Page images
PDF
EPUB

THE UNITED STATES
Life Insurance Annuity and Trust Company.

CHARTER PERPETUAL-CASH SYSTEM.

CAPITAL $250,000.

OFFICE, 28 MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE, PHILADELPHIA.
OFFICE IN RICHMOND, AT THE OFFICE OF HAXALL & BROTHER.

TWELFTH STREET, NEAR CARY.

Stephen R. Crawford,
Ambrose W. Thompson,
Benjamin W. Tingley,
Jacob L. Florance,
Wm. M. Godwin,

This company is organized upon the mixed principle, Stock and Mutual, which combined features offer to insured members double the usual security. The cash system of payments has also been adopted, thus avoiding the heavy drawback created by unpaid premium notes. The table rates of premium upon which its policies are being issued, is the only scale experience has proven should be adopted, as affording the requisite security to the insured, and an undoubted guarantee for the perpetuity of such institutions. An experimental table may be found worthless at the very instant a policy should possess its greatest value. Life Insurance, very properly, is arresting the attention of the world. The public, however, in their commendable willingness to embrace and employ its wise and salutary provisions, should make ultimate security the primary and most important object, which can only be attained by so adjusting the premiums as to anticipate unexpected losses and fluctuations of every kind. It is the purpose of this Company annually to credit upon the policies of holders and books of the Company such an amount of profits as shall not affect the stability or impair the sacredness of its contracts.

Premiums may, at the option of the insured, be paid annually, semi-annually, or quarterly in advance.

All necessary information, together with blanks, pamphlets, &c., may be obtained gratis at the office of the Company, No. 28, Merchants' Exchange, Philadelphia, and at the Office of Haxall & Brother, Twelfth Street, near Cary, in Richmond, Va.

PHILADELPHIA DIRECTORS.

[ocr errors]

August, 1850.

Paul B. Goddard,
Lawrence Johnson,
George McHenry,
James Devereux,
John L. Linton.

STEPHEN R. CRAWFORD, President.
AMBROSE W. THOMPSON, Vice President.
CHARLES G. IMLAY, Secretary and Treasurer.
MANUEL EYRE, Actuary.

THOMAS BALCH, Counsel and Attorney.
PAUL B. GODDARD, M. D., } Medical
WM. PEPPER, M. D.
Examiners.

NEW YORK DIRECTORS.

Hon. Thomas J. Oakley, City Hall,
Jacob Reese, 42 Beaver street,
John L. Buckley, 31 Front street,
Dr. John B. Beck, 14 Le Roy Place,
Stephen Cambreleng, 18 Wall street,
George Clark, 110 and 273 Broadway, and 10 Astor House,
Hon. THOMAS J. OAKLEY, Chairman of Board.
STEPHEN CAMBRELENG, Attorney and Counsel.
DR. JOHN B. BECK, 14 Leroy Place, Consulting
DR. ABRAM L. COX, 8 Union Place, Physicians.
DR. EDWARD FIELDS, 4 Charlton street,
DR. JOHN T. METCALF, 785 Broadway. Examiners.

Medical

JAMES DURNO, General Agent for Pa.

AGENT FOR RICHMOND---WM. HENRY HAXALL.
Counsel and Attorney---SAMUEL TAYLOR.
Medical Examiner---ROBERT W. HAXALL.

[graphic]
[ocr errors]
[blocks in formation]

1. "The Doctrine of the Higher Law. Mr. Seward's Speech." Extraordinary distension of Mr. Seward's moral sense. Peculiarities of the Abolition movement: evil done by the French Speculators; responsibility of Mr. Seward and the Abolitionists for their immorality and blasphemy: Declamation of Northern Agitators, &c..........130 2. Ghost Stories. First-Second-Third-Fourth Story. Showing the agency of natural causes in all tales of the marvellous...................

