Contraband: Or, A Losing Hazard, Volume 1

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Chapman and Hall, 1871 - Subscription libraries - 588 pages

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Page 18 - ... cast a wild, mournful expression, half pathetic, half defiant, expressly calculated, it would seem, for the subjugation of mankind...
Page 239 - When I meet you, can I greet you With a haughty little stare? Scarcely glancing where you're prancing By me on the chestnut mare. Still dissembling, though I'm trembling, Thus you know we're trained and taught. For I like you, doesn't it strike you? Like you more than p'raps I ought ! Yes — I like you, doesn't it strike you? Like you more than p'raps I ought ! When I meet you, must I treat you As a stranger, calm and cold, — Softer feeling, half revealing, — Are you waiting to be told? D'you...
Page 41 - Eoss described her beauty graphically enough when she said it was that of an old Greek bas-relief. The features were as regular, the brow as low and wide, the under part of the face slightly prominent, and the mouth, when seen in front, forming that beautiful curve so rarely modelled but in the antique — such a mouth as denotes sensibility, firmness, courage, sympathy, and other noble characteristics of womankind. In addition to these advantages, Helen possesscd what are called " Irish eyes " —...
Page 104 - ... parasol, general sense of triumph, and flush of the summer's day. Poor Goldthred, sitting over against her, strove to stifle certain misgivings that such a goddess was too noble a prize for creatures of common mould, and vaguely wished he had kept away from the flame, round which, like some singed moth, he could not help fluttering in senseless, suicidal infatuation ! Parties of pleasure cannot always be equally pleasant to everybody concerned. Miss Eoss, too, seemed out of spirits and pre-occupied...
Page 55 - The aggravation was sure to follow, else wherefore were dresses of exquisite fabric contracted, gloves and bonnets sent home, coils of fragrant hair laid fold on fold, smooth, shining, and insidious as the involutions of the great Serpent himself ? It was difficult to say which of these two Amazons could boast the highest score of victims. Perhaps Mrs. Lascelles proved most successful in the massacre of middleaged adorers, while young boys and old gentlemen fell prostrate without effort, willing...
Page 257 - From that garrulous old woman, too, she hoped to learn 4 something definite about Achille. Why he was in England ? what were his relations with the child? whether — and her heart bounded at the thought — it might not be possible, through the agency of this humble old peasant-woman, to obtain uncontrolled possession of her treasure ?• For such an object she felt she would willingly forego the patronage of Mrs. Lascelles, the vassalage of Uncle Joseph, home, position, prospects ! Even Frank Vanguard...
Page 106 - Very /" assented Mrs. Lascelles ; " but you should see him in regimentals, my dear. I think I'll ask him to dinner." Symptoms of mental disquietude in Uncle Joseph and young Goldthred. Each marvelling that a transitory glimpse, while passing at a hand-gallop, should have made so vivid an impression; and the latter wondering whether, if he were to alter the whole tenor of his life, to arm his chest with a cuirass, and plunge his legs into jack-boots, Mrs. Lascelles would deem him also worth looking...
Page 109 - How can you, papa?" replies Nell. "It's wicked of you to bet, though you do generally seem to win." Helen draws the usual distinction as to the immorality of gambling. To win is less than folly, to lose is more than sin. I do not think though that Sir Henry was equally confiding about his wagers when his judgment had been at fault.
Page 210 - I should say, from his conversation. However, that's not the question. He has done me a very great service, the greatest, probably, that one human being can do another ; for, though I laugh at it now, it seemed no laughing matter, I assure you, while that dreadful whirl of water was filling •mouth, and nose, and ears ; but if you think I am so missy-ish that I consider it necessary to...
Page 119 - Eaces, for field-officers, captains, subalterns, and all concerned in the dispensation of unbounded hospitality at Windsor during the meeting. They entertain countless guests, they convey them to and from the Course, they provide board and lodging for the gentlemen, amusement and adoration for the ladies, they are afoot day and night ; yet seem always fresh, lively, goodhumoured, and on the alert. But even cavalry officers are mortal, and though they never confess it, they must be very tired, and...

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