioner is at present utterly destitute of all the necessaries of life, and therefore humbly begs to be admitted into your alms houses.

And your petitioner, as in duty bound, shall ever pray. From a poor widow to the lord chancellor, To the Right Honourable the Lord High Chancellor of

Great Britain,

The humble petition of A. B. Showeth, WHAT your lordship's petitioner has been long involved

in a chancery suit, and has spent all her substance without being able to obtain a decree. That your petitioner not having money to proceed further, humbly begs your lordship to suffer her to sue in forma pauperis.

And your petitioner, as in duty bound, shall ever pray.

From the wife of a sailor who had been impressed.

To the Right Honourable the Lords of the Admiralty.

The humble petition of A. B. Showeth, HAT your petitioner's husband has been absent from

England these three years in the East-Indies, and was, upon his return, impressed into his majesty's service, before he had an opportunity of settling his affairs, or even seeing his family. That your petitioner is in very distressed cir cumstances, oecasioned by her husband's absence, nor can she receive his wages unless he is present. May it therefore please your lordships, in consideration of your petitioner's great distress, to grant an order for her husband's. discharge, or at least a few weeks liberty, for bim to setue his affairs.

And your petitioner, as in duty bound, shall ever pray.

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the King's Most Excellent Majesty, Sire, or May it please your To his Royal Highness George, Prince of Wales, Sir, or, May. it please your Royal Highness. · In the same manner to the rest of the Royal Family.

TO THE NOBILITY.

To his Grace the Duke of S. My Lord Duke, or May it please your Grace, or Your Grace.

To the Most Noble the Marquis of H. My Lord Marquis, your Lordship.

To the Right Honourable the Earl of B. My Lord, your Lordship

To the Right Honourable the Lord Viscount D. My Lord, your Lordship.

To the Right Honourable the Lord F. My Lord, your Lordship.

The Ladies are addressed according to the rank of their Husbands.

The Sons of Dukes, Marquisses, and the eldest Sons of Earls have, by the Courtesy of England, the title of Lord and Right Honourable; and the title of Lady is given to their Daughters.

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