KEITH & WOODS, St. Louis, Mo.
J. C. MORGAN, New Orleans,
GEORGE P. PUTNAM, London,
GAINES & RICHES, Petersburg, Va.
W. R. SCRIVEN, Petersburgh, N. Y.
F. HAGAN & Co., Nashville, Tenn.

PAGE.

3. Sketches of the Virginia Convention of 1829-30. By Hugh R. Pleasants. Difference between the present and the last Convention: MORRIS, UPSHUR, DODDRIDGE, COOKE: great anxiety to hear Mr. RANDOLPH: reminiscences of his person &c. Mr. LEIGH-the leader of the Eastern party; his power and readiness in debate. Mr. JOHNSONthe strength of his understanding, and his value to the West. Mr. Morris-powers of narration; great amiability and fondness for children. Mr. STANARD-the clearness of his intellect-force of his likes and dislikes. Judge MARSHALLthe massive character of his understanding, powers of analysis, personal habits, dress, &c., &c..147 4. The College Course. Colleges before the Revolution-Remarks of Dr. Wayland-Rules that should govern students.....

..155

Bensaddi. Chapter IV..........

5. Scraps of Thought. By A. E. Pollard........160 6. Seclusaval; or, the Sequel to the Tale of Judith ........161 7. The Mormons. Review of Mr. Kane's Discourse before the Historical Society of Pennsylvania-Mormon Temple at Nauvoo-Arrest of the Prophet Joseph. Author's visit to the scene -extracts. The settlement of the Mormon emigrants on the Great Salt Lake, &c., &c........170 8. Discipulus. A Tale of St. Valentine's Eve. Chapter II... -175

[ocr errors]

.143

LOCAL

[ocr errors]

www

Whole Number, CXCV.

ORIGINAL PROSE ARTICLES (CONTINUED.)

PAGE.

9. Southern Rights Association. Dependence of the South upon the North-objects of the Association ;-charge of Disunion repelled...........178 10. Letters from New York. Printer's Festival

Appearance of James, Griswold, Irving, Putnam, Bryant, Chapin, Halleck, &c., &c. Three Lectures of the "Artists' Course"-Introductory lecture by Henry James, Esq., on the Nature of Art; other lectures by Messrs. Curtis and Godwin; the Astor Library-Activity and energy of Mr. Cogswell, the Librarian-the Library to consist of 50,000 volumes, all elegantly bound; great value of the portion relating to Natural History. To be opened in the Summer of 1852.............................180 11. The Seldens of Sherwood. Chapter XLVI....184

[blocks in formation]

RICHMOND, VA.

MACFARLANE & FERGUSSON.

..160 .....169 ...175 178

NOTICES OF NEW WORKS

The Women of Israel-The Wide, Wide WorldScenes in the Life of the Saviour-Treasured Thoughts-Queens of Scotland-The Poetry of Science-Youth's Coronal-Wild Flowers from the West-The Duchess-Mackay's Popular Delusions-The Astrolepis of Stromness-Smith and Freund's Classical Dictionaries-American Almanac for 1851-The Island World of the Pacific-Fadette,, a domestic story, &c.......188-192

THIS WORK IS PUBLISHED IN MONTHLY NUMBERS AVERAGING SIXTY-FOUR PAGES EACH, AT FIVE DOLLARS, PER ANNUM, INVARIABLY IN ADVANCE.

AGENTS.

MACFARLANE & FERGUSSON, Richmond, Va.
DEWITT & DAVENPORT, New York.
JOSEPH ROBINSON. Baltimore, Md.
C. C. CLEAVES, Memphis, Tenn.
JOHN P. WRIGHT, Lynchburg, Virginia.
J. H. COGHILL, San Francisco, California.

[graphic]

PUBLISHED Monthly at five dollars PER ANNUM-JNO. R. THOMPSON, EDITOR AND PROPRietor.

VOL. XVII.

RICHMOND, MARCH, 1851.

WANDERING FOOTSTEPS.

NAPLES.

