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and robe pelice, form an elegant morning cos- | quitted Truro. There I was at least coniented. tome: the former are generally of chip with silk | The confined circle in which my faculties were trowns; and the latter of white, or coloured permitted to roam, gave little opportunity for the muslin, trimmed with thread lace. The French expansion of thought, of the intercourse of pocloak of wbite srsnet, is very generally esteemed; i lished life: A still quiet rourine of domestic this article is also trimmed round with broad pursuits and feelings, rendered my spirits calm and lace; and is formed somewhat like the capuchins serene. My pleasures were not dazzling, were Worn by oar females of old. Caps are considered || not visid; but then they satisfied me. And if an indispensable in the morning costume. These (as is asserted) all happiness is comparative, I are variously formed; but the Anne Bullen cap, cannot say absolutely that I am benefited by the and the Bronswick mob, are those in general change. For with all the numerous pleasures eti nation, both for their novelty, simplicity, and by which I have of late been surrounded-while elegance. A large bonnet, styled the woodland | friends have flattered and beaus pursued; yet do poke, has lately been introduced. It forms a I not feel that perfect tranquillity I was sensible complete shade for the face; and is particularly of when in Cornwall. A restless anxiety, a sort adapted for those ladies, who, on the public pro- || of hurrying apprehensive emotion, flutters in my raenades, or by the sea side, would be otherwise breast; and I am not philosopher enough to exposed to the scorching rays of a summer's trace the cause which actuates, or the medicine sun. These bonnets, so conspicuous for unob- which heals. We were to have quitted town trusive neatness, are best formed of clear leno, three days since; but have this inorning received with the raised pea spot. They are lined with cards for the Marchioness of S- ',last grand coloured sarsnet, agreeably to the taste of the assembly, which will collect together all the rank Kveral wearers ; trimmed round the edge and and beauty in London and its environs. Mary is crown, with a Vandy ke lace, and simply confined | one of those happy mortals who catch pleasure with a ribbon under the chin. The French | as it Aies, and will not deprive herself of any jacket and petticoats, of cambric, edged with a amusement morally within her reach. A letter beading of embroidery, are the last new article for is travelling by to day's post, soliciting an inDorning attire: the jacket is made with a square dulgence, which, after so long an absence, I collar, and long sleeves; shaped to the form of searcely dare hope to obtain-nothing less, Julia, the arm. Sometimes it is cut with a round frock | than that I be permitted to accompany these debosom; and worn with an embroidered shirt. | lightful relatives, first to their country seat in Trinkets have undergone little change since our Kent, and from thence to Brighton races. For. last information. The sapphire necklace, earrings, 1 give me, Julia, if I say that I wait in fearful susand brooches, are most distinguishable on females pence the result of this petition. Brighton; I am of taste; but pearls, diamonds, emeralds, and told, is the very centre of fashionable attraction the union of gold and hair, must ever be ranked | at that season; and the scene will to me possess amidst the most chaste and elegant ornaments in all the charm of novelty in addition. I shall, this line. Gloves and shoes admit of little from this place, be able to continue my commuvariety. The kid slipper for walking ; and the nications to you from the most select and elegant sandal of satin, for full dress, are generally sources; and how much subject for personal adopted.

conversation will it afford for our evening tete.c. The prevailing colours for the season are pink, teles on my return to you. Do not, therefore, lavender blossom, green, and jonquille.

condenin me on the score of friendship, dear

Julia ! Gladly would I bring you to me; but as LETTER ON DRESS.

this is impracticable, I will endeavour to atone

for my protracted absence by renewing my treaty FRON ELIZA TO JULIA, PREVIOUS TO HER

with you. There are people, Julia, who prefer DEPARTURE FROM LONDON.

