Leisure hours with good authors

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Mitchell and Hughes, 1877 - Readers - 258 pages
 

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1877/258p./223

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Page 4 - I LOVE it, I love it ; and who shall dare To chide me for loving that old Arm-chair ? I've treasured it long as a sainted prize ; I've bedewed it with tears, and embalmed it with sighs. 'Tis bound by a thousand bands to my heart ; Not a tie will break, not a link will start. Would ye learn the spell ? — a mother sat there ; And a sacred thing is that old Arm-chair.
Page 147 - That, from the inmost darkness of the place, Comes, scarcely felt; — the barky trunks, the ground, The fresh, moist ground, are all instinct with thee.
Page 175 - No, the bugle sounds no more, And the twanging bow no more ; Silent is the ivory shrill Past the heath and up the hill ; There is no mid-forest laugh, Where lone Echo gives the half To some wight, amaz'd to hear Jesting, deep in forest drear.
Page 148 - E'er wore his crown as loftily as he Wears the green coronal of leaves with which Thy hand has graced him. Nestled at his root Is beauty, such as blooms not in the glare Of the broad sun.
Page 175 - And their minutes buried all Under the down-trodden pall Of the leaves of many years : Many times have winter's shears, Frozen north, and chilling east, Sounded tempests to the feast Of the forest's whispering fleeces, Since men knew nor rent nor leases. No ! the bugle sounds no more...
Page 245 - ... would, in my opinion, .do him very little honour; for sure it is much easier, -much less the subject of admiration, to paint a man with a nose, or any other feature, of a preposterous size, or to expose him in some absurd or monstrous attitude, than to express the affections of men on canvas. It...
Page 47 - I had to cross, in my post-chaise, the long and dreary heath of Bagshot; then, at the end of it, to mount a hill called Hungry Hill ; and from that hill I knew that I should look down into the beautiful and fertile vale of Farnham. My heart fluttered with impatience, mixed with a sort of fear, to see all the scenes of my childhood, for I had learned before, the death of my father and mother.
Page 212 - Casas, he was conspicuous for his stately and commanding person, which, with his countenance rendered venerable by his gray hairs, gave him the august appearance of a senator of Rome. A modest smile lighted up his features, showing that he enjoyed the state and glory in which he came ; and certainly nothing could be more deeply moving to a mind inflamed by noble ambition, and conscious of having greatly deserved, than these testimonials of the admiration and gratitude of a nation, or rather of a...
Page 14 - How many, hired servants of my father's have bread enough and to spare, and I perish with hunger! "I will rise and go to my father, and say unto him, Father, I have sinned against heaven, and before thee, "And am no more worthy to be called thy son: make me as one of thy hired servants.
Page 175 - For he left the merry tale Messenger for spicy ale. Gone the merry morris din, Gone the song of Gamelyn, Gone the tough-belted outlaw Idling in the

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