The Universal Guide of Standard Routes and Itineraries of Tourist Travel All Over the World

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D. Thorpe, 1907 - Africa - 294 pages

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Page 88 - Invisible; and from the land we went, As to a floating City — steering in, And gliding up her streets as in a dream, So smoothly, silently — by many a dome, Mosque-like, and many a stately portico, The statues ranged along an azure sky; By many a pile in more than Eastern pride, Of old the residence of merchant-kings ; The fronts of some, though Time had shattered them. Still glowing with the richest hues of art, As though the wealth within them had run o'er.
Page 172 - WHO has not heard of the Vale of Cashmere, With its roses the brightest that earth ever gave, Its temples, and grottos, and fountains as clear As the love-lighted eyes that hang over their wave...
Page 16 - THE harp that once through Tara's halls The soul of music shed, Now hangs as mute on Tara's walls As if that soul were fled. So sleeps the pride of former days, So glory's thrill is o'er, And hearts that once beat high for praise Now feel that pulse no more.
Page 166 - Sacred to the perpetual memory of a great company of Christian people, chiefly women and children, who near this spot were cruelly murdered by the followers of the rebel Nana Dhundu Panth of Bithur, and cast, the dying with the dead, into the well below, on the xvth day of July, MDCCCLVII.
Page 152 - Come you back to Mandalay, Where the old Flotilla lay: Can't you 'ear their paddles chunkin' from Rangoon to Mandalay? On the road to Mandalay, Where the flyin'-fishes play, An' the dawn comes up like thunder outer China 'crost the Bay!
Page 27 - THE stately homes of England, How beautiful they stand ! Amidst their tall ancestral trees, O'er all the pleasant land. The deer across their greensward bound, Through shade and sunny gleam, And the swan glides past them with the sound Of some rejoicing stream.
Page 17 - All ask the cottage of his birth, Gaze on the scenes he loved and sung, And gather feelings not of earth His fields and streams among.
Page 168 - Royal and Dower-royal, I the Queen Fronting thy richest sea with richer hands — A thousand mills roar through me where I glean All races from all lands.
Page 13 - Tis the bells of Shandon, ^ That sound so grand on The pleasant waters of the river Lee.
Page 17 - Ye banks and braes o' bonnie Doon, How can ye bloom sae fresh and fair? How can ye chant, ye little birds, And I sae weary fu' o

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