The University of Cambridge: From the royal injunctions of 1535 to the accession of Charles the First

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University Press, 1884
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Contents

MATTHEW PARKER of Corpus
47
CONTROVERSY RESPECTING THE PRONUNCIATION OF GREEK
54
Statute of 1544 for the matriculation of students
63
Interference of the Crown in elections to masterships
72
Rumours of a new College
80
FROM THE FOUNDATION OF TRINITY COLLEGE TO
87
Importance of such foundations to the universities ib
93
Comfort and security of college life
96
Nonresidency of Heads
102
Dissensions among their followers
107
Character of its theological school
108
Disputations in honour of the Visitors the Eucharist being
114
His remonstrance elsewhere oocasioned by the indolence
120
Circumstances unfavorable to the revival of the study
127
SMITHS INAUGURAL ADDRESS AS Regius PROFESSOR
130
ORIGINAL STATUTES OF TRINITY COLLEGE Nov 1552
139
Lessons to be learnt in chambers and recited in hall
143
Return and arrest of Northumberland
149
Increase in the number proceeding to degrees
153
GONVILLE HALL
160
Aschams description of the state of the university during
166
His visit to Cambridge
167
Changes enforced in the headships of St Johns Pembroke
177
Low ebb of education among the clergy
183
Tuomas CARTWRIGHT
194
The Johnians reject the surplice
200
Bartholomew Clerke of Kings College
206
EDWARD DERING
234
His Answer to the Admonition
240
Death of archbishop Parker 17 May 1575
246
Change in the feelings of the Catholic party with respect to
253
Apparent success of Whitgifts policy judged by its results
262
PAGE
266
New statutes given to St Johns
267
He recommends Howland as his successor at Trinity
273
Travers a favorite of Lord Burghley
275
Others might have been better spared
279
Puritanism in the ascendant at the latter university
283
Significance of the appearance of this new version of the Dis
286
Renewed activity of the Puritan party
291
Reviving spirit of the Puritan party at Cambridge
298
Whitgifts letter to Burghley on the appearance of the volume
305
The university wits refuse to hum
311
The statute de Mora Sociorum
315
Burghley refers the decision of the matter to Grindal and Sandys
322
The measure chiefly owing to the foresight of Sir Thomas Smith
375
Consequent disappearance of the hostel
381
Counterpetition of the universities
385
THE UNDERGRADUATES OF THE PERIOD
391
FEATURES IN THE UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OF STUDY WHICH DIS
402
136
421
His sympathies entirely with the common lawyers
424
COMPARISON OF THE STATE OF THE ENGLISH UNIVERSITIES WITH
432
Sir Robert Cecil is elected his successor
440
Bacons advice to James
446
Unanimity of the universitiesthe Cambridge letter to Oxford
452
He and Whitgift reconciled in their latter years
454
Fullers observations on the results of this measure
462
Death of the earl of Salisbury and election of his successor
464
Increasing importance of college history
466
EMMANUEL and Christs Colleges
472
HUMPHREY TYNDALL president of Queens A D 15791614
478
LANCELOT ANDREWES master of Pembroke A D 15891605
486
John RICHARDSON master of Peterhouse A D 16091615
493
CLEMENT CORBET master A D 16111626
500
ANDREW DOWNES professor of Greek A D 15851625
506
Visit of prince Charles and the Elector Palatine Mar 1613
514
The old contention
525
Conflict between the ecclesiastical courts and the common
527
Tabors ACCOUNT OF THE SECOND VISIT
544
307
545
Bacon proves to have anticipated their request
550
Effect of the royal visit on individual minds
553
DAVID PARAEUS
563
State of Clare College
564
William Lucys Armiuian sermon
568
170
643
The wealthier clergy required to maintain scholars at
645
The state of affairs at Cambridge far more favorable than that
651
Election of Richard Clayton to the mastership of St Johns
652
BARNABY Gooch master of Magdalene A D 16041626
653
311
656
Conduct of the Heads on being called upon to take the oath
660
In conjunction with other of the Heads he prepares a new body
664
It is proposed that Chaderton shall retire and Preston be
665
237
670
240
681
175
682
Criticism of Bacon on the defects of the universities in his day 437S

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Page 686 - The Pointed Prayer Book, being the Book of Common Prayer with the Psalter or Psalms of David, pointed as they are to be sung or said in Churches.
Page 686 - The Missing Fragment of the Latin Translation of the Fourth Book of Ezra, discovered, and edited with an Introduction and Notes, and a facsimile of the MS., by ROBERT L.
Page 332 - And Annas the high priest, and Caiaphas, and John, and Alexander, and as many as were of the kindred of the high priest, were gathered together at Jerusalem.
Page 435 - For while the tired waves, vainly breaking, Seem here no painful inch to gain, Far back, through creeks and inlets making, Comes silent, flooding in, the main. And not by eastern windows only, When daylight comes, comes in the light; In front, the sun climbs slow, how slowly, But westward, look, the land is bright.
Page 686 - THE CAMBRIDGE PSALTER, for the use of Choirs and Organists. Specially adapted for Congregations in which the " Cambridge Pointed Prayer Book
Page 684 - By FHA SCRIVENER, MA, DCL, LL.D., Prebendary of Exeter and Vicar of Hendon. Crown 8vo.

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