The Life of the Rt. Hon. John Edward Ellis, M. P.; with a Pref. by Viscount Bryce

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Macmillan, 1914 - Ellis, John Edward - 299 pages
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Page 177 - We want a stream of facts concerning suppression of telegrams, opening of letters, arbitrary arrests, unfair trial, unjustifiable prison treatment, interference with free speech at meetings, but much information sent lacks the element of fulness, detail, and accuracy which are vital for parliamentary purposes. The names of informants will be treated as confidential.
Page 156 - Neither the Secretary of State for the Colonies nor any of the officials of the Colonial Office received any information which made them, or should have made them or any of them, aware of the plot during its development.
Page 136 - The fact that Mr Rhodes (after having authorised that they should be shown to Mr Chamberlain) has refused to allow them to be produced before the Committee, leads to the conclusion that he is aware that any statements purporting to implicate the Colonial Office contained in them were unfounded, and the use made of them in support of his action in South Africa was not justified.
Page 286 - The world can never give The bliss for which we sigh ; 'Tis not the whole of life to live, Nor all of death to die.
Page 159 - But as to one thing I am perfectly convinced — that while the fault of Mr. Rhodes is about as great a fault as a politician or a statesman can commit, there has Iwen nothing proved — and in my opinion there exists nothing — which affects Mr. Rhodes's personal position as a man of honour.
Page 156 - (1) That compulsory labour did undoubtedly exist in Matabeleland if not in Mashonaland ; (2) that labour was procured by the various native commissioners for the various requirements of the Government, mining companies, and private persons ; (3) that the native commissioners in the first place endeavoured to obtain labour through the indunas, but failing in this they procured it by force.
Page 182 - I first received the right 1 hon. Gentleman's letter to deny his right ; to ask me to explain, but I did not wish to expose myself to what no doubt would have been a certain risk of misconception, . so I wrote these lines. That is the story so far. Now I should like to thank the Leader of the Opposition for the protest he raised to-night, not for the first time, against the publication of private • correspondence, and I protest in the most emphatic manner against a •Government Department publishing...
Page 136 - desire to put on record an absolute and unqualified condemnation of the raid and of the plans which made it possible. The result caused for the time being grave injury to British influence in South Africa. Public confidence was shaken, race feeling embittered, and serious difficulties were created with neighboring States.
Page 181 - ... though he might be boisterous and contradictory at times. Anyhow, he wounded that Frenchman's feelings to that extent that he wrote to the Bishop ; and the Bishop wrote, in a rather peremptory manner, to my father. I will give the correspondence : Enclosure No.

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