epistolary to personal converse. You remember Alas! my dear Julia, this will probably be the story related by Madam de Luxembourg in the last letter you will receive from me bearing the Confessions of Rousseau, of the man who the date of dear enchanting London. My spirits quitted the company of his mistress purely that are, I confess, a little below par at the prospect he might have the pleasure of writing to her. of quitling its gay and jocund scenes. The po Now though this conduct may by numbers be lished societies, the fashionable assemblies, the thought the very essence of romance, proceedtheatres, gardens, and public drives, the works ing from visionaries, who, dissatisfied with things of genius and the productions of art; have all as they are, form to themselves a world of their afforded me amusement and delight; and, I fear, I own, and people it with the offspring of their given me a relish for higher enjoyments. Per | own refined imaginations : yet will I maintain baps, my friend, it had been better had I never that there are situations in which an epistolary such as move in a more domesticated sphere, || The hair in alternate ringlets, and bands, was have our fair country-women exhibited testi- || ornamented with the same flowers, trastefully monjes of their advancement in taste, and the | disposed. A sandal of white sa:in, laced with graces of life.

green chord, fastened with a tassel above the The era is long since past, when the daughters || bend of the ankle. of our Isle condescended to turn copyists; and The second dress, which struck us as singularly the females of a neighbouring kingdom are now attractive, was styled the Cashmerian robe.' happy to aid their exhausted inventions, by This dress was formed of azure blue crape, with adopting the correct graces of English style. alternate spots of blue and silver foil, and ornaWhen, therefore, we offer a sample of Parisian mented at the extreme edge with silver fringe. It decorations, it is more with a view of rendering was worn over a white satin round dress; was our information extensive, various, and amusing, fastened with a pearl brooch on the left shoulder, than from the necessity of offering to British and fell in a kind of Roman drapery round the females prototypes for imitation.

form in front, gradually descending till it comAlthough the metropolis is gradually losing on | posed the train, completing the most elegant the score of fashionable attraction, yet do the tout ensemble that imagination could paint. The Opera, Vauxhall, and our summer Theatres, stil || head-dress, worn with this habit, consisted of a continue to exhibit a crowded display of beauty !! small half-square of blue patent-net, spangled and fashion. Pleasure still bolds her court within and bordered with silver. It was tied simply its walls; and her votaries, beguiled by her va across the forehead, in the Chinese style, beyond rious allurements, seem reluctant to quit the | which the hair appeared in dishevelled curls, and field.

occasionally fell over the handkerchief. The Litile alteration is visible in the out-door cos. || shoes were blue satin, with silver rosets. tume since our last cominunication ; but at Dress gowns are still worn high in the bosom, Vauxhall we observe a novelty and grace of | and very low on the back and shoulders. No style appropriate to that place of captivating || handkerchief is seen in full dress; but the bottom, resori. The light Aowing robes, and shadowy | sleeves, and neck, are frequently ornamented vestments, flowery ornaments, and azure veils, with borders of natural flowers. Dancing dresses worn by our fashionable elegantes, conspire to of Italian tiffany, crape, or leno, bordered with render i his brilliant scene truly Arcadian. Gowns || the convolvolus, wild roses, daisies, violets, &c. and robes are now usually made round, and l &c. have this season given a most animated coup short; trains, even in full dress, being almost d'ail to the ball-room, Indeed flowers as an entirely exploded. We trust, however, that a ornament were never introduced with a more disspeedy edict from the throne of taste, will again tinguishing effect. For the hair, they are formed introduce this graceful appendage; for, however in wreaths, tiaras, and small bunches; and each convenient and appropriate (which the short are placed very low on the forehead. The hair dress certainly is) to the morning, or walking is now scarcely every seen without an ornament costume, the distinguishing effect of a drawing- 11 of this kind, or the small half handkerchief, room is destroyed by this general reduction, and | which consists of patent net, embroidered or our females unquestionably deprived of much spangled. The latter was the distinguishing external dignity and elegance. Frocks of co- ll ornament of a fair bride of rank, on her first aploured muslin, or Italian crape, with a painted pearance at the opera, after her marriage. It border of shells in Mosaic, worn over white I was disposed in the Chinese style; but they are sarsnet slips, are a new and elegant article; and l equally fashionable placed at the back of the French veils of coloured gauze, forming at once || head, and brought under the chin, with tiaras the head-dress and drapery, are considered as || formed of carnations in front of the forehead. . most graceful ornaments. They are usually || Bandeaus of broad gold are classed amidst a faworn with a plain white sarsnet or muslin gown, shionable selection; but the turban has long re. with flowers or wreaths in front of the hair, signed its place, in the spliere of taste and ele. placed towards the left side, so as newsly to ob- li gance. That dignified and graceful ornament, scure the ee brow,

