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Knights Companions of the Order to wear it the same way.

Moving Epitaph, in Northumberland.
Here lies, to parents, friends, and country dear,
A youth, who scarce had seen his 17th year,
But, in that time, so much good sense bad shown,
That Death mistook 17 for 71.

Madame Catalani.- Ireland contests with Italy the honour of this Lady's nativity. We before heard the claim, but treated it, perhaps as it deserved, without attention. We are induced to give to our readers the following Letter on the subject, resigning to those who may feel inclined for the inquiry, to investigate the accuracy of the pedigree.

: “ Waterford, May 12, 1808. “ Some persons in this neighbourhood, who have devoted much research as to the parentage of Madame Catalani, have given the following as the result of their inquiries : it is generally credited here, but you must judge for yourself. Some years since, Tenducci, the celebrated singer, sought refuge in this country from the angry importunity of his creditors in England, and was so fortunate as to be received at the hospitable mansion of Mr. Power, at Ballymacarbery, in this country, about six miles from Clonmel. At this period, there was a child living at Mr. Power's known only by the name of Cathleen (the Irish for

en a

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Catharine)-this child was the offspring of an illicit passion between a young gentleman of the name of Daniel, and a connection of the Power family; and at that period of infancy, displayed much beauty of person, and an uncommon taste for music.

“ Tenducci some time after arranged his affairs, and being desirous to evince his gratitude for the kindness he had experienced, and charmed by the proficiency and promise of his little pupil, then about five years old, offered to instruct her in the science of music, and obtained the consent of the mother, and the father's sister (the father being abroad), to take her with him to Italy. When Tenducci arrived in Italy, he placed his charge in a convent, since which timè nothing has been heard of her.

“ Madame Catalani, it appears, was educated in a convent; where, it is added, she was placed by Tenducci; and Catalani, the lady's maiden name, it is contended, is only an Italian corruption or refinement of Cathleen.

“ The supposed father now resides near this town, and the mother lives in Carrich-on-Suir.”

The following instance of the temper of Buonaparte, as most irritable and over-bearing, occurred a few days after his arrival at Madrid :-An Alcade having, from connivance or negligence, suffered a prisoner of some consideration to escape, the enraged Emperor ordered him into his presence. The instant the offender was ushered in he sprang from his seat, and actually knocked down the poor Spaniard with his fist, and, after discharging a rapid volley of invectives, threats, and imprecations, ordered him to be dragged off by the attendants. The presence of several French officers of rank did not seem in the smallest degree to make him feel the indecorousness of this sally.

Henry and Jane.
Mark the cot on the brow of yon sun-tinted hill,
Where nature and art have united their skill
I feel my old heart throb with ecstacy still

'Tis the cot where I first saw my Jane.
I have travell’d the mountain, the valley, the moor,
Over tracts that were almost untravell'd before;
But long years have elaps'd since I view'd Fowey's shore,

And the cot where I first saw my Jane.
It brings to remembrance the scenes of my youth;
It reminds me of vows, that were founded in truth;
But, alas! soon will fall before time's iron tooth,

The dear cot where I first saw my Jane.
It reminds me of scenes upon life's chequer'd stage,
Of sorrows, alas, which no time can assuage;
Ab! witness the tears and the sobbings of age,

Thou dear cot where I first saw my Jane.

My tears have ceas'd flowing--their fountain is dry;
['ll lay my old limbs on the grass plat hard by,
And there will I languish, and there will I die,

Near the cot where I first saw myJane.

Thus sigh'd the poor wand'rer, and, under a willow,
He stretch'd himself forth, the cold earth was his pillow;
He stretch'd himself forth, at his length on the plain,
And the grave clos'd for ever on Henry and Jane.

The following: Sonnet is extracted from the volume of Poems, just published, by Miss Mitford. They are in the true spirit of poetry.

On being requested to write on Scottish Scenery. Fair art thou, Scotia! The swift mountain stream Gushes, with deaf'ping roar and whitning spray,

From thy brown hills; where eagles seek their prey, Or soar, undazzled, in the solar beam. But, dearer far to me, be thou my theme, My native Hampshire! Thy sweet vallies gay,

Trees, spires, and cots, that in the brilliant ray Confusedly glitter, like a morning dream.

And thou, fair forest! lovely are thy shades, Thy oaks majestic o'er the billows pale

High spreading their green arms: or the deep glades Where the dark holly, arm'd in prickly mail,

Shelters the yellow fern, and tufted blades,. That wave responsive to the sighing gale.

Buonaparte and Commerte.

BUONAPARTE.
Who art thou with front so bold,

My imperial will opposing ?
Caitiff! hast thou not been told, ::::

I'm all ports against thee closing ?
VOL. 1.

Miscreant! think not to evade

My decrees and sov’reign pleasure :
War is now my only trade,
Terror my compulsive measure.

COMMERCE.
Tyrant! I've been often told

Of tby malice, fury, madness ;
But to hear thee rage and scold,
• Ne'er shall sink me into sadness.
Thunder, then, thy fierce decrees,

Be thy barbarous triumphs yaunted;
W bile Britannia rules the seas,
Vandal! I remain undaunted, ,

BUONAPARTE.
Death and b--11! what do I hear!

Varlet ! scoundrel! robber! ruffian!
Off!-or from this fist thy ear

Shall receive Imperial cuffing.
Bring me faggots, bring me fire ;

Coffee-sugar- broad cloth-fustian,
Piled in one commingled pyre,
I devote now to—combustion !

COMMERCE.
Burn away, my Bullyrock!

Burn away !-the goods are paid for ; Quick consumption of the stock,

Merchants know is good their trade for.
Yet I pity the poor slaves,

Who must always pay the piper,
When thy fiery passion raves,
O thou most malicious viper!

I

HAFIZ.

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