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SOUTHERN LITERARY GAZETTE.

The only Weekly Journal of its class now published South of the Potomac, and pronounced by its contemporaries, both North and South,

THE HANDSOMEST FIRESIDE NEWSPAPER IN AMERICA.

Published every Saturday, in Charleston, S. C., by WALKER & RICHARDS, at Two Dollars a Year, in advance.

The Gazette is now permanently established, and its steadily advancing reputation and popularity, afford evidence that such a Journal is both needed and appreciated by the Southern people. It is a paper of the larger class, containing weekly four columns more matter than the Home Journal of New York, and printed from beautiful type, on paper of the finest quality. It is conducted by Mr. WILLIAM C. RICHARDS, who is aided by Mr. D. H. JACQUES, a gentleman of high attainments and cultivated tastes.

Many of the best writers of the entire South are regular contributors to its columns, and it has a well regulated corps of

HOME AND FOREIGN CORRESPONDENTS,

through whom all intelligence of interest, in every department of ART, SCIENCE, LITERATURE AND INDUSTRY, is faithfully and speedily obtained. The Gazette is independent in criticism, and in the discussion of every legitimate topic, but strictly

NEUTRAL IN POLITICS AND RELIGION.

It will contain well digested abstracts of

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC INTELLIGENCE,

Together with

REPORTS OF THE MARKET AND GENERAL PRICES CURRENT.

The publishers deem it unnecessary to extend this Prospectus, further than to pledge themselves that the Gazette shall not be second in

ELEGANCE, INTEREST, OR EXTENT OF INFORMATION,

to any weekly family newspaper in the known world. They invoke the patronage and support of all those who desire to see the intellectual resources of the South developed, and who feel a just pride in every token of her progress. Having shown that a Southern family newspaper may be

“AS CHEAP AS THE CHEAPEST, AND AS GOOD AS THE BEST,”

they are willing to confide their enterprise to the patriotism and generosity of their fellow-citizens of the Southern States.

TERMS TO CLUBS:

It will be furnished to persons becoming responsible for the whole number of copies, and having them sent to one address, on the following terms:

Three copies,
Five copies,
Ten copies,

All orders must be accompanied with the money, and addressed, post-paid, to

$5

8 15

WALKER & RICHARDS,
Charleston, S. C.

N. B.-Editors who will copy, or notice fully, this Prospectus, shall receive the Gazette regularly, and also a beautiful Juvenile Magazine, entitled "The Schoolfellow."

SOUTHERN LITERARY MESSENGER.

JNO. R. THOMPSON, EDITOR AND PROPRIETOR.

JULY, 1851.

VOL. XVII., No. 7.

ORIGINAL PROSE ARTICLES.

PAGE.

1. Slavery as a Moral Relation. Discussion of Drs. Fuller and Wayland-Dr. Thornwell's discourse on" the rights and duties of Masters"-Is Slavery a sin in itself? The maxims of the natural equality of all men considered: falsity of the argument upon the diversity of the racesSlavery defensible on higher grounds-Perfect consistency of Slavery with the republican theory of government. The gospel argument-Error of such as contend that the slave is degraded to the condition of a brute: Slavery properly definedPosition of the Southern States, &c.............393 2. Historical and Corographical Description of the Province of Chichas and Tarija, in Upper Peru or Bolivia. From the Mercurio Peruano. By W. S. W. Ruschenberger, U. S. N................

.415

3. Adventures of a Life. From the French of Leon
Gozlan. Chapters First, Second and Third.
4. Goethe's Wilhelm Meister. Early life of Goe-
the-his Pantheistic belief-Des Cartes' Meta-
physical system: Spinoza-His education and
labours-The Cartesian and Baconian philoso-
phies compared-Examination of Spinoza's sys-
tem-Error of his reasoning hinted at: Influ-
ence of materialism over Goethe's whole life-his
want of patriotism: Outline of the Wilhelm
Meister, &c...

5. From our Paris Correspondent. Present aspect
of politics in France-The Fusionists under M.
Guizot-Prospects of Henry V.-Scientific article
of M. Foucault on M. Nikles' discovery for sur-

.420

.431

LOCAL

KEITH & WOODS, St. Louis, Mo.
J. C. MORGAN, New Orleans,
GEORGE P. PUTNAM, London,
GAINES & RICHES, Petersburg, Va.
COURTENAY & WIENGES, Charleston, S. C.
F. HAGAN & Co., Nashville, Tenn.

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ORIGINAL PROSE ARTICLES (CONTINUED.)

Whole Number, CXCIX.

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RICHMOND, VA.

MACFARLANE & FERGUSSON.

..444 .452

.410

9. The Death of Siward..

10. Sonnet by Aglaus.... 11. Verses...

12. Alice Fay. By D. P. Barhydt.....

EDITOR'S TABLE.

The University Painting-White Sulphur Springs
-Professor Spencer-Miss Bremer...