“Vedi Napoli e poi mori.”—Italian Proverb.

QUEEN of the blue, the tideless sea!
My spirit fain would call on thee,

By that sweet, unforgotten name,
Which links with thine its deathless fame;-

A name so dear to him of yore,
Who sleeps upon the western shore,
Under the rock's o'erhanging brow,
Where droops the agéd ilex-bough,
To shade, with reverential gloom,
An urnless, but time-honored tomb,*-
A name-but what would it avail
To tell again the fatal tale?-
The dark despair of Beauty slighted,
The doom of passion unrequited ;-
On such a theme 'twere sad to dwell,
The World already knows it well,
For many a time it hath been told,

In music-breathing lays of old

As sweet as those which charmed the wave,

Ere love-lorn lips grew mute and cold,

And the sands were scooped for the Syren's grave.

Oh! beautiful Parthenope!

That sittest by the azure sea, 'Mong scenes that more than realize Thoughts of primeval Paradise,

Too fair indeed art thou to be A child of earth's unholy beam! To mortal vision thou dost seem The picture of a poet's dream, A radiant gem dropped from the skytA sight to gaze upon and die.

'Tis evening, hark! the distant chime
Of many a deep Cathedral bell,
In music pours its soft farewell
To sunset! It is just the time
That heaven and earth look loveliest.
And from the portals of the west,
A flood of brilliancy, unknown
To any save a cloudless clime,
Streams upward to the zenith high,
Suffusing half the peerless sky
With amber light of radiant tone.
Soft falls afar a purple ray
O'er mountain, plain and silent bay,
Where many a strange, fantastic prow
Of foreign shape and gilded bow,
Is mirrored in the placid tide
That laves its gaily painted side.

* Virgil.

"Un pezzo di cielo caduto in terra.”—Sannazzaro.

VOL. XVII-17

There's not a breath to mar the sleep
That lulls the azure tinted deep,
Or break the silent hush that seems
To gold in vague, mysterious dreams
The motionless boughs that shadow o'er
The margin of the curved shore.

St. Elmo! from thy castled hill,

A wondrous scene mine eyes survey, And through my bosom shoots a thrill It hath not felt for many a day. Above me frowns the fortress dim, With battlement and bastion grim, Below-almost beneath my feet, Extends the princely columned street,

And the far sweeping, noble quay, Bordered by Palaces of State. Graced with Moresco Tower and GateCurtain and sculptured balcony; Convents and spires and villages Gleam through the dark and distant trees, Dotting the dusky masses o'er Of woods that stretch along the shore, By Promontory, Rock and Bay, Embalmed in many a deathless lay. And hallowed by the Sibyl's fame, The Hero and the Sage's name.

Lo! all the beauty of Land and Sea!

The villa and the gadding vine, The grove of Cedar, Cypress, Pine, Where hums by day the golden bee,

Round myrtle bower and marble shrine; And ceaseless through the night's deep noon, The bird of sorrow hymns the moon,

In garden fair, by glittering fountain Or yet more hallowed solitude, Where once the Cæsar's palace stood;

While Echo, from the far-off mountain,
Returning o'er the Elysian plain
Repeats some rich, melodious strain

Of music breathed upon the shore,
Which swells a moment, then again
Is faintly heard retreating o'er
The sleeping waters, far away,
To die upon some distant bay,
Among the listening Isles of green
That gem the crystal seas serene.

NO. 3.

Here Nature fondly vies with art
To win the homage of the heart,
How beautiful!-but 'tis not all-
Even loveliness like this might pall,
But for the unseen spirit there
Which dwelleth in the very air,
And whispers from each dusky wood,
Each crag that dreameth o'er the flood,
Between the Earthquake's mountain hold
And the imperial, rock-based Isle,*

* "Quem rupes Capræarum terra latebit

Incesto possessa seni?"-CL. de 4to. Conf. Hon.

« PreviousContinue »