the winged ruff, « In Mary Queen of Scots, At the Duchess of M 's last rout, we seems entirely confined to a few females of rank noticed two dresses of much novel attraction. and taste, and is perhaps more immediately ap. The one entitled 'the Pomeranian mantle,' was propriated to such as may claim the privilege of formed of pea green gauze, cut in irregular singularity. The Vandyke though still very pointed drapery, and trimmed with a silver tufted Il prevalent, is not considered so novel, or genteel, fringe; it was worn over a Gossamer satin under. as the shell or crescent scollop; and the prodress, which had a narrow border of the hop- | menade lippets, and French bonnets, are now blossom delicately painted round the bottom.- become absolutely canaillish. The Gipsy hai;

a

and robe pelice, form an elegant inorning cos. quitted Truro. There I was at least contented. tume: the former are generally of chip with silk The confined circle in which my faculties were crowns; and the latter of white, or coloured Il permitted to roam, gave little opportunity for the muslin, trimmed with thread lace. The French expansion of thought, or the intercourse of poe doak of white sarsnet, is very generally esteemed; | lished life: A still quiet routine of domestic this article is also trimmed round with broad | pursuits and feelings, rendered my spirits calin and lace; and is formed somewhat like the capuchins li serene. My pleasures were not dazzling, were worn by our females of old. Caps are considered || not vivid; but then they satisfied me. And if an indispensable in the morning costume. These Il (as is asserted) all happiness is comparative, I are Furiously formed; but the Anne Bullen cap, I cannot say absolutely that I am benefited by the and the Brunswick mob, are those in general change. For with all the numerous pleasures estination, both for their novelty, simplicity, and by which I have of lule been surrounded while elegance. A large bonnet, styled the woodland friends have Aattered and beaus pursued; yet do poke, has lately been introduced. 1. forms a I not feel that perfect tranquillity I was sensible complete shade for the face; and is particularly of when in Cornwall. A restless anxiety, a sort adapted for those ladies, who, on the public pro of hurrying apprehensive emotion, Autters in my menades, or by the sea side, would be otherwise breast; and I ari not philosopher enough to exposed to the scorching rays of a summer's trace the cause which actuates, or the medicine sun. These bonnets, so conspicuous for unob- which heals. We were to have quitted town trusive neatness, are best formed of clear leno, three days since; but have this inorning received with the raised pea spot. They are lined with cards for the Marchioness of S- last grand coloured sarsnet, agreeably to the taste of the assembly, which will collect together all the rank several wearers; trimmed round the edge and and beauty in London and its environs. Mary is Crown, with a Vandyke lace, and simply confined one of those happy mortals who catch pleasure with a ribbon under the chin. The French | as it Aies, and will not deprive herself of any jacket and petticoats, of cambric, edged with a | amusement morally within her reach. A letter beading of embroidery, are the last new article for | is travelling by to day's post, soliciting an inmorning attire: the jacket is made with a square dulgence, which, after so long an absence, I collar, and long sleeves; shaped to the form of searcely dare hope to obtain-nothing less, Julia, the arm. Sometimes it is cut with a round frock | than that I be permitted to accompany these debosom; and worn with an embroidered shirt. lightful relatives, first to their country seat in Trinkets have undergone little change since our Kent, and from thence to Brighton races. For. last information. The sapphire necklace, earrings, give me, Julia, if I say that I wait in fearful sus. and brooches, are most distinguishable on females pence the result of this petition. Brighiton; I am of taste; but peails, diamonds, emeralds, and told, is the very centre of fashionable attraction the union of gold and hair, must ever be ranked at that season; and the scene will to me possess amidst the most chaste and elegant ornaments in all the charm of novelty in addition. I shall, this line. Gloves and shoes admit of little from this place, be able to continue my commuvariety. The kid slipper for walking ; and the nications to you from the most select and elegant sandal of satin, for full dress, are generally sources; and how much subject for personal adopted.