NOTICES OF NEW WORKS—

A Hand-Book of Heraldry-London Labor and the London Poor-The Stones of Venice-HurryGraphs-The Book of Oratory-Yeast-Memoirs of William Wordsworth-The Heir of WastWayland-Southern Repertory and College Re-454-456

420

.431

443

.449

452

453

AGENTS.

MACFARLANE & FERGUSSON, Richmond, Va.
DEWITT & DAVENPORT, New York.
JOSEPH ROBINSON. Baltimore, Md.
C. C. CLEAVES, Memphis, Tenn.
JOHN P. WRIGHT, Lynchburg, Virginia.
J. H. COGHILL, San Francisco, California.

THIS WORK IS PUBLISHED IN MONTHLY NUMBERS AVERAGING SIXTY-FOUR PAGES EACH, AT FIVE DOLLARS, PER ANNUM, INVARIABLY IN ADVANCE.

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SOUTHERN LITERARY MESSENGER.

PUBLISHED MONTHLY AT FIVE DOLLARS PER ANNUM-JNO. R. THOMPSON, EDITOR AND PRoprietor.

VOL. XVII.

RICHMOND, JULY, 1851.

SLAVERY AS A MORAL RELATION.*

The first of the publications at the head of this review, contains a correspondence between two The sermon which we have placed in connecof the most distinguished members of the Bap-tion with this debate, was delivered by Dr. tist clergy, on the great question which finally Thornwell, of South Carolina College, on the resulted in the disruption of the ties that bound occasion alluded to in the title of the publication. the Baptist Churches of the North and South Dr. Thornwell is one of the finest intellects of into one association for missionary operations in this age; and the State and College of South foreign parts. The occasion of the controversy Carolina may well congratulate themselves on grew out of the fierce and denunciatory attitude the possession of a man, whose acute and able taken by the Northern members of a Convention, intellect, whose power of expression, and vigor which met in Philadelphia during the year pre-of address shine so conspicuously in this noble ceding the discussion before us. The ultra doc-discourse. In the dense and masterly logic, the trines broached upon the floor of that body, drew subtle discrimination, and the powerful introverforth a letter from Dr. Fuller, of South Carolina, sions and antithesis of the sermon before us, we a clergyman of ability and distinction, in which find what we do not hesitate to term the ablest he alluded to the views of slavery expressed by and soundest defence of the relation between the President of Brown University, in his treatise master and servant we ever remember to have on the elements of Moral Science. Dr. Way-seen. The sermon is not faultless; and the deland addressed him a reply, and this was the be- ficiency consists principally in the excess of inginning of a controversy of a very remarkable tensity, in the style, and in the artificial characcharacter in more than one respect. It is con- ter of the sentences: formed upon a model of surducted with marked ability on both sides, in a passing but artificial excellence, the style of the clear and frequently vigorous style, and with a author partakes of the brilliant sins of Junius gentleness, a courtesy, a kind and Christian tem- and Johnson, and lacks the easy and graceful per, that really make it a model of polemical dis- transposition, the flowing and flexile alternacussion, and reflect a higher credit upon the good tion from the gay to the grave, from the easy to sense and Christian principle of the parties, than the intense, from the plain and familiar to those even the very able display of logical precision brilliant and lightning-like flashes of excited inand address, exhibited by each of them, reflects tellect, condensed and animated by passionupon their powers of intellect. We close this which compose the delightful variety of a perfect rapid sketch of the general features of the contest, style. with remarking upon a peculiarity which could not We have selected these publications not for the fail to strike the most superficial observer; we purpose of entering into an elaborate analysis of refer to the incessant appeal of Wayland to the the merits of the works and the plan of their arguabstract maxims of morality as modified and ex-ment; but simply as guides and assistants in examplained in the disquisitions of philosophy; and ining the moral character of the relation of master the equally obstinate and pertinacious retreat and servant. The spirit of activity and investigation which has marked the last century of the history of the world, has thrust its shrewd and meddling inquisitiveness into almost every department of human life. Fired by unexampled success in the examination of physical science, the pride of human intellect has refused to acknowledge any limit to its powers, aspires to the

* DOMESTIC SLAVERY, Considered as a Scriptural Institution in a Correspondence, between the Rev. Richard Fuller of Beaufort, S. C., and the Rev. Francis Wayland of Providence, R. I. Revised and corrected by the authors. New York: Published by Lewis

Colby, 122 Nassau street. Boston: Gould, Kendall,

and Lincoln. 1845. pp. 254.

NO. 7.

of his opponent from the mazes of metaphysics to the plain and palpable concretions of the Bible; a happy illustration of the nature of the entire contest between the slavery theories of the North and South.

VOL. XVII-50

THE RIGHTS AND DUTIES OF MASTERS. A Sermon mastery of every subject of inquiry, and too frepreached at the dedication of a church erected in Charles- quently rejects every mystery as synonymous ton, S. C., for the benefit and instruction of the colored with a trick. Reasoning with bold and confipopulation. By Rev. J. H. Thornwell, D. D. Charles

ton, S. C. Steam-power press of Walker & James. 1850-dent plausibility, from certain abstract maxims of political science, without any disposition to

pp. 51.

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