Appendix to the Journals of the Senate and Assembly ... of the Legislature of the State of California ..., Volume 3

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Sup't State Printing, 1875

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Page 217 - That every parent, guardian, or other person in the State of Michigan, having control and charge of any child or children between the ages of eight and fourteen years, shall be required to send such child or children to a public school for a period of at least four months in each school year...
Page 241 - Oh ! young Lochinvar is come out of the west, Through all the wide Border his steed was the best ; And save his good broadsword he weapons had none, He rode all unarmed and he rode all alone. So faithful in love and so dauntless in war, There never was knight like the young Lochinvar.
Page 55 - I think, to justify the assertion that none are too old, too poor, too ignorant, too feeble, too sickly, too unqualified in any or every way, to regard themselves, and to be regarded by others, as unfit for school-keeping.
Page 230 - The sooty films that play upon the bars Pendulous, and foreboding in the view Of superstition prophesying still Though still deceived, some stranger's near approach.
Page 22 - What with perceptions unnaturally dulled by early thwarting, and a coerced attention to books — what with the mental confusion produced by teaching subjects before they can be understood, and in each of them giving generalizations before the facts of which...
Page 99 - SECTION 1. Teachers are required to be present at their respective school-rooms, and to open them for the admission of pupils, at fifteen minutes before the time prescribed for commencing school, and to observe punctually the hours for opening and closing school. 'SEC. 2. Unless otherwise provided by special action of Trustees or Boards of Education, the daily school session shall commence at nine o'clock AM, and close at four o'clock PM, with an intermission at noon of one hour, from twelve M.
Page 79 - ... superinduced by the antecedent exhaustion of the party, arising from gross and habitual drunkenness. However criminal, in a moral point of view, such an indulgence is, and however justly a party may be responsible for his acts arising from it to Almighty God, human tribunals are generally restricted from punishing them, since they are not the acts of a reasonable being. Had the crime been committed while Drew was in a fit of intoxication, he would have been liable to be convicted of murder.
Page 99 - No pupil shall be detained in school during the intermission at noon, and a pupil detained at any recess shall be permitted to go out immediately thereafter. All pupils, except those detained for punishment, shall be required to pass out of the schoolrooms at recess, unless it would occasion an exposure of health.
Page 49 - State, and shall take cognizance of the interests of health and life among the citizens generally. They shall make sanitary investigations, and inquiries respecting the causes of disease, especially of epidemics, the sources of mortality, and the effects of localities, employments, conditions, and circumstances on the Public Health...
Page 24 - This need for perpetual telling results from our stupidity, not from the child's. We drag it away from the facts in which it is interested, and which it is actively assimilating of itself. We put before it facts far too complex for it to understand ; and therefore distasteful to it. Finding that it will not voluntarily acquire these facts, we thrust them into its mind by force of threats and punishment. By thus denying the knowledge it craves, and cramming it with knowledge it cannot digest, we produce...

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