conversation will it afford for our evening tete-q. The prevailing colours for the season are pink, tetes on my return to you. Do not, therefore, lavender blossom, green, and jonquille.

condenın me on the score of friendship, dear

Julia! Gladly would I bring you to me; but as LETTER ON DRESS.

this is impracticable, I will endeavour to atone

for my protracted absence by renewing my treaty PRON ELIZA TO JULIA, PREVIOUS TO HER

with you. There are people, Julia, who prefer DEPARTURE FROM LONDON.

epistolary to personal converse. You remember Alas! my dear Julia, this will probably be the story related by Madam de Luxembourg in the last letter you will receive from me bearing the Confessions of Rousseau, of the man who the date of dear enchanting London. My spirits quitted the company of his mistress purely that are, I confess, a little below par at the prospect he might have the pleasure of writing to her. of gaiting its gay and jocund scenes. The po- l Now though this conduct may by numbers be Tished societies, the fashionable assemblies, the thought the very essence of romance, proceedtheatres, gardens, and public drives, the works ing from visionaries, who, dissatisfied with things of genius and the productions of art; have all as they are, form to themselves a world of their afforded me amusement and delight; and, I fear, ll own, and people it with the offspring of their given me a relish for higher enjoyments. Pur own refined imaginations : yet will I maintain Laps, my friend, it had been better had I never ! that there are situations in which an epistolary

correspondence is more interesting and effectivel: were trimmed with a broad French lace; above than a personal commune; and, I trust, that my ll which was laid a white satin ribbon. The bosoms determined exertions to afford you instruction and and sleeves were gored ; and the seams finished amusement, will substantiate what I advance. with satin beading. Mary wore her hair braider,

Now then, dear Julia, to begin with the time and jastened in knots in the French style, at the present and to come; for each, I assure you, is back of her head, with a comb of brilliants à la fully occupied with a succession of engagements. |cheraux de frise, a bandeau in the Chinese style To-night we attend the Duchess of B 's crossed her forehead, and over her head was concert; and scarcely a disengaged two bours thrown in graceful negligence, a long veil of presents itself during our stay in town : for Paris net, embroidered in an elegant border of the though many fashionables of acknowledged ce pheasant's eye, copied to nature. This veil fell lebrity have quitted the metropolis, it only seems | in tasteful folds about her figure, shading con." to have excited a more determined animation in || sistently the bosom, and forming a drapery those which still sojourn within its walls; and strangely beautiful. Mary's figure is perfectly every place of fashionable resort still exhibits an adapled to this style of ornament, being the very assemblage which bespeaks neither a dearth of model of Grecian symmetry. My petite person beauty, rank, or elegance.

