The Cambridge History of Islam, Volume 2, Part 1

Front Cover
P. M. Holt, Peter Malcolm Holt, Ann K. S. Lambton, Bernard Lewis
Cambridge University Press, 1977 - History - 439 pages
1 Review
The aim of these volumes is to present the history of Islam as a cultural whole. It is hoped that in a single concise work the reader will be able to follow all the main threads: political, theological, philosophical, economic, scientific, military, artistic. But The Cambridge history of Islam is not a repository of facts, names and dates; it is not intended primarily for reference, but as a book for continuous reading. The editors believe that, while it will not be despised by the expert orientalist, it will be useful to students in other fields of history, and particularly to university students of oriental subjects, and will also appeal to those who read history for intellectual pleasure. -- From Preface Volume 1A (page ix).
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

MUSLIM INDIA BEFORE THE MUGHALS
3
INDIA AND PAKISTAN
97
SOUTHEAST ASIAN ISLAM TO THE EIGHTEENTH
123
SOUTHEAST ASIAN ISLAM IN THE NINETEENTH
155
SOUTHEAST ASIAN ISLAM IN THE TWENTIETH
182
NORTH AFRICA TO THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY
211
NORTH AFRICA IN THE SIXTEENTH AND SEVEN
238
NORTH AFRICA IN THE PERIOD OF COLONIZA
299
J THE NILOTIC SUDAN
327
THE WESTERN AND CENTRAL SUDAN
345
THE IBERIAN PENINSULA AND SICILY
406
10a The Indian subcontinent in 1525 page 53
412
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1977)

Born in London, Bernard Lewis grew up in England. In 1974 he immigrated to the United States and eight years later became a U.S. citizen. A distinguished scholar of Middle Eastern history and a prolific writer, his education includes a diplome des etudes semitiques from the University of Paris and a Ph.D. from the University of London, where he taught for 25 years before coming to Princeton in 1974. Most recently he has served as professor at the Institute of Advanced Studies and the Department of Near Eastern Studies at Princeton. As a visiting professor, he lectured at a number of notable universities in Europe and the United States.

Bibliographic information