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Donovan sent by his wife 16s. to the house of the priest, who refused then to take less than two guineas. On the following Sunday, the priest cursed from the altar all those who had not paid their demands towards building the chapel.Donovan went on the next holiday to mass, and was formally excommunicated, and the people denounced as cursed and contaminated, if they should deal or hold any communication with him. . This threat was so effectual, that no one of the country people would sell a sod of turf to Donovan to heat his oven; and he could not even sell, in his own name, such flour or stock as lay on his hands. Reduced almost to despair, the baker went in a white sheet to the chapel, as a voluntary penance, and asked pardon of God and the priest for his disobedience; and was there, by the priest, desired to attend him to his house, where he again demanded from him the two guineas, which Donovan assured him he could not possibly make up. The excommunication was, therefore, continued in full force against him, and he was consequently obliged to shut up his house.—The above facts were incontrovertibly proved by two unwilling witnesses. The Jury, after a very able charge from the learned Judge, found a verdict for the plaintiff of £50 damages.

Man versus Hedgehog.-W. Moore, of Loughborough, bricklayer, a few days ago, laid a wager of three shillings, that he could, with his hands

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fixed behind him, worry to death a hedgehog with his face. He commenced his extraordinary undertaking by prostrating himself on the ground, and attacking the exterior of his prickly antagonist with his nose. In a few minutes his face was covered with blood, and he appeared to have little chance of success; however, at length having pressed the little animal till it had protruded its head, he snatched at it, and bit it off, thereby winning the wager, to the great amusement of the brutal spectators.

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The Butterfly's Ball and the Grasshopper's Feast.

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Come, take up your hats, and away let us haste
To the Butterfly's Ball, and the Grasshopper's Feast;
The trumpeter Gadfly has summoned the crew,
And the revels are now only waiting for you.

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On the smooth shaven grass, by the side of a wood,..
Beneath a broad oak, which for ages had stood,
See the children of earth, and the tenants of air,
To an evening's amusement together repair.

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And there came the Beetle, so blind and so black,
Who carried the Emmet, his friend, on his back;
And there came the Gnat, and the Dragon-fly too,
With all their relations, green, orange, and blue.

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And there came the Moth, with her plumage of down,
And the Hornet, with jacket of yellow and brown,

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Who with him the Wasp, his companion did bring, But they promis'd, that evening, to lay by their sting.

Then the sly little Dormouse peep'd out of his hole,
And led to the feast his blind cousin, the Mole;
And the Snail, with her horns peeping out of her shell, :
Came fatigued with the distance, the length of an ell.

A mushroom the table, and on it was spread.
A water-dock leaf, which their table-cloth made.
The viands were various, to each of their taste,
And the Bee brought the honey to sweeten the feast.

With steps most majestic the Snail did advance, .
And he promis’d the gazers a minuet to dance;
But they all laugh'd so loud, that he drew in his head,
And went, in his own little chamber, to bed.

Then, as evening gave way to the shadows of night, Their watchman, the Glow-worm, came out with his

light; So home let us hasten, while yet we can see, For no watchman is waiting for you, or for me!

To my Arm Chair.
Thou lov'd companion of my lonely hours, .

When Fortune frown'd, and friends were far away,
Oft bave I blest thee for thy soothing powers,

And fondly courted thy narcotic sway.'

Lull'd in thine arms, I taste a pleasing calm,

With eyelids clos’d, but thoughts that ever wake, O’er my wrapt senses steals an opiate balm,

And my rack'd head almost forgets to ache.

To brighter scenes excursive fancy flies,

The future smiles in gayer garb array'd; Visions of sweet domestic joys arise,

As peeps the parsonage from the sheltering shade,

The laugh, the jest, the fleeting hours beguile,

While heavenly Music's softening charms combine With friends who bring good humour's ready smile,

And hearts that beat in unison with mine.

Not with one wish imagination burns,

O’er proud ambition's slippery paths to roam, True as the needle, to one point she turns,

The point comprising all I cherish-Home..

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No drowsy dullness o’er the powers of mind

Thy soothing charms, my honour'd Chair, diffuse; Oft in thy bosom, by my fire, reclin'd,

I weave the verse, and woo the playful Muse.

Borne on her wing, 'mid fairy climes I go,,

Though sad around me moans the wintry gale, Crop Fancy's roses ’mid December's snow,

And balmy Spring's ambrosial breeze inhale.

If such the calm, when blest with thee, I share

If such the joys thy gentle influence showers; Can the proud Despot's tottering throne compare

With thee, companion of my lonely hours ?

No; o'er his head, though Parian columns rise,

And lends the cot its humble roof to me;
He, in his throne, 'mid torturing anguish sighs-- . -

I smile serene, and dream of bliss in thee.

MARY,
TO AN IRISH AIR.

O very sweet was morning's dawn,

. To me, my Mary,
When thou and I stray'd o'er the lawn

Together, Mary :
And very sweet was yon green grove,

My gentle Mary,
Where first I heard thee own thy love

For me, my Mary.
This blowing rose resembles thee,

My modest Mary;
For in its leaves I think I see

Thy blushes, Mary.
Thy song was like the linnet's song,

My tender Mary;
I fancy it thy voice among

The hawthorns, Mary.
And O, these dewy gems I prize,

They sparkle, Mary,
So like the diamonds in your eyes,

My lovely Mary.

E. M.

Extraordinary Suicide.—Yesterday morning, between eleven and twelve o'clock, a Jewish gentleman, of the name of Levi, threw himself from the top of the Monument, and was dashed to pieces on the spot. He fell close to the foot of the Monument, in Monument Yard, pitched upon his head, and expired without a groan. The

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