would have been perfectly shrouded in such an Last evcrting we mustered a strong party for article ; so, Julia, I contented myself with my the opera, to witness the unparalleled powers of hair à la rustique, decorated with a bunch of the Catalani at her second benefit. Now, Julia, I variagated pea-blossom; which divided the curls. charge you not to laugh at, or cavil with me in front of the forehead; and appeared in a when I say, that though I do not understand i cluster so as nearly to obscure the left eyebrow. more than a few words of Italian, yet did I feel | My bosom was shaded with a half handkerchief every note poured from the enchanting pipe of of patent net, embroidered in a border of the this sweet minstrel. Never did I witness such same flowers in colours; and was simply fastened' versatility of powers. The emphatic, the digni- || at the throat with an Egyptian amulet set in fied, the expressive, the sublime, the insinuating; || pearls and gold. Mary has just ordered several all reach the hearts of her enraptured auditors, || new articles of attire for the country. A new and proclaim this surprising woman to possess | set of morning dresses, consisting of the French the #ery soul of harmony. Thus much for my jacket and petticoat; the robe pelice of blossom, favourite enchantress, who appears to have only and white muslin. Riding coats of Circassian one thing to learn, that of economizing her silk. A gipsy hat of satin straw, and woodland talents; or rather, the art of making herself poke bonnet. All her evening dresses are with scarce. So tottering and incomplete is the out trains, ornamented at the feet with lace, fabric on which public applause is founded ; work, or crescent scollops; and worn with the that they, I am convinced, are most likely to imperial ruff of lace. Little satin caps, and the continue favourites, who wisely leave much to cap Anne Bullen, with wreaths and bunches of hope and expectation.

natural flowers, are to form a part of her exten." But avaunt this moralizing strain ! and let me sive and tasteful wardrobe. I send you, dear step at once (a prodigious effort of mental ayi. | Julia, one of the prettiest gipgy hats I have ever lity), from the pulpit to the orchestra - from seen, with a wreath of the blue convolvolus; volumes of ethics to the crowd at Vauxhall. I which you must simply twine round the crown: Gladly, I am sure, will Julia go with me in the 1 for you must lay aside your little French bonnet,* exchange. Well then, to this gay spot come they being now considered antifushionable along my friend; and gather from the costume Adieu ! dear Julia. Friday's post will determine selected by fashionables such as Mary and me, all whether I am destined to follow in the train of few well-directed arrows for your bow. Our fashion's votaries, or soon to embrace those dear gowns were composed of the same materials, and fire-side friends, who will ever be sacred to the consisted of India mull muslin, worked in the || affections of most delicate and minute sprigs. They were ||

ELIZA. made a walking length; and round the bottom, ||

London: Printed by and for J. Bell, Southampton-Street, Strand,

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1. An elegant Portrait of Her MAJESTY THE QUEEN or PRUSSIA. 2. FOUR WHOLE-LENGTH FIGURES of Ladies in the London Fashions for the Month. 3. An ORIGINAL SONG, set to Music for the Harp and Piano-Forte, expressly and exclusively

for this Work, by Mr. M. P. KING. 4. A new and elegant PATTERN for NEEDLE-Work.

19

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF ILLUS-11 FAMILIAR LECTURES ON USEFUL TRIOUS LADIES.

SCIENCES.

Familiar Lectures on Physiognomy........ 98 Her Majesty the Queen of Prussia ........ 63

On Music........
Culinary Researches.....

101 ORIGINAL COMMUNICATIONS. The Criminal; a Tale......

POETRY, A Description of Hamburgh and Bremen.. Original and Select ...................: 103 Definition of a Husband by his Wife...... Camire; an American Tale............

PUBLIC AMUSEMENTS. *Essay on A varice........ Curious account of two Elephants.....

80 || Maids to be Married; by M. Picard ...... 108 How to Tame a Turbulent Husband......

Errors Excepted ...................... 110 The Old Bachelor .........

The Critic.....

111 The Ladies' Toilette; or, Encyclopædia of Letter on the Structure of our Theatres.... ib.

Beauty .........
Curious Anecdote of Mary of Savoy, wife

LA BELLE ASSEMBLEE.
of Alphonso, King of Portugal
A Tale of Former Times ..............

Explanation of the Prints of Fashions.... 113 An account of the City of Vienna, and the English and Parisian Costume .......... ib.

Manners of its Inhabitants............ 91!' A regular and entensive Delineation of the A Dream on the Occupation of departed

most select Fashions for the Season .... 114

....... 94 Letter on Dress........................ 115 The Antiquarian Olio.................. 97 || Supplementary Advertisements for the Month.

Souls.

Indon: Printed by and for J. Bell, Proprietor of the Weekly MESSENGER, Southampton-Street,

Strand, September 1, 